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Image: The Illustrated London News
Mill Workers who lived in Saltaire
Researched by Colin Coates
 

Surnames beginning with:

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Sanctuary, George
1857 - 12 October 1932

George Sanctuary was the son of Thomas Sanctuary. Thomas was born 1831 in East Walton in Norfolk. Working as a labourer he married Elizabeth Atkinson 5 June 1854 at All Saints Bingley.

George, the second eldest of nine children, was born 1857 in Cullingworth. The family were living in Keighley in 1861 with Thomas working as a coachman and groom. By 1871 they were living at Rose Cottage, 12 Victoria Park in Shipley with Thomas working as a gardener and George as a factory operative.

George married Hannah Maria Broadley 26 December1876 at the Register Office in Bradford. By 1881 they were living at 46 George Street in Saltaire with George working as a spinning overlooker. From before1887 to 1896 they lived at 28 Albert Road (renumbered 55); they then moved to 68 George Street where they remained the rest of their lives. Gordon, son of George Sanctuary of 28 Albert Road, died 18 June 1887, aged 10 months.

They had nine children born in Saltaire, with the following seven surviving to adulthood: -

George Frederick (1878 - 11 March 1953)
Edith Alice (1880 - 11 January 1936)
William Thomas (b1882, served in WW1)
Rawson (1885 - 18 November 1949)
Clifford Ewart (13 February 1889 - 6 December 1960)
Annie Louise (30 August 1893 - 1980)
Jack (11 July 1903 - 1989)

Excerpt from a report from the Shipley Times 24 December 1926 as follows:

At the Saltaire Congregational School on Boxing Day, Mr. and Mrs. George Sanctuary, 68 George Street, Saltaire, will entertain about 100 relatives and friends in connection with their golden wedding anniversary. They have been the recipients of several handsome presents, and Mrs. Sanctuary has received a gold wristlet watch from the members of the family. Mr. Sanctuary, who has just retired from his position as spinning overlooker after 60 years and three months employment with the firm of Salt's (Saltaire) Ltd., was on Tuesday evening given a gold watch by the manager and overlookers in the department, the manager (Mr. Orlando Denison) making the presentation. Several colleagues also bore testimony to the friendly relations that had existed between Mr. Sanctuary and themselves. The inscription on the watch is as follows "Presented to George Sanctuary by his colleagues as a token of esteem after 60 years' service at Saltaire Mills. December 24, 1926".

George died 12 October 1932 and was buried at Nab Wood Cemetery in Shipley. Hannah died 28 January 1940 and was buried alongside him.

Report from the Shipley Times 15 October 1932 as follows:

The death took place suddenly on Wednesday, of Mr. George Sanctuary, of 68 Georges Street, Saltaire, who was formerly employed at the Saltaire Mills for 60 years.
Mr. Sanctuary, who was aged 75, was a native of Keighley, but left there in 1866 to take employment at the Saltaire Mills, where he finally became a spinning overlooker. He retired in December 1926, a few days before he and Mrs. Sanctuary celebrated their golden wedding and was presented with an inscribed gold watch as a token of the esteem in which he was held by the manager and overlookers of the department.
Mr. Sanctuary was at one time the secretary of the famous Saltaire Prize Choir, and was during his term of office that, the choir won the £100 prize piano, which they afterwards presented for use at the Victoria Hall, Saltaire. He had also been a member the Saltaire Congregational Church choir.
In politics Mr. Sanctuary was a stalwart Liberal, and both he and Mrs. Sanctuary took a prominent part In local affairs at the time when the Shipley Division was represented by the late Mr. Percy Illingworth. Mrs. Sanctuary was one of the founders of the Shipley Women's Liberal Association.

 

Sanctuary, Isaac
12 May 1843 – 15 September 1935

Isaac Sanctuary was the son of John Sanctuary. John was born c1800 in East Walton, near King’s Lynn, Norfolk. He married Elizabeth Richis 28 April 1823 at Dereham, Norfolk. They had fourteen children.

Isaac was born in 1841. He was baptised 19 September 1841 at East Walton. In 1851 the family were living in Cullingworth, where John was an agricultural labourer and Isaac a doffer aged just ten.

Isaac’s mother, Elizabeth, died in 1856. In 1861 Isaac was a weaver living with his father and siblings at 5 (renumbered 31) George Street in Saltaire.

Isaac married Elizabeth Lambert in 1866. They had two daughters, Helena born in 1867 and Emily in 1870. In 1871 they were living at 4 Helen Street with Isaac working as a warehouseman.

Report from the Bradford Daily Telegraph 19 July 1872: -

Anti-Vaccination Cases at the Bradford Court House

A somewhat unusual series of cases came before the West Riding Magistrate at Bradford this afternoon, and the attitude and utterances of the defendants caused no small amount of excitement.

It seems that the vaccinating officer for Saltaire has determined upon seeing the act for vaccination put in force in that place, and in the discharge of his duty brought a number of men to court who refused, after legal warnings had been given, to have their children vaccinated. The cases were called successively, but for the sake of brevity we give them together.

The names of the men were Anderson Dunford, Jacob Santuary and Isaac Sanctuary, Joseph Armitage, and James Black, all respectable tradesmen of Saltaire.

They all pled guilty to the charge, and upon being asked what they had to say, each – with the exception of Dunford who had brought a friend named Jonathan Mitchell, armed with a copy of the act and sundry other documents, to speak for him – protested upon the unrighteousness of the law, the inability of vaccination to prevent an attack of smallpox, and the iniquity of their being summoned under the provision of the act.

Dunford, when told by the magistrates that “his friend” could not address the bench on his behalf, waxed eloquent and oratorical. He declared that he would “hold himself guilty before high heaven” if he acted according to the law in question.

Jacob Sanctuary “could not allow his child to be vaccinated;” and his brother Isaac “had never placed himself in opposition to the laws of his country; there was no man would charge him with want of care for his child’s welfare, but it was to the end that their welfare should be secured that he could not submit to this law with a clear conscience, no matter under what penalty.”

Joseph Armitage “refused to have his children tainted with disease;” and James Black, the most eloquent of the defendants, said he had been “a fearful sufferer from the ravages of vaccination in the persons of vaccination in the persons of two of his beloved children, one of whom had died of putridity occasioned by the vile stuff.”

The magistrates were there to administer the law in spite of the prejudices of the accused, who inveighed so loudly against it, fined them each 20s and costs or one month in default, and warned them against the folly of persisting in a course of conduct which rendered them liable to a fine of 20s for each day they refused to comply with the provisions of the act.

Sadly in 1874 both of Isaac’s daughters died. In 1881 he was a warehouseman living with his wife at 27(53) Albert Road, Saltaire. Isaac was an active member of the Saltaire New Church Society (Swedenborgian), in June 1887 he was reported as being is superintendent.

Excerpt from a report in the Wharfedale & Airedale Observer 28 June 1889 regarding two men who stole from Saltaire Mills: -

Isaac Sanctuary was also a witness in support of the case of Messrs. Salt. In the first instance he said that had conscientious objection to take the oath, and, on being asked what religion he was connected with, said that he was a Swedenborgian. He said that his objection was that the administration of the oath was a passive confession that ordinarily a man did not speak the truth. He always spoke the truth.

He was allowed to affirm, and stated he was an overlooker and stock manager in the employ of the Saltaire firm. There was a room called No. 3 room, in which the grey stock was kept. Yarn was also kept there.

He could identify the yarn produced as property of the firm. The prisoner had no right to have it in his possession. From a circumstance that he remembered he could say that probably this yarn had been stolen on 30 April, for on that date, a quantity of yarn was sold to a gentleman who complained that there was about 6lbs short weight.

In October 1889 he was reported as being on the committee of The Children’s Summer Holiday Movement.

In 1891 Isaac was a grocer & confectioner living at 7 Windsor Road in Shipley. In July 1891 he was reported as being president of The Saltaire Land Restoration League. In October 1893 he presided at a meeting of the Independent Labour Party, held in the Co-Operative Hall, Shipley.

Report from the Shipley Times 28 October 1893: -

A meeting of the Shipley Division Liberal Association was held on Saturday, when Mr Thornton Pullan submitted report on revision work, which was considered to show satisfactory results. A letter was road from Mr Isaac Sanctuary, of Shipley, resigning his membership she Association. In his letter he stated that he had come to the conclusion that independent action through the Independent Labour Party was the only way in which justice could be obtained for the poor, and that this section of the community could hope for no redress from either the great capitalistic parties—Liberals and Tories. The resignation was accepted, and Mr Jacob Sanctuary, his brother, was elected to the vacant place.  

In 1894 Isaac, representing the Labour Party, fought and lost an election for the Central Ward in Shipley. Isaac lost his wife, Elizabeth, when she died 4 June 1897.

Report from the Shipley Times 5 June: -

Sudden Death – This (Friday) morning the police received information of the sudden death of Mrs. Elizabeth Sanctuary, aged 55 years, wife of Isaac Sanctuary, confectioner, of 47 Hall Lane, Shipley.

It appears that about eighteen months ago the deceased lady suffered from a severe attack of influenza, at which time she was attended by Dr. Waddington, of Bradford, who told her she had a weak heart.

About ten minutes past two o’clock this morning, she was taken suddenly ill and her husband was called up. He at once hastened for Dr. Myers, but upon that gentleman’s arrival the deceased lady had passed away.

By 1903 Isaac had moved to Baildon, living at 9 Tenter Court, before moving to 8 East Parade. In August 1906 Isaac chaired a meeting to consider the formation of a branch of the Independent Labour Party in Baildon. The branch was formed with Isaac as its prime mover.

In the 1911 census, taken 2 April, Isaac, a retired book seller, was visiting the Preston family at 28 Montpellier Parade in Harrogate. He died here 17 April 1911. In his will he left £682 10s 8d (worth c£85,000 in 2020) to James Jeffrey, a traveller.

 

Sanctuary, Jacob
12 May 1843 – 15 September 1935

Jacob Sanctuary was the son of John Sanctuary. John was born c1800 in East Walton, near King’s Lynn, Norfolk. He married Elizabeth Richis 28 April 1823 at Dereham, Norfolk. They had fourteen children.

Jacob was born 12 May 1843. He was baptised 11 June 1843 at East Walton in Norfolk. In 1851 the family were living in Cullingworth, where John was an agricultural labourer and Jacob a doffer aged just eight.

Jacob’s mother, Elizabeth, died in 1856. In 1861 Jacob was living with his father and siblings at 5 (renumbered 31) George Street in Saltaire. Jacob was working in Saltaire Mills as a weaver.

Jacob, a warp twister, married Margaret Ann Brook 18 May 1867 at Kirkgate Wesleyan Chapel in Bradford. They had eight children with two dying as infants. Their daughter Alice died 28 April 1878 aged just four. Their son, Thomas Arnold, died 18 May 1884 aged just 11 months The six surviving children were:

Walter born 1869, Edna 1871, Fred 1875, Norman, 1878, Maud 1881, and Ethel Margaret 1886.

In 1871 & 1881 they were living at 13 Titus Street, Saltaire.

Report from the Bradford Daily Telegraph 19 July 1872: -

Anti-Vaccination Cases at the Bradford Court House

A somewhat unusual series of cases came before the West Riding Magistrate at Bradford this afternoon, and the attitude and utterances of the defendants caused no small amount of excitement.

It seems that the vaccinating officer for Saltaire has determined upon seeing the act for vaccination put in force in that place, and in the discharge of his duty brought a number of men to court who refused, after legal warnings had been given, to have their children vaccinated. The cases were called successively, but for the sake of brevity we give them together.

The names of the men were Anderson Dunford, Jacob and Isaac Sanctuary, Joseph Armitage, and James Black, all respectable tradesmen of Saltaire.

They all pled guilty to the charge, and upon being asked what they had to say, each – with the exception of Dunford who had brought a friend named Jonathan Mitchell, armed with a copy of the act and sundry other documents, to speak for him – protested upon the unrighteousness of the law, the inability of vaccination to prevent an attack of smallpox, and the iniquity of their being summoned under the provision of the act.

Dunford, when told by the magistrates that “his friend” could not address the bench on his behalf, waxed eloquent and oratorical. He declared that he would “hold himself guilty before high heaven” if he acted according to the law in question.

Jacob Sanctuary “could not allow his child to be vaccinated;” and his brother Isaac “had never placed himself in opposition to the laws of his country; there was no man would charge him with want of care for his child’s welfare, but it was to the end that their welfare should be secured that he could not submit to this law with a clear conscience, no matter under what penalty.”

Joseph Armitage “refused to have his children tainted with disease;” and James Black, the most eloquent of the defendants, said he had been “a fearful sufferer from the ravages of vaccination in the persons of vaccination in the persons of two of his beloved children, one of whom had died of putridity occasioned by the vile stuff.”

The magistrates were there to administer the law in spite of the prejudices of the accused, who inveighed so loudly against it, fined them each 20s and costs or one month in default, and warned them against the folly of persisting in a course of conduct which rendered them liable to a fine of 20s for each day they refused to comply with the provisions of the act.

Report from the Shipley Times 2 September 1876: -

Anti-Vaccinator

Jacob Sanctuary, residing at Saltaire, was summoned for neglecting to have his child vaccinated

Mr. Wm. Booth, the vaccination officer, stated that the defendant's child was ten months old, and witness had served defendant with two notices, on the 12th of April and the 2nd of June, respectively. He had failed to comply with these notices, and the witness was compelled to summon him. He had already been summoned for a similar offence in the ease of another child. On serving the notices the defendant gave no reason for not having the child vaccinated, and as far as he knew it was in a fit state.

The defendant, who did not appear, was ordered to comply with the notice of the vaccination officer within fourteen days and pay the costs, 13s.; in default ten days' imprisonment.

In April 1878 Jacob is reported as being on the committee to raise funds for a testimonial to Miss Wade, the late head mistress of the Saltaire Infant School.

Report from the Shipley Times 22 May 1880: -

Offence Against The Vaccination Act

Jacob Sanctuary, Titus Street, Saltaire, was charged with refusing to have his child vaccinated, and an order was made that he should comply with the law within 14 days.

Report from the Shipley Times 2 December 1882: -

Refusing to Vaccinate – James Midgley, Wycliffe Road, Shipley; Ezra Naylor, Albert Road, Saltaire; and Jacob Sanctuary, Titus Street, Saltaire, were summoned for not having their children vaccinated in obedience to the law. None of the defendants appeared. The neglect was proved by Mr. Booth, and an order for vaccination to be performed within 14 days was made in each case.

Death Notice in the Shipley Times 24 May 1884: -

On the 18th, aged 11 Months, Thomas Arnold, son of Jacob Sanctuary, Titus Street, Saltaire.

At the first annual meeting of the Shipley Liberal Association in January 1886, Jacob was elected to the Liberal Hundred. In 1891 & 1901 Jacob lived with his family at 75 George Street in Saltaire.

Report from the Shipley Times 28 October 1893: -

A meeting of the Shipley Division Liberal Association was held on Saturday, when Mr Thornton Pullan submitted report on revision work, which was considered to show satisfactory results. A letter was road from Mr Isaac Sanctuary, of Shipley, resigning his membership she Association. In his letter he stated that he had come to the conclusion that independent action through the Independent Labour Party was the only way in which justice could be obtained for the poor, and that this section of the community could hope for no redress from either the great capitalistic parties—Liberals and Tories. The resignation was accepted, and Mr Jacob Sanctuary, his brother, was elected to the vacant place.

In 1911 Jacob was living with his family at 21 George Street in Saltaire. By 1918 they had moved to 11 Ferrands Road in Shipley. Jacob’s wife, Margaret Ann, died 20 September 1919. She was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley By 1924 Jacob was living at 25 Ferrands Road.

Report in the Shipley Times 14 May 1932: -

A “Young” Man at 89 – Saltaire Octogenarians Active Life

Mr. Jacob Sanctuary, of 25 Ferrand Road, Shipley, celebrated his 89 th birthday on Thursday. Despite his years he is exceedingly active, can see, hear well, is a great reader, and a man with a young and up-to-date mind.

His physical agility is amazing and is the source of one of his favourite jokes. When younger people offer see him safely across the road, permits them to do so, and then says with a hearty chuckle; “Thank you; and now I will see you safely back.”

Mr. Sanctuary is a native of Norfolk and is one of a family of 14. When was aged seven, however, left Norfolk to come with his father to Cullingworth. At the age eight he went out seeking work his own account, and obtained employment as a half-timer, working three weeks for nothing.

Four years later he began work at the Saltaire Mills and remained there for 30 years.

He lived in one of the first cottages erected by the late Sir Titus Salt as part of his famous ideal village, and thus remembers the erection of all the public buildings and most of the houses in Saltaire. He was one of the first trustees of the Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel.

After leaving the Saltaire Mills he worked for many years in the twisting department of Mason’s Mill and did not definitely retire until about 12 years ago.

In politics he is a life-long Liberal and many years ago was a member of the executive committee of the Shipley Division Liberal Association.

In September 1934 Jacob attended a social function held by the Windhill Co-op Men’s Guild. Jacob was a honorary member of the Guild. Jacob died 15 September 1935.

Report from the Shipley Times 21 September 1935: -

Saltaire’s Oldest Inhabitant Dead

Believed to have been the oldest inhabitant of Saltaire, Mr. Jacob Sanctuary, aged 92, of Ferrands Road, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. Nutter, of Primrose Lane, Gilstead, Bingley, on Sunday.

Born in Norfolk in May 1843, was the son of a Wesleyan local preacher, who went to Cullingworth to work at the request of the cloth buyers doing business in his district.

Mr. Sanctuary started work in the village at the age of eight but went to Saltaire five years later at the time when Mr. (later Sir) Titus Salt was conducting his experiments with alpaca and mohair.

Mr. Sanctuary started in the spinning room and was later in the drawing and weaving rooms before going to Mason’s mill, from which he retired about ten years ago.

In his younger days Mr. Sanctuary was connected with the Saltaire Wesleyan Church, of which he was a trustee. For over sixty years he had been an active member of the Bradford and Saltaire New Church Society (Swedenborgian), Frizinghall. He also took a prominent part in the Saltaire Adult School movement. Mr. Sanctuary lost his wife about 15 years ago.

The funeral took place at Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley, on Wednesday. The Rev. Frank Hodson Rose (Minister of the Bradford and Saltaire New Church Society, Frizinghall) officiated.

The chief mourners were Mrs. Leather, Mr. Fred Sanctuary, Mr. Norman Sanctuary, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Nutter, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hyde, Mr. N. L. Leather, Miss Marjorie Leather, Mr. J. R. Sanctuary, Mr. B. Leather, Mrs. Flatley, Mr, W. Allison Sanctuary, Mrs. Sutcliffe and Mrs. Hullhouse.

Representing the Bradford and Saltaire New Church Society, Frizinghall, were Mr. T. G. Newboult, Mrs. Newboult, Miss Newboult, Mr. and Mrs. R. Turner, and Mr. G. Hardie.

The Windhill Co-operative Men's Guild was represented by Mr. Tom Johnson.

Mr. Tim Horsfall represented the Shipley Labour Party. Amongst personal friends present were Mr. Arthur Raistrick, Mr. R. Denison. Mr. and Mrs. F. Dickinson, Mr. George Buttle, Mr. Ben Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Campbell, Mr. H. M. Dawson (Bradford), Mrs. John Hyde. Messrs, Joshua Johnson, G. Gawthorpe, and J. Aveyard (colleagues of Mr. Sanctuary when he was employed at the mill of Messrs. Henry Mason (Shipley), Ltd., Victoria Works, Shipley). The funeral arrangements were carried out Messrs. William Stephenson & Son, undertakers, Saltaire.

 

Sayner, Henry
1864 – 26 March 1939

Henry Sayner was the daughter of John Sayner. John was born c1831 in Snaith, near Goole. John married Harriet Mortimer in 1854 in the district of York. In 1861 they were living at Flaxton near York with John working as a railway platelayer.

Henry, the second youngest of six children, was born 1864 in Skipton. His mother, Harriet died 1 st Qtr. 1869. His widowed father married a widow, Mary Clifton (nee Fothergill) at St Paul’s Shipley 31 May 1869.

In 1871 they were living at 44 Whitlam St in Saltaire. Mary died in 1873. John then married Frances Metham 28 January 1874 at St Paul’s Shipley.

In 1881 Henry was living with his sisters Elizabeth and Mary at 21 Fanny St in Saltaire. All three were worsted spinners. Henry was working at Saltaire Mills in May 1882 when he had an accident.

Report from the Shipley Times 27 May 1882 as follows: -

At about eleven o’clock on Friday morning a young man named Henry Sayner (18), a combing-overlooker at Saltaire Mills, was attempting to pick some waste off a combing machine roller, by stretching over while the roller was moving towards him and making a slip his left hand was caught between the two grooved rollers, and severely crushed. He was at once removed to Sir Titus Salt’s Hospital, where his injuries were at once attended to, and it was found that they were not of so serious a nature to necessitate amputation.

From around 1886 Henry worked for Henry Mason & Co Ltd, Shipley.

Henry married Clara Foulds 10 November 1888 in Bradford Cathedral. Clara was born in Saltaire in 1868. At the time of her marriage she was living with her family at 46 Titus Street. They had nine children including George Henry Sayner who served in WW1 and Ruby Sayner, who served in WW2.

In 1891 Henry was living with his family at 25 Titus Street. In 1901 they were living at 45 Titus St. By 1911 they had moved to 21 Maddocks Street in Shipley.

Henry & Clara sailed from Southampton aboard the SS Carmania, arriving in New York, 12 August 1928. They arrived back in Liverpool, 16 September 1929, aboard SS Scythia, having sailed from Boston.

From before 1934 they were living at 9 Albert Rd in Saltaire. Henry died 26 March 1939.

Report in Shipley Times 1 April 1939 as follows: -

A popular figure among the older generation of Shipley residents, Mr. Henry Sayner, aged 74, of 9 Albert Rd, Saltaire, a former inside manager for Henry Mason and Co., spinners, and manufacturers. Victoria Works, Shipley, died last weekend.

Mr. Sayner, who was associated with this firm for 38 years, retired in. 1924 owing to ill-health. He had been prominently associated with the Saltaire Angling Association since its inception and had held the offices of secretary and treasurer. He had also been secretary and treasurer of the Shipley Working Men’s Club and was a member of the New Prosperity Lodge of the I.O.O.F. (M.U.). He left a widow, three sons, and five daughters. The interment took place at Nab Wood Cemetery, on Wednesday.

In his will Henry left £615 10s 1d (worth c£40, 000 in 2020) to his widow, Clara.

Clara died in 1955 in Romsey, Hampshire.

 

Schofield, Sam
1 December 1883 – 20 June 1974

Scholfield, Sam - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Scholefield, Albert
22 December 1881 - 23 July 1897
(Name also recorded as Albert Schofield)  

Albert Scholefield was the son of Charles Scholefield. Charles was born c1857 in Bradford. He married Ruth Horsfall 10 June 1878 at Bradford Cathedral.

Albert, the middle child of three, was born 22 December 1881 in Bradford. He was baptised 28 May 1882 at St Philip's Girlington, Bradford. In 1891 they were living in Manningham with Charles working as an overlooker.

Albert died 23 July 1897. Report in the Shipley Times Saturday 31 July 1897 as follows:

FATAL ACCIDENT AT SALTAIRE

On Friday evening a fatal accident of a distressing character occurred at Saltaire, whereby a youth named Albert Schofield, 15 yean of age, who resided with his parents at 26 Jane Street, Saltaire lost his life.
It appears that after finishing his day's work, Schofield, who a jobber at the Saltaire Mill, in company with a companion named Arthur Wigglesworth, proceeded down the canal in the direction of Shipley, for the purpose of bathing. On returning towards home, the lads, with the intention of taking a short cut, ascended the wall which runs between the gasworks and the canal and from thence proceeded to climb on to the canal bridge. Wigglesworth went first and alighted safely in Victoria Road, but Schofield was less fortunate, and his foot slipping he fell into the towing-path.
He was picked up in an unconscious condition and removed to Sir Titus Salt's Hospital, where he died shortly before eleven o'clock the same evening.

THE INQUIRY

On Tuesday morning an inquest upon the body of the unfortunate youth was held at Sir Titus Salt's Hospital, before Mr Mill (deputy coroner for the district) and a jury of which Mr Wilcock Denby was chosen foreman.
Charles Schofield, managing overlooker in the spinning department at tbs Saltaire Mills, was the first witness. He stated that the deceased, who was 15 years of age, was his son, and worked as a jobber at Saltaire Mill. He had always had good health. Arthur Wigglesworth, a lad living at 38 Dove Street. Saltaire, said he was a millhand employed by the Saltaire Firm. On Friday night he and the deceased left the mill together and proceeded along the canal tide in the direction of Shipley to have a bathe. As they returned, they walked along a wall which runs between the gashouse and the canal, when deceased fell off the wall on to the towing-path whilst he was trying to climb on the canal bridge in order that he might get into Victoria Road. Witness stated that deceased's foot appeared to slip just as he was in the act of climbing up from the wall, and he fell a distance of about four yards, being rendered unconscious, Witness was then on the other side the bridge.
A Juror: Hadn't you previously gone the same way? Yes.
The Coroner: There was no "malaking" or anything of that kind?  No.
You were not near him when he fell? I had got over.
Mary Carroll, nurse at the hospital, said deceased was brought to that institution at about quarter to seven o'clock on Friday night in an unconscious condition, suffering from a fracture of the base of the skull. He never regained consciousness and died at a quarter to eleven o'clock the same night.
The Coroner, having reviewed the evidence, verdict of "accidently killed by falling," was returned. It was also agreed that the coroner write to Sir Titus Salt, Bart, Sons & Co., Limited, asking them to so guard the place as to prevent people climbing over.

 

Scholefield, Charles
c1857 - 1919
(Name also recorded as Charles Schofield)  

Charles Scholefield was the son of James Scholefield. Charles was born c1857 in Bradford. He married Ruth Horsfall 10 June 1878 at Bradford Cathedral. They had three children. In 1891 they were living in Manningham with Charles working as an overlooker. In July 1897 they were living at 26 Jane Street in Saltaire when Charles gave evidence at an inquiry into the death of his son, Albert Scholefield.

By 1901 Charles, an overlooker then a manager at Saltaire Mills, was living with his family at 26 Albert Road (renumbered 51) in Saltaire, where Charles would spend the rest of his life.

Report from Shipley Times 8 September 1900 as follows:

Charles Schofield, overlooker, Saltaire, was fined 1s. and costs for allowing his dog to run at large without either muzzle or name-collar on 24 August.

Charles died in 1919; his widow, Ruth, died in 1927.

 

Searle, Harry Leslie
30 May 1874 – 9 August 1954

Harry Leslie Searle was the son of Thomas Weston Searle. Thomas was born c1844 in Oxfordshire. He married Louisa Nicole 21 March 1868 at St Mark’s Kennington, Surrey. They had at least four children.

Harry was born 30 May 1874 in Camberwell, London. In 1881 they were living in Peckham. London with Thomas working as a commission agent.

Harry joined the Merchant Navy as a deck apprentice in 1890. In 1901 Harry was employed as a yardsman at Leeds Union School. Harry married Maud Jennings in December 1902 at Rosse Street Baptist Church in Shipley. Maud was born 21 January 1878, in 1901 she was living at 30 George Street in Saltaire. In September 1903 Harry chaired a meeting of the Shipley Clarion Fellowship. By 1906 Harry and his wife were living at 38 Victoria Road in Saltaire.

Report from the Shipley Times 29 June 1906: -

Mr. H. L. Searle of 38 Victoria Road Saltaire, writes: — “May I call attention to the fact that a Consumers’ Anti- Sweating League is being formed which proposes: -

l. To further educate the public as to the evils of sweating and its causes.

2. To promote early drastic legislation for its prevention as far as possible by legislation.

3. To encourage the substitution of fair conditions labour by establishing a system whereby sweated goods may be distinguished from those honestly produced and creating an effective demand for the latter.

Under the present conditions it is obvious that the sweating evil will have much time to intensify before the law can stop it, and it is proposed, as a first step, to discover means whereby the consumer (who is really the responsible party) may keep his hands clean.

Consumers Leagues are already established the United States, France, and Switzerland, and it is hoped that strong support will be given to the English leagues, so that immediate steps may be taken to mitigate the evils sweating.

In 1911 Harry was a manager of an export house living with his wife, with no children, at 38 Granville Road in Frizinghall. By 1918 they were living at 240 Bradford Road in Shipley; moving to 15 Dallam Road around 1928. In 1939 they moved to 12 Cunliffe Terrace in Bradford where Harry would spend the rest of his life.

In WW1 Harry served as a Commander with the Bradford City Volunteer Force.

He was secretary and musical director of the Saltaire Philharmonic Society and he sat on the Shipley Hospital Demonstration Committee. He was a freemason; initiated into the Lodge of Amity in December 1920. He was also a Buffalo, being a initiated as a member of the Glen View Lodge R.A.O.B. in October 1921.

Harry was a member of Northcliff Golf Club.

Report from the Shipley Times 8 August 1924: -

GOLF - MR. H. L. SEARLE’S FINE FORM.

In winning the Northcliffe Cup final on Saturday, Mr. H. L. Searle has achieved a dual distinction this season, for only few weeks ago carried off the Hudson Cup in connection with the Northcliffe Golf Club, Shipley. Mr. Searle has only been playing golf about a couple of years, the feat all the more remarkable.

In Saturday’s final, over 36 holes, his opponent was Mr. V. Knight Plunkett, the captain of the club, who conceded four strokes. At the end of the first round Mr. Searle was up, and eventually won 2 up.

Harry was secretary of Saltaire Mills from April 1918 to December 1926.

Report from the Shipley Times 7 January 1927:-

Mr. H. L. Searle, secretary to Salt’s (Saltaire). Limited, terminated his engagement with that firm Friday 31 December. Mr. Searle was appointed to the position in April 1918, and during his connection with the firm has been immensely popular with the workpeople. He has also taken a great interest in the employees' welfare and had been a keen supporter of the Sports’ Association. Before his appointment at Saltaire Mills. Mr. Searle acted in a similar capacity for Guevera Limited. Great Horton, Bradford.

Report from the Shipley Times 21 January 1927: -

What was described as the managers’ farewell social to Mr. H. L. Searle, who recently terminated his connection as secretary to Salt’s (Saltaire Limited) was held at the small Social Room of the Saltaire Institute on Friday evening, when Mr. Searle was presented with a roll top desk and revolving chair, the parting gifts of the managers and employees of Saltaire Mills .

Report from the Shipley Times 24 December 1927: -

Mr. H. L. Searle, formerly secretary of Salt's Saltaire Ltd., has been appointed the directorate of The Filature Francaise Mohair Company, which has recently been constituted with capital of 20,000,000 francs into shares of 500 francs each. The registered offices are situated at 29, Rue de Chatesudun, Paris, and the object of the company is the manufacture of mohair and alpaca.

Harry died 9 August 1954. Report from the Shipley Times 11 August: -

Death of a Former Secretary of Salts Mr. H. L. Searle. Of Cunliffe Terrace, Bradford, a former secretary and manager of Salts Saltaire Ltd., died on Monday at the age of 80. Mr. Searle was on the staff at Salts for about ten years. He was a native of Surrey and became an officer in the merchant navy before he began his commercial career. A few years before the outbreak of the last war he founded a mohair spinning firm in France, for which he took a number of employees from the Bradford district. Until he retired, he looked after the firm’s business in the Bradford area. Mr. Searle was formerly a Freemason in the Amity Lodge in Shipley. The funeral is to take place on Thursday afternoon, when there is to be a service at Scholemoor Crematorium.

His widow Maud died 4 January 1958.

 

Sedgley, Henry Edward
2 July 1876 – 27 November 1957

Henry Edward Sedgley was the son of Leonard Sedgley. Leonard was born c1843 in Stow on the Wold, Gloucestershire. He married Sarah Jane Cleveley 26 July 1865 at Lower Guiting, Gloucestershire. In 1871 Leonard was a groom & gardener living with his family at Broadwell, Gloucestershire.

Henry was born 2 July 1876 in Idle, Yorkshire. He was baptised 6 May 1877 at Holy Trinity, Idle. In 1881 the family were living at Willowfield Lodge, Idle, where Leonard was a coachman. Leonard died in 1883.

Widow Sarah married William Thompson 31 October 1886 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1891 Henry was a doffer living with his mother and step-father in Baildon. Henry married Louisa Rushworth 4 July 1900.

Report from the Shipley Times 7 July 1900: -

On Wednesday afternoon a marriage was solemnized at St Paul’s Church, the contracting parties being Mr Henry Sedgley, of Baildon, and Miss Louisa Rushworth, youngest daughter of Mr John Rushworth, painter of Kirkgate, Shipley.

The bridesmaids were Miss Rushworth (sister of the bride), and Miss Sedgley (sister of the bridegroom), and Mr E. Sedgley was best man. The marriage ceremony was performed by the Rev A.W. Cribb (vicar) and appropriate music was played by Mr B. Firth (organist of the church).

Henry worked as a cloth finisher at Saltaire Mills. They had a son, Harry, born 29 April 1903. Louisa died in 1903. Widower Henry married Mackary Whitaker 23 April 1905 at St John’s Baildon. They had a daughter, Carrie, born 25 November 1905. Mackary died in 1905.

In 1911 Henry and his children were living with his married sister, Mary Louisa Halliday, and her family at 19 Constance Street in Saltaire. Henry married Sarah Hannah Griffiths 3 rd Qtr. 1911. Sarah was a weaver living at 13 Shirley Street, she was born 4 July 1872 in Shincliffe, County Durham.

By 1918 they were living at 17 (renumbered 33) Albert Road in Saltaire. Henry died 27 November 1957.

Report from the Shipley Times 4 December 1957: -

A verdict of "death by misadventure" was recorded by the Craven District Coroner, Stephen E Brown at an inquest held in the Town Hall on Monday on Henry Edward Sedgley, 81, retired cloth finisher, of 33 Albert Road. Saltaire. who was found dead near a gas tap at his home on Wednesday 27 November 27

Dr. T. K. Marshall, consultant pathologist at Leeds University said that death was caused by carbon monoxide poisoning and heart failure.

Muriel Booth, 31, of Poplar Road, Windhill. a home help at Mr. Sedgley’s home, said she arrived at the house at 9.10 a.m. and found the back door closed but unlocked. Mr. Sedgley was in the habit of lighting the fire in a morning always using the gas poker. But she found the fire set for lighting, the gas tap on, the poker disconnected and Mr. Sedgley lying in a comer with his legs doubled under him and his head resting on the skirting board. A small chair he used to sit in was partially on top of him.

Mrs. Booth said he did not have a good sense of smell and he was very forgetful. There were times when he forgot to turn off the gas poker.

“I pulled him out as far as I could and I climbed on the table to try and open a window but I could not and I called to the lady next door then went to get the doctor who told call the ambulance." said Mrs. Booth.

Herbert Hall, of 15 Earl Street, Shipley, an ambulance driver, said that when he arrived at the home of the deceased, he found him unconscious and applied breathing apparatus. He seemed to respond. Artificial respiration was continued in the ambulance but when they reached Bradford Royal Infirmary, a doctor told him that Mr. Sedgley was dead.

Harry Sedgley, of 416 Huddersfield Road. Wyke. cafe proprietor and son of the deceased, said his mother was in hospital. His father had not had a good sense of smell for a long while, but he had no reason to think that his father would take his own life.

The Coroner produced a note Mr. Sedgley left his home help containing instructions to the home help and arrangements for food. Seven words at the end of the note read "Last word to my dear wife Sally". Asked if knew what was meant by that Mr. Sedgley said he had been unable make the writing out.

Mrs. Annie Boardman. of 31 Albert Road, next-door neighbour to the deceased, said that four times in the last twelve months she had smelled gas coming from Mr. Sedgley's house and had tell him about it

Recalled, Mrs. Booth said that regarding the words on the note "Last word to my dear wife", they might interpreted as "Last ward to dear wife" as she had been moved a different ward in the hospital when last he went to see her, and he had been unable to find her.

After P.C. Lewis had described his visit to the house and how he had found the gas poker disconnected. the Coroner said that there was evidence show that the deceased took his own life and that the suggestion in the note was not sufficient to show that the deceased had taken his own life and he recorded the verdict of “death by misadventure caused by coal gas poisoning and heart failure.

 

Senior, John
c1851 - 4 July 1920

John Senior was the son of Joseph Senior. Joseph was born c1824 in Leeds. He married Jane Holmes 10 August 1845 at St Peter's Leeds.

John, the third eldest of nine children, was born c1851 in Sheffield. In 1851 they were living in Ecclesfield with Joseph working as a cordwainer. In 1871 they were living at 53 George Street in Saltaire with Joseph employed as a labourer and John was a wool sorter.

John married Ann Gill 29 July 1871 at Bradford Cathedral. They had three children. By 1881 they were living at 23 Westgate in Shipley. Ann died in 1898. In 1879 John took over the stationary business of Mr Robert Barnett on his death. John moved the shop from Briggate to Westgate.

In October 1881 John lost his younger brother Joseph who, as a fisherman, drowned at sea.  Widowed John married Alice Eastwood, fifteen years younger than him, 5 October 1898 at Christchurch, Windhill. They had two children. John died 4 July 1920.

Report from the Shipley Times 9 July 1920 as follows: -

The death occurred at the Saltaire Hospital, on Sunday, following an operation, of Mr John Senior, bookseller and stationer, of Westgate, Shipley, at the age 69.
Mr. Senior, who was a well-known and highly respected Shipley tradesman, was a native of Hull. At the age of 17 he came to Shipley with his parents and entered Saltaire Mills as an apprentice to the wool sorting. At the age of 24, however, he started in business as a bookseller and stationer, which he continued up to the date of his death.
In politics, he was a Liberal, with strong tendencies towards Socialism. He was a staunch teetotaller and a non-smoker, and he held strong religious convictions. He did good work among all denominations, being a non-sectarian. Mr. Senior was a local preacher from the age of 17, and strong advocate of temperance.  He was also connected with various organisations in the town, being secretary of the Rosse Street Brotherhood, secretary of the Fame House Holiday Fund, and he served on the committee of the Guild of Help and the Workers' Educational Association. He was also connected with the Saltaire Adult School, being this year's president-elect for the Bradford District Adult School Union, and he was honorary member of the Rosse Street Veterans. Mr. Senior leaves a widow, four sons and one daughter.
Following a service at the Rosse Street Baptist Church, the funeral took place at Nab Wood Cemetery on Wednesday (7 July).

 

Shackleton, Fred
c1867 – April 1930

Fred Shackleton was the son of Joseph Shackleton. Joseph was born in 1844 in Clayton (near Bradford). He married Mary Ann Lingard, 2 June 1866, at Bradford Cathedral.

Fred was born c1867 in Queensbury. The family lived in Queensberry where Joseph worked as a twister. By 1881 Fred was working as a spinner.

Fred married Annie Town (b1876) in 1899 in Halifax. They had four children with one dying as in infant. In 1911 they were living in Queensbury with Fred employed as a spinning overlooker, later working at Saltaire Mills. Fred died in April 1930.

Report from the Shipley Times 12 April 1930: -

LATE MR. F. SHACKLETON. The funeral of Mr. Fred Shackleton, of 3 Albert Road, Saltaire, on Tuesday, attracted a large crowd workpeople from Saltaire Mills, despite the inclement weather. Mr. Shackleton, who was 63 years of age, had occupied the post of manager of the twisting and reeling departments for 16 years, and he was one of the most popular managers in the mill.

He was a native of Queensbury, at one time being secretary the Loyal Industry Lodge of the Independent Order Oddfellows, The funeral look place at Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley, the service being conducted by the Rev. R. S. McHardy.

Salt’s (Saltaire) Ltd., was represented by Capt. S. B. Brierley (secretary), who also represented the directors of the mill, Messrs, F. Hartley (cashier), R. W. Hartley (wool buyer), Mr. E. Garrett (mill manager), D. M. Reid (manager, matchings department), J. C. Lee (yarn department), J. Sykes (burling and mending), F. W. Hanson (combing), J. A. Farndale (drawing), Stead (weaving), O. Dennison (spinning), J. Walker (foreman. winding department), and a number of overlookers, including Messrs. A. Brown, O. G. Jenkins, E. Scott and F. Berry.

 

Shackleton, Sam

Shackleton, Sam - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Sharpe, Walter Edwin

Sharpe, Walter Edwin - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Simpson, Arthur

Simpson, Arthur - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Slinger, Harold

Slinger, Harold - WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Smith, Francis Emery

Smith, Francis Emery - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Smith, Harold

Smith, Harold WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Smith, Maud Hodgson nee Wilson
21 June 1895 - 24 December 1955

Maud Hodgson Wilson was born 21 June 1895 in Baildon. In 1911 she was a spinner and a boarder at 7 Hanson Street in Shipley. She remained there until she married George Smith in 1926. They lived all their married life at 1 Higher School Street in Saltaire.

Maud worked at Saltaire Mills. In 1939 she was a cap twister. Maud retired from work in 1955.  She died 24 December 1955 after being knocked down on a zebra crossing on Bingley Road.  

[Compiled with the help of Carolyn Jozefek, granddaughter of Maud & George, with many thanks.]

 

Speak, Savannah
11 August 1832 – 1895

Savannah Speak was the son of William Speak. William was born 6 May 1805 in Sowerby. He married Mary Clegg, 24 September 1829, in Halifax.

Savannah, the second of 7 children, was born 11 August 1832 in Sowerby. He was baptised 7 November 1832 at Sowerby Green Old Chapel (Independent).

In 1841 the family were living in Sowerby. Mary died in 1844. In 1851 widowed William lived with his children in Manningham. Both William and Savannah worked as warp dressers. William died in 1852

Savannah married Annie Speight, 17 December 1859, at St Peter’s, Birstall. They had five children. In 1861 the family were living at 1a Caroline Street in Saltaire. In 1871 & 1881 they were at 41 Caroline Street.

The following is an article from the Shipley Times 15 January 1881: -

About ten o'clock, on Tuesday night, Savannah Speak, a warp-dresser, employed at Saltaire Mills, and who also acts as a gamekeeper for Mr. Charles Stead, had a narrow escape from being killed at Saltaire Station. It appears that he had gone to see a man off to Keighley, by the 9-45 train from Bradford, which was standing in the station. Just as the 9-15 train from Skipton was coming in both men attempted to cross the line in front of the uptrain. Speak, however, was caught by the engine and knocked down. His head and face being severely cut, and his collar bone broken. He was immediately conveyed to his home, and Dr. Ellis called in, and he is now progressing as well as can be expected. It is stated that both men were under the influence of drink.

Savannah survived and in 1883 they were living at 8 George Street in Saltaire when their youngest child, John George, died aged just eight. In1891 Savannah was an overlooker living alone at 12 Albert Terrace in Saltaire. His wife and three of their children were living at Potter Newton in Leeds.

Savannah died in 1895; his wife, Annie, having died in 1892.

Their third child, Savannah Johnson Speak, was an English mining engineer and metallurgist.

 

Spencer, Sam

Spencer, Sam - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Steel, Hartley
10 June 1889 - 1961

Hartley Steel was the son of Joseph Robinson Steel. Joseph was born c1843 in Enfield, Lancashire. He married Sarah Ann Whitaker 15 July 1883 at Holy Trinity Bingley.

Hartley, the middle child of three, was born 10 June 1889 in Bingley. The family lived in Bingley with Joseph employed as a worsted overlooker. Hartley married Lily Hobson 20 December 1923 at the Zion Chapel in Bingley. They had a son, Winston, born 15 October 1914. Working at Saltaire Mills, Hartley did not serve in WW1.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 17 May 1918 as follows: -

Sixty-eight cases from Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons and Co., Ltd., Saltaire, were disposed of last Friday night by the Shipley Tribunal. Coun. T. Hill, J.P., presiding.
Postponements to various dates were given to the following (including) Hartley Steel,29, married, Grade 2, weaving overlooker.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 20 June 1919 as follows: -

An examination of the employees of Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons, and Co., Ltd., Saltaire Mills, who recently attended a course of ambulance instruction at the Cafe, Saltaire, has resulted as follows: -Passed 2nd Examination (Voucher): -Hartley Steel.

By 1917 they were living at 10 Lockwood Street in Saltaire. They remained there until they emigrated to America in 1923. They departed from Liverpool, heading for Boston 7 April 1923 aboard SS Carmenia. They lived in Methuen, Massachusetts. Whilst there they had a daughter, Doreen, born 30 December 1924.

They returned to live in Bingley in 1932, arriving in Liverpool from Boston 29 May 1932 aboard SS Britannic. In 1939 they were living at 9 Gloucester Road in Bingley. Hartley died in 1961; Lily died in 1962.

 

Stenhouse, Alexander Fisher
1888 – 6 November 1935

Alexander Fisher Stenhouse was born 1888 in Scotland to Hugh Stenhouse and Mary Fisher.

Alexander married Lucy Young Johnstone. They had two sons, Hugh, and Archie. In 1914 they were living at 2 Leyburn Grove in Shipley. They moved to 6 (re-numbered 11) Albert Road in Saltaire around 1918.

Report from the Shipley Times 23 October 1925 as follows:

A complimentary dinner was given at the Rosse Hotel, Shipley, on Monday evening to Mr. A. Fisher Stenhouse, on the eve of his departure for Australia.

For the past 11 years Mr. Stenhouse has been head of the “C” department of Salts (Saltaire). Ltd., but recently relinquished that post to take up an important position as head large manufacturing concern in Australia.

A native of Galashiels, Mr. Stenhouse was educated at Knowepark School, at Selkirk, and after occupying responsible positions with Messrs, Gibson & Lungair, of Selkirk (where his late father was head designer for many years), and later at Huddersfield, he was appointed to his late position at Salts.

The employees of Mr. Stenhouse's department in that firm recently presented him with diamond ring as token the general respect in which is held.

Mrs. Stenhouse and their two sons will accompany Mr. Stenhouse to Australia.

Alexander and his family sailed from London bound for Sydney aboard the SS Narkunda 23 October 1925.

SS Narkunda

Report from the Goulburn Evening Penny Post 8 December 1925: -

GOULBURN WOOLLEN MILLS

Arrival of the New Manager

The Goulburn Woollen Mills, after experiencing a number of adversities during the last twelve months, are at last on the way to success. The cloth manufactured by the Company has been very favourably received by the merchants of Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide, with the result that orders are coming in greater numbers than the Company, with its present limited working capital, can cope with.

Some time ago the Directors decided on the advice of two large

manufacturers, who were on a visit to Australia, to obtain the services of an of an expert manufacturer as manager.

Negotiations were begun with Mr. A. P. Stenhouse, Manager of

one of the Saltaire Mills in Yorkshire, with the result that an agreement was made by which Mr. Stenhouse would come to Australia and take charge, of the Company's works. He is now in Sydney and will take over his duties next week.

It is hoped that under the management of Mr. Stenhouse the Mills will work at fullest capacity possible with the amount of capital available, and that the confidence of, the public will be such that no difficulty will be experienced by the Directors in obtaining sufficient additional capital to make it possible for the mills to become one of the biggest successes in Australia secondary industries.

Goulburn is a regional city in the Southern Tablelands of the Australian state of New South Wales, approximately 195 kilometres (121 mi) south-west of Sydney, and 90 kilometres (56 mi) north-east of Canberra. It was proclaimed as Australia's first inland city through letters patent by Queen Victoria in 1863. Goulburn had a population of 23,835 at June 2018.

Report from the Sydney Morning Herald 16 March 1926: -

GOULBURN WOOLLEN MILLS.

The annual meeting of shareholders of the Goulburn Woollen Mills, was held at "Goulburn yesterday, our correspondent telegraphs.

Mr. C. E. Prell, chairman of directors, presided. A Summary of the balance-sheet appeared in in yesterday's Issue. Mr. Prell regretted that the directors were unable to present a more satisfactory balance-sheet, but said that with the new management they now had the directors felt confident many of the difficulties they had experienced in the past would not occur again. The directors had every reason to believe that in spite of the figures on the balance-sheet, the mills would soon progress and become a paying proposition. They were at a disadvantage in not having sufficient working capital, for they could sell in a month all the cloth they could produce in twelve months. The report and balance-sheet were adopted.

The new manager, Mr. Stenhouse, gave a resume of the

activities at the mills since he had taken over. He said he had found the plant very small. There were only 26 looms, and It was most essential that additional looms should be purchased, for with the same number of operatives they could run four times the number of looms, and therefore increase their output

fourfold. The fact that increased duty had been put on English cloth meant a much bigger demand for Australian cloth, so there was no reason why the mills should not become a paying concern.

Messrs. W. D. Gordon and J. Garry were re-elected directors, and Mr. Prell was re-elected chairman of directors, and Messrs. Christie and Adams were re-elected auditors.

Report from the Sydney Daily Telegraph 12 August 1926: -

GOULBURN. — Mr. J. W. Middle brook has resigned from the position of managing director of the Goulburn Woollen Mills, and Mr. A. F. Stenhouse has resigned the position of manager. Mr. C. E. Prell Is now managing director.

In 1931 they were living in Brighton, a suburb of Melbourne in Victoria.

Alexander died 6 November 1935 in Kew, Melbourne.

 

Stenson, Edward

Stenson, Edward - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Stockdale, Olive (nee Llewellyn)
17 November 1903 – 14 May 1970

Olive Llewellyn was the daughter of James Llewellyn. James was born 26 March 1880 in Millom, Cumberland. He married Esther Steele 13 October 1901 at Holy Trinity church in Millom. James & Esther had seven children all born in Millom, who would all eventually work in Saltaire Mill.

John Charles (1902-1957) 3 Lapstone Road
Olive (1903-1970) 3 Lapstone Road
Frank (1905-1963) 20 Devonshire Road
James (1906-1984) 17 Lapstone Road
Amy (1907-1985) 17 Lapstone Road
Esther (1915-2001) 17 Lapstone Road
Dorothy (1917-1991) 17 Lapstone Road

Olive, their second child, was born 17 November 1903 at 3 Lapstone Road in Millom. In 1911 the family were living at 17 Lapstone Road, where James was an iron ore miner.

Click to magnify


Image: The Llewellyn children.

Olive attended Lapstone Road School, where she passed examinations in needlework & composition. She also attended the Wesleyan Sunday School.

In 1919, Olive moved with her family to Saltaire where she worked in Saltaire Mill. In 1919 she lived with her parents at 2 Edward Street (originally 7 Bath Buildings). From 1920 they were at 26 George Street. Olive, along with her siblings, was a member of Saltaire Mills Gymnastic Club.

Olive, a reeler, married Herbert Stockdale, a leather belt maker, 15 August 1925 at St. Paul’s Shipley. Herbert was born 24 December 1901 in Hull to William Stockdale & Sarah Elizabeth Baker. Olive & Herbert didn't have any children.

In the 1939 Register, Olive & Herbert were living at 8 High Busy Lane in Shipley. They were still living there in 1960. They were living at 18 Dove Street in Saltaire, when Olive died 14 May 1970; she was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley. Herbert died in the same house 24 December 1982; he was buried alongside Olive.

(Compiled with the help of John Rolfe-Dickinson, a grandson of James & Esther.)

 

Stolworthy, Henry
18 October 1840 – 19 February 1928

Henry Stolworthy was the son of John Stolworthy. John was born 31 December 1798 in Norwich. He married Maria Storey 24 September 1920 at St Saviour’s, Norwich.

Henry, the second youngest of nine children, was born 18 October 1840 at Fetwell in Norfolk. By 1844 the family had moved to West Yorkshire. In 1851 they were living in Bradford with John working as an alpaca worker and Henry an errand boy. John died in 1867; Maria in 1876.

Henry, a joiner, married Fanny Briggs 5 February 1859 at Bradford Cathedral. They had three children. In 1861 they were living at 10 Amelia Street in Saltaire. Fanny died in 1869 and was buried in St Paul’s churchyard, Shipley 20 October 1869.

Widowed Henry married Betsy Longbottom 22 May 1870 at Bradford Cathedral. They had no children. From 1871 they were living at 10 Gordon Terrace (re-numbered 69 Bingley Road) in Saltaire. By 1901 they had moved to 49 Caroline Street. Betsy died 7 February 1916 and was buried at Nab Wood Cemetery in Shipley.

By 1918 Henry was living at 13 Ashley Road in Shipley, Henry died in Salt’s Hospital 19 February 1928. He was buried at Nab Wood alongside Betsy. In his will he left £621 10s 11d (worth c£39k in 2019) to Mary Ann White and Robert Henry Facey.

Report from the Shipley Times 25 February 1928 as follows: -

The death took place at Saltaire Hospital on Sunday, after a few weeks’ illness, of Mr. Henry Stolworthy, 13 Ashley Road, Shipley. He was in his 98th year, and he was a well-known and highly respected resident.

A native of Feltwell, Norfolk, Mr. Stolworthy came to Bradford at an early age, and was one the original employees of Saltaire Mills, which were founded by the late Sir Titus Salt. For upwards of 28 years Mr. Stolworthy was employed at Saltaire Mills, first in the joinery department, and later as the machine toolmaker. His practical knowledge of building, likewise, proved of great value, and the designs the new board room at Clayton Institution were built according to his ideas. While at Saltaire Mills Mr. Stolworthy was for several years Superintendent of the Fire Brigade, and long after his retirement he regularly attended the children’s annual treat, and by his jovial and genial manner proved himself quite a host amongst the juveniles. When he left Saltaire Mills Mr. Stolworthy received a testimonial from the firm, in recognition his long and faithful services.

For upwards of 20 years Mr. Stolworthy had taken an active interest as a Shipley representative on the North Bierley Guardians, and for one period was chairman of that body, while he was also member the Farm Sub- Committee. The Christmas dinner to the inmates was function which he greatly enjoyed attending and despite his advanced age he walked from Shipley Clayton Institution as recently a year ago last Christmas.

The Shipley Veterans' Association claimed him one of their own. was chairman of the Association of the time of his death, and he took a personal interest in the various members of the Association. A keen sportsman, he was a regular player in the annual cricket matches organised by the Association in aid of Saltaire Hospital.

Few people who knew his familiar figure in the Shipley district would have guessed Mr. Stolworthy’s age correctly, and his upright bearing would have done credit to many a younger man. He was a staunch Liberal, and for many years connected with the West Ward Liberal Club.

 

Storey, Wilton Sadler
5 October 1889 - 30 March 1975

Wilton Sadler Storey was the son of Thomas Sadler Storey. Thomas was born 1 November 1856 in Northallerton. He married Sarah Ann Broadley, 3 January 1880, at St John the Baptist in Halifax. In 1881 & 1891 they were living in Norwood Green, Hipperholme cum Brighouse with Thomas working as a nursery gardener.

Wilton, the second youngest of seven children, was born 5 October 1889 in Norwood Green, Halifax. The family moved to Shipley in 1893 living at 4 Jennings Street. From 1898 to 1906 they lived at 5 Amelia Street in Saltaire, then they moved to 49 George Street. Thomas was a nursery gardener.

Wilton, a weaving overlooker in Salts Mill, married Hannah May Emsley in 1914. They had a daughter, Muriel, born in 1920. They lived at 15 Salisbury Street in Shipley from 1918 to 1926; at 56 Pratt Lane from 1928 to 1934. From 1934 they lived at 8 Norwood Avenue.

In 1930 William was working as a weaver in Poland. In 1942 he was a weaving manager working in Egypt. His daughter, Muriel, married Edward Vallance Cook, in Egypt, 6 June 1942.

Wilton's wife, Hannah, died 2 October 1949 in Shipley. Wilton died 30 March 1975 at Willerby in North Humberside.

Wilton had a brother, Lionel Norris Storey, who served in WW1.

 

Stringer, John Edgar
26 October 1882 – 24 January 1969

John Edward Stringer was the son of Samuel Stringer. Samuel was born 1857 in Kirkheaton, near Huddersfield. He married Mary Elizabeth Mallinson, 8 September 1880, at St. John’s, Kirkheaton. They had eight children, but two died in infancy.

John, their eldest child, was born 26 October 1882 in Kirkheaton. He was baptised 7 October 1883 at St. John’s church. In 1891 & 1901 the family were living in Kirkheaton where Samuel was a worsted cloth designer. In 1901 John was an electrical engineering apprentice.

By 1911 they had moved to 5 Leyburn Grove in Shipley where John was an assistant electrical engineer. John married Minnie Cryer, 11 September 1912, at St. Paul’s Shipley. They had a son, Bernard, born 27 June 1913. In April 1917, as chief engineer at Saltaire Mills, he was excused serving in WW1 by the Shipley Military Tribunal. John was a member of St. Peter’s Church, Shipley. With his family he lived at 35 (renumbered 69) Albert Road, from before 1918 until around 1955.

In November 1934 John supervised the installation of a huge 4,000 kilowatt turbo-alternator at Saltaire Mills.

Minnie died at home, 18 February 1955. She was buried in Hirst Wood Cemetery, Shipley, four days later. Living in Liversedge, John died 24 January 1969 at St. Luke’s Hospital, Bradford. He was buried alongside his wife 30 January. In his will John left £5,238.

 

Stuart, Fred Ernest
1 September 1865 – 10 June 1961

Ernest Stuart was the son of Matthew Stuart. Matthew was born c1831 in Guiseley. He married Martha Dibb, 31 May 1859, at All Saints, Otley

Ernest, the fourth of eight children, was born 1 September 1865 at Guiseley. He was baptised 5 November 1865 at St Oswald’s, Guiseley. They lived in Guiseley in 1861 & 1871 with Matthew employed as a weaver. By 1881 they were living at 31 Barrett Street in Shipley with Matthew working as an insurance agent. By 1891 they had moved to 23 Barrett Street.

Ernest married Sarah Elizabeth Scott in 1891. They had three sons; Cyril Scott Stuart born 24 March 1898, Arthur Stuart born 1901, and Ernest Winton Stuart born 28 July 1905.

Report in the Shipley Times 8 October 1898: -

STUART BROS., LIMITED – This company has been registered, with a capital of £10,000 in £1 shares, to acquire and take over as a going concern the business carried on by Harry G. Stuart, William D. Stuart, and Ernest Stuart, at Saltaire, and to carry on the business of spinners and manufacturers of silk noils and silk waste, cleaning-cloth makers, grease extractors, waster pullers, &c. The subscribers, one share each, are: -

Harry G. Stuart, 11 Ostler Road, manufacturer
William D. Stuart, 5 Glenview Terrace, manufacturer
Ernest Stuart, 33 Albert Road, manufacturer
Mrs. Maria Stuart, 11 Ostler Road
Mrs. Sarah E. Stuart, 5 Glenview Terrace
Mrs. Martha Stuart, 23 Barrett Street
Mrs Sarah E. Stuart, 33 Albert Road.

The number of directors is not to be less than three nor more than seven. The first are Harry G. Stuart, William D.Stuart, and Ernest Stuart; qualification ten shares; renumeration as fixed by the company.

By 1901 they were living at 33 Albert Road (re-numbered 65) in Saltaire.

Report from the Shipley Times 25 April 1902 as follows: -

An inquiry was held on Monday afternoon at Sir Titus Salt’s Hospital, by Mr Coroner B. H. Hill and a jury, into the circumstances attending the death of Arthur Stuart, aged 14 months.

The first witness called was Annie Stuart, who deposed that she was the mother of the deceased, and lived at 33 Albert Road, Saltaire. She was the wife of Ernest Stuart, who was employed as clerk at Saltaire Mills. The child had always been healthy and strong up to Thursday, when he didn’t seem to be so well. However, they thought it was on account of his teeth. On Friday he had a slight cough and was a bit feverish. He went to bed about 10.30 and passed a good night, waking up at the usual times for his food. The last time he awoke was about 6.30 on Saturday morning, when he was fed as usual, and was laid down on bis back and went to sleep again. When she (the witness) woke up again at about 20 minutes to eight she looked at him and he was just in the same position as she had laid him, but she saw at once that he was dead. She sent for Dr. Eames at once.

Dr. Charles Wm Eames said he was present at the child’s birth and attended it for a few days, but he had not seen the child since, until after its death. He was called in on Saturday morning, and on examining the deceased saw that he had not been dead long. His tongue was between his teeth, and his gums were swollen. He made a post-mortem examination of the body, and had found no decided indication of the cause of death, but there were indications that there had been great pressure on the tongue by the teeth, and this had probably caused convulsions, which were principally due to the nervous system. —A verdict in accordance with the doctor's evidence was returned.

By 1911 the family were living at 8 Bradford Road in Shipley. Sarah died at this address 8 January 1943; she was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery in Shipley. Ernest, living at Ellerkin, Beech Street, Bingley died 10 June 1961 at 149 Heights Lane, Daisy Hill, Bradford and was buried alongside his wife. In his will he left £3,807 8s 6d (worth c£85k in 2019) to his sons, Cyril Scott Stuart, and Ernest Winton Stuart.

 

Sunderland, Ben
10 Mar 1870 - 1951

Ben Sunderland was the son of George William Sunderland. George was born c1836 in Haworth.  He married Susannah Hemingway in 1859. They lived in Bradford where George worked as a stuff packer.

Ben, the fifth of seven children, was born 10 March 1870 in Bradford. He was baptised 13 April 1870 at Bradford Cathedral. Ben working as an overlooker married Amy Ogden 17 April 1897 at Bradford Cathedral. They had two daughters: - Bertha born 7 April 1902 and Hilda 7 April 1902.

In 1911 the family were living in Darlington, County Durham, moving to 30 (renumbered 59) Albert Road n Saltaire in1918.

In July 1920 Ben, an overlooker in the combing department at Saltaire Mills, gave evidence at a court case regarding a raid on the mill.

By 1928 they were living at 12 Gaisby Lane, Shipley. Ben’s wife Amy died in 1935. In 1939 widower Ben was retired, living with his married daughter, Hilda Pullan, in Thirsk, North Yorkshire. Ben died in Thirsk in 1951.


Sutton, John
c1861 –????

John was born c1861 in Birmingham. He married Sarah Louisa Line, 30 September 1883, at Bitterswell in Leicestershire. In 1891 they were living in Haworth, Yorkshire. John was a carter. They had three daughters before they had their only son.

By 1901 the family had moved to Saltaire, living at 5 Shirley Street. John was a carter at the woollen mill, where his two eldest daughters also worked. By 1911 they had moved to 27(renumbered 53) Albert Road. John was a horse driver at the mill; his three daughters were all weavers at the mill. Their son John Edward, aged 12, was a scholar and part time spinner. He lost his life serving his country in WW1.

By 1918 John and his family were living at 7 Melbourne Street, Shipley.

Report from the Shipley Times 7 October 1933: -

GOLDEN WEDDING

Mr. and Mrs. John Sutton, of 37 Westgate, Baildon, celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding on Saturday Mr. Sutton is native of Birmingham but came North when he was 22 years old to work for the L.M.S. railway as a porter at Haworth. Later, he worked at Saltaire Mills as carter for 17 years, and at the Scott Motor Cycle Works, Saltaire, as a packer. He retired seven years ago, at the age of 67.

Mrs. Sutton, who is 75, was horn at Sherington, in Buckinghamshire. They were married at Bitterswell Church, near Leicester, and there are three daughters and three grandchildren. The golden wedding celebrations will take the form of a family gathering.

 

Sykes, Arthur
c1874 - 26 November 1937

Arthur Sykes was the son of James William Sykes. James was born c1843 in Huddersfield. He married Mary Patchett 11 June 1872 at St John's Halifax.

Arthur, the eldest of three children, was born c1874 in Halifax. In 1881 they were living in Sowerby with James working as an overseer. In 1891 they were in Northowram with James working as a schoolmaster and Arthur as a wool combing overlooker. By 1901 they had moved to Queensbury.

Arthur married Martha Balmforth 24 April 1901 at Holy Trinity, Queensbury. They had at least two children. By 1911 they had moved to 15 Albert Road (renumbered 29) in Saltaire.

In July 1915 Arthur, of 17 Roberts Street, Windhill, as an under-manager in the combing dept. of Saltaire Mills, gave evidence at an inquest. By 1918 Arthur and his family were back in Saltaire, living at 36 Albert Road (renumbered 71).

In July 1920 Arthur was a manager in the woolcombing dept. when he gave evidence at a trial. By 1928 he was living with his family at 2 Redburn Drive in Shipley.

Arthur died 26 November 1937 and was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery Shipley. Martha joined him when she died 2 October 1954.


Sykes, James

Sykes, James - WW1 Roll of Honour


 

 

 

 

 
 
 
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