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Mill Workers who lived in Saltaire
Researched by Colin Coates
 

Surnames beginning with:

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

 
Ramsden, Harry Sutcliffe

Ramsden, Harry Sutcliffe - WW1 Roll of Honour

Ramsden, Jack

Ramsden, Jack - WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Raper, John Hodgson

Raper, John Hodgson - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Read, David Morris
23 June 1875 – 26 January 1951

David Morris Read was the son of David Read. David snr. was born in 1843 in Bradford. He married Phoebe Exley 5 November at St Peter’s Leeds. They had five children. In 1871 they were living in Calverley where David snr. was a weaver.

David was born 23 June 1875 in Windhill. In 1881 the family were living at 6 Herbert Street in Saltaire where David snr. was a mason’s labourer. David started working in Saltaire Mills around 1885. In 1891 they were living in 52 George Street with David snr. working as a labourer and David as a mill hand. By 1898 they were living at 18 (renumbered 35) Albert Road.

David married Mary Hannah Barrow 12 October 1898 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Saltaire. Mary worked at Saltaire Mills up to when she married. They had five children, including Harry and Frank, who both served in WW2. Their son George served in both WW1 and WW2.

David worked as a clerk then a matcher at Saltaire Mills and he lived with his family at 51 George Street in Saltaire; by 1918 they were living at 33 (renumbered 65) Albert Road

In October 1937 he is reported as being one of the long service workers who met King George VI and Queen Elizabeth when they visited Saltaire Mills.

Report from the Shipley Times 13 October 1948: -

SALTAIRE GOLDEN WEDDING

Mr. & Mrs. D. M. Rend – “I wish every married couple were as happy my wife and I have been." said Mr. David Morris Read, of 65. Albert Road, Saltaire, when a "Times Express" reporter called to see him at the Shipley Veterans' Rooms, Crowghyll Park, the other day. about his and Mrs. Read’s golden wedding anniversary, which they celebrated yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. Read, who are both 73 years of age, were married at Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel on October 12. 1898. They have had four sons and one daughter and have seven grandchildren. Their eldest son. Squadron Leader George Read, was killed whilst serving with the R.A.F. in the recent war.

Mr. Read has lived in Saltaire since infancy. He attended the Albert Road Schools as a boy. and. at the age of ten, began work as a half-timer Saltaire Mills. Anxious to improve himself, he attended evening classes and won a scholarship to the Technical Institute. He was transferred to the Counting House at the mill, and ultimately became a top matcher, which position Mr. Read held at the time of his retirement, five years ago. after 58 years’ service with the firm. A gift of an easy chair marked the appreciation of the directors of the mill for his work after over 50 years at Saltaire Mills.

But Mr. Read had other interests as well. For almost 14 years he was director of the Windhill Co-operative Society, and before that had taken an active interest the Liberal cause in Shipley. being auditor, and on the committee, of the West Ward Liberal Club He is now vice-chairman of Shipley Veterans' Association. In his younger days Mr. Read was very keen on walking and other healthy exercise, but for some years now has not enjoyed good health. He believes, however, in counting his blessings. "I had a good mother and good brother, and I have a good wife." he said, “and those three have more than made up for any disappointments.”

Mrs. Read was born at Queensbury but has lived at Saltaire since she was 12 years old. Like her husband, she worked at Saltaire Mills, but left on her marriage In order give her full attention to the home. Both she and her husband are great believers in full and happy home life.

David died 26 January 1951. In his will he left £3013 18s 3d., (worth c£97,000 in 2020) to Mary, his widow.

Mary died 2 March 1952.

 

Read, Mary Hannah (nee Barrow)
18 October 1875 – 2 March 1952

Mary Hannah Barrow was the daughter of Stocks Barrow. Stocks was born c1854 in Queensbury. He married Eliza Appleyard in 1874.

Mary, their eldest child, was born 1875 in Queensbury.

In 1881 they were living in Ayrshire, Scotland where Stocks was a spinning overlooker. In 1891 they were living at Thurstonland near Huddersfield. By 1898 they were living at 54 George Street in Saltaire with Stocks working as a lamplighter and Mary a mill hand in Saltaire Mills.

She married David Morris Read 12 October 1898 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Saltaire. Mary stopped working at Saltaire Mills after she was married. They had five children, including Harry and Frank, who both served in WW2. Their son George served in both WW1 and WW2.

David worked as a clerk then a matcher at Saltaire Mills and he lived with his family at 51 George Street in Saltaire; by 1918 they were living at 33 (renumbered 65) Albert Road

Report from the Shipley Times 13 October 1948: -

SALTAIRE GOLDEN WEDDING

Mr. & Mrs. D. M. Rend – “I wish every married couple were as happy my wife and I have been." said Mr. David Morris Read, of 65. Albert Road, Saltaire, when a "Times Express" reporter called to see him at the Shipley Veterans' Rooms, Crowghyll Park, the other day. about his and Mrs. Read’s golden wedding anniversary, which they celebrated yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. Read, who are both 73 years of age, were married at Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel on October 12. 1898. They have had four sons and one daughter and have seven grandchildren. Their eldest son. Squadron Leader George Read, was killed whilst serving with the R.A.F. in the recent war.

Mr. Read has lived in Saltaire since infancy. He attended the Albert Road Schools as a boy. and. at the age of ten, began work as a half-timer Saltaire Mills. Anxious to improve himself, he attended evening classes and won a scholarship to the Technical Institute. He was transferred to the Counting House at the mill, and ultimately became a top matcher, which position Mr. Read held at the time of his retirement, five years ago. after 58 years’ service with the firm. A gift of an easy chair marked the appreciation of the directors of the mill for his work after over 50 years at Saltaire Mills.

But Mr. Read had other interests as well. For almost 14 years he was director of the Windhill Co-operative Society, and before that had taken an active interest the Liberal cause in Shipley. being auditor, and on the committee, of the West Ward Liberal Club He is now vice-chairman of Shipley Veterans' Association. In his younger days Mr. Read was very keen on walking and other healthy exercise, but for some years now has not enjoyed good health. He believes, however, in counting his blessings. "I had a good mother and good brother, and I have a good wife." he said, “and those three have more than made up for any disappointments.”

Mrs. Read was born at Queensbury but has lived at Saltaire since she was 12 years old. Like her husband, she worked at Saltaire Mills, but left on her marriage In order give her full attention to the home. Both she and her husband are great believers in full and happy home life.

David died 26 January 1951. In his will he left £3013 18s 3d., (worth c£97,000 in 2020) to Mary, his widow.

Mary died 2 March 1952. In her will she left £8359 5s 7d (worth c£250,000 in 2020) to her married daughter Edna Jowett and her son Frank Read.

 

Redman, Ogden
1847 – 12 October 1890

Ogden Redman was the son of William Redman. William was born c1815 in Haworth. He married Nancy Bains in Haworth in 1844. They had at least six children.

Ogden was born 1847 in Haworth. The family lived in Haworth where William was a wool sorter. By 1871 Ogden was also working as a wool sorter.
Ogden married Sarah Cooper in 1872. They had at least four children.
Report from the Shipley Times Saturday 17 August 1878 as follows:

On Tuesday evening last, a special general meeting of the members of the Saltaire Industrial Society was held in the Lecture Theatre of the Club and Institute, for the purpose of rescinding a resolution passed at a former meeting to wind up the Society. There was a large number of the members present. A resolution rescinding the motion for winding up and substituting compounding with the members instead, was passed almost unanimously, only three voting against it.
Messrs Holdsworth, Stell, and Redman, with the assistance of a licensed valuer, were appointed compounders.
Messrs Simpson, Rushworth, Marshall, Boddy, Dodgson and Midgley, committee men; Mr A George, president; Messrs T. Light and M Holdsworth, secretaries; and Messrs J Stell and O. Redman, auditors. Mr A George presided.

In 1881 Ogden was living with his family at 16 Mary Street in Saltaire. By 1886 Ogden and his family had moved to Dalry, near Ayr in Scotland. In October 1886 Ogden is reported as speaking at a meeting of the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Society in Dalry. In October 1889 Brother O. Norman is reported as playing the harmonium at a meeting of the Garnock Lodge in Dalry.

Ogden died 12 October 1890 in Dalry. He left £149 in his will (worth c£20,000 in 2020).

 

Rhodes, Robert
16 May 1874 – 27 August 1945

Robert Rhodes was the son of John Rhodes. John was born c1838 in Baildon. He married Mary Whitaker 26 December 1861 St John’s Baildon. They had at least 10 children. In 1871 they were living at Baildon where John was a leather currier.

Robert was born 16 May 1874 in Baildon. By 1881 he was living with his family at 17 Constance Street in Saltaire.

Report from the Shipley Times 14 January 1888: -

Wilful Damage At Saltaire – Robert Rhodes, a youth about fourteen, a “doffer” employed at Saltaire Mills, and living at Constance Street, Saltaire, was summoned at the instance of John William Thornton, storekeeper at Sir Titus Salt, Bart, Sons & Co. Ltd.

Complainant said that on 2 January he saw the defendant deliberately, with a large hammer which he had in his hand, knock a large piece off the top stone of the wall near to the mills, at the canal bridge.

The damage done had cost 7s. to put into repair. There had been so much damage of this kind done of late, that the firm were determined to make an example.

Superintendent Symonds said he did not wish to prejudice the case against the defendant, but he must point out that the police had continued complaints about damage being done at Saltaire. The police had, time after time, put notices up cautioning people against these offences.

The father of the defendant appeared and stated that his son had not intentionally done the damage. He (the father) had offered Mr Barber to pay the damage.

The Bench ordered the defendant to pay 7s. damage and fined him 2s. 6d. and costs in addition.

Robert’s father, John, died in 1893 and his mother, Mary, died in 1899.

Report from the Shipley Times 9 September 1899: -

Hard Swearing By Somebody – Robert Rhodes, of 11 Albert Road, Saltaire, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly on Friday 25 August at Saltaire.

Constables Gillies, Lumb, and Darwin gave evidence to the effect that on the night in question defendant was drunk and using bad language and was spoken to about his conduct, and as he was abusive, two of the officers followed him down to his residence, when he opened the back door and deliberately set a dog at them. Ultimately defendant’s brother fetched him inside the house.

Inspector Barraclough stated that he saw defendant on Bingley Road before he reached the other officers, and witness then spoke to him about his conduct.

Defendant denied that he was drunk, and that he was spoken to by any of the officers until they came to the back door, when he asked them what they wanted.

Defendant called Mr Fred London, who lives at No. 12 Albert Road, who stated that about 11.30 on the night in question he heard a disturbance going on, and threw up the bathroom window to see what was the matter, when he saw one of the officers strike at defendant with a stick over the yard door.

This witness was cross-examined by Supt. Crawshaw, but maintained that he had said was quite true, despite the statement of the supt., that no policeman was allowed to carry a stick.

Fred Whitaker said defendant stood talking to him near Sir Titus Salt’s Hospital from 10.45 till 11.15 on the night in question and appeared to witness to be quite sober.

James Clegg, of Saltaire, stated that he met defendant at the Rosse corner about 9.30 and they walked on together to the Ring Of Bells, which witness entered, but defendant went forward down Kirkgate, saying he was going for a walk round by the market place.

The Bench inflicted a fine of 12s 6d.

Rhodes was then charged with allowing a dog to be at large without muzzle on the night in question. The evidence as to this charge was equally conflicting and the Chairman said that as there was some doubt as to who opened the yard door and let out the dog, whether one of the officers or the defendant, the case was dismissed.

In 1901, Robert was a window cleaner living at 11 Albert Road (renumbered 21) with six of his siblings.

Report from the Shipley Times 26 December 1902: -

YOUNG MAN AND TWO SHEEP SKINS – Robert Rhodes, labourer, of Saltaire, appeared in custody on a charge of stealing two sheep skins by finding and appropriating the same to his own use.

Albert Barker, fellmonger, of Esholt, said that on the 12th instant he purchased 473 sheep skins at Manchester and consigned them by the London and North-Western Railway Company to be delivered at his place at Esholt. but when they arrived there were two skins short. The two skins produced in court were part of the Manchester skins, and were worth 5/6.

By the Chairman: There was no particular mark by which he could distinguish the skins, but he said to his manager, Mr Pate, on Wednesday morning, that these two skins were Manchester skins, and that was before the witness knew there were any missing.

George Henry Hudson, driver for the railway company, said that Saturday week he loaded 473 skins on two drays at Bradford and conveyed them to Esholt. When going along Valley Road the tailboard of one of the drays came off and let about 45 skins fall on to the road, but they picked them all up. When they got to Esholt, however, they had only 471 skins.

Richard Tate, manager for Mr Barker, said that on the previous Tuesday the prisoner came to their works at Esholt and offered two skins for sale. Witness asked whose skins they were, and prisoner said he had brought them from Saltaire. Witness gave 5/6 for them, but knew they were not this country skins when he bought them.

Constable Beaton said that on Thursday morning last he received the two skins from the prosecutor. He asked prisoner how he got them, and he said he found them. In reply to the charge, prisoner said he had not sold any skins before.

This was the case for the prosecution.

Prisoner went into the witness box and having been sworn said that on Saturday week was going to St. James’s Market along with Charlie Ferguson, and when they got a bit past Manningham Slaughterhouse, they found the skins on the road. put them on the flat carl, and they went on the market; the skins were exposed all the time, but nobody owned them. He afterwards made inquiries a butcher named Sim Hill, and a man named Hodgson, drover, and said they very likely belonged Esholt, and told him about a quantity of skins having fallen from the railway company's dray. On the Tuesday after witness said he took the skins to Esholt.

On arriving there he opened them out without saying anything about selling them, he was offered 5/6 for them and accepted the money. The man never asked him where he had got the skins. He kept them till Tuesday to see if he could find an owner, and even after he had sold them if he had found an owner, he would have given him the money he had received for them. In answer to Supt. Crawshaw, witness said he did not report the finding of the skins to the police.

Tate was recalled and said that he did ask prisoner where got the skins from; that was a question he always put when he did not know the man.

Charles Ferguson, of Saltaire, corroborated the evidence of Rhodes as the finding of the skins, which were put in witness's stable, where they remained till the Tuesday, when Rhodes fetched them away.

The Chairman said that as this was the prisoner’s first offence for stealing, the Bench had decided, after very careful consideration, to give him a chance. He would be imprisoned till the rising of the Court, but he must remember that if he was brought there again that would be recorded against him. They knew that many people who found things appropriated them to their own without intention of stealing, but it was a very improper thing to do.

Report from the Shipley Times 14 August 1903: -

A case in which Robert Rhodes and Fred Dodgson, both of Saltaire, were charged with being drunk and disorderly occupied the bench for some time. The case was before the Court last week but was adjourned so that defendants might bring witnesses.

Constable Beaton stated that on Monday night of the 27th of last month, about 11.15, he was on duty in Otley Road, Shipley, near the Old House at Home, when he saw the defendants arm in arm drunk and creating a disturbance. He went up to them and asked them to go away and told them they would be reported. He had known the defendants for four years. There were a number of people about at the time.

Inspector Barraclough corroborated Beaton’s evidence, and said he had known both the defendants for a number of years.

Benjamin Wigglesworth, who was called by Rhodes, said that on the night in question, between 11.15 and 11.20, Rhodes came to him at the top of Albert Road, where he (witness) was on duty as a watchman. He would not say that he was drunk, but he had had something to drink. Rhodes had seen him since last Thursday and asked him to come as a witness, but he told him he did not think he could do any good.

Thomas John Gray said he was employed as barman at the Fox and Hounds Hotel. On the night of the 27th, between ten and half past, Rhodes came into the Fox and asked for a drink, but he refused to serve him and told him he had had enough. He had to turn him out of the house. Dodgson was not with him at that time.

Rhodes said he was perfectly sober, and that he never saw Dodgson at all during the feast. He was at the Rosse Hotel just before 11 and was at home by 11.

Dodgson then called a witness who said he was in defendant’s company on Monday night from about 10.30 till 11.20. They never went into a public house at all, but they had some green peas from a stall just outside the Old House at Home. No policeman ever came up to them, nor did they see one about. Both of them were perfectly sober.

Defendants, against both of whom previous convictions were recorded, were each fined 10s and costs, or ten days.

Robert married Maria Broadley, 2 March 1910, at Eastbrook Hall Wesleyan Chapel in Bradford. They had at least three children. In 1911 they were living in Allerton where Robert was an iron driller and Maria a weaver. By 1925 they were living at 12 Broad Terrace in Windhill, where Robert would live the rest of his life.

Report from the Shipley Times 11 December 1925: -

Receiving Order – At Bradford County Court on Tuesday, a receiving order was made against Robert Rhodes, of 12 Broad Terrace, Windhill, furniture broker, carrying on business at 60 Leeds Road, Windhill.

In the 1939 Register, Robert was working as a general labourer. He died 27 August 1945.

 

Rice, Wilfred
19 August 1876 – 1942

Wilfred Rice was the son of William Henry Rice. William was born c1846 in Bradford. He married Jane Giles in 1870 in Bradford. In 1871 they were living at 4 Herbert Street in Saltaire with William employed as a worsted weaver.

Wilfred, the third child of four, was born 19 August 1876 in Saltaire. In 1881 they were living at 123 George Street (renamed Union Street) in Shipley. In 1891 & 1901 they were living at 13 Helen Street in Saltaire with Wilfred working firstly as a worsted spinner then as a cloth dyers’ labourer.

Wilfred married Florence Emily Wilkinson 2 February 1909 at St John’s Baildon. In 1911 they were living with Emily’s parents at 15 Fern Bank Street, Green Lane in Baildon.

Working at Saltaire Mills Wilfred did not serve in WW1.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 17 May 1918 as follows: -

Sixty-eight cases from Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons and Co., Ltd., Saltaire, were disposed of last Friday night by the Shipley Tribunal. Coun. T. Hill, J.P., presiding.

Postponements to various dates were given to the following (including) Wilfred Rice,41, married, Grade 3, dyers’ clerk.

In 1939 Wilfred was a dyer living at 29 Glenaire Drive in Baildon. He played billiards for the Saltaire Institute.

Wilfred died in 1942; Florence died 12 June 1942 at 9 Bank View, Baildon Green.

 

Ridgeway, Frederick Victor Charles

Ridgeway, Frederick Victor Charles - WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Riley, Samuel
11 July 1895 – 19 April 1958

Samuel Riley was the son of Alfred Riley. Alfred was born c1865 in Saltaire. He married Emma Giles 12 August 1894. They had three children.

Samuel, their eldest child, was born 11 July 1895 in Saltaire. In 1901 & 1911 the family lived at 1 Higher School Street in Saltaire, moving to 77 Victoria Road before 1914. In August 1907, Samuel was reported as having been awarded a major scholarship by the West Riding Education Authority. Alfred was a house painter; Samuel spent all his working life at Saltaire Mills. As an employee at Saltaire Mills in June 1919 Samuel was award a First Aid Certificate.

Samuel married Mary Shrimpton 5 June 1924 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Saltaire Road, Shipley. Mary lived at 9 Grange Avenue, Shipley; this is where Mary and Samuel would live for the rest of their married life. They had a daughter, Sheila who was born and died in 1928; they had a son, Geoffrey, born 1 September 1930.

In February 1939 Samuel was reported as being a committee member of Salts (Saltaire) Cricket Club. In March 1942 Samuel was reported as being a Lance Corporal in the No. 5 Platoon (Saltaire Mills) of the Shipley Home Guard.

Report in the Shipley Times 1 September 1954: -

Careless Driving Case Dismissed

A summons against Samuel Riley, aged 58, maintenance clerk, of 9 Grange Avenue, Hirst Wood Grove, Shipley, for careless driving, was dismissed after the magistrates had adjourned and decided there was some doubt.

A female interpreter was used during the case.

Chief Supt. McDonald said the case arose from an accident at the junction of Sleningford Grove and Hirst Lane on Sunday, 13 June, when a motorcycle, ridden by Heinrich Rodal, a foreign worker, collided with the car driven by Riley. Rodal’s friend was following on another solo motorcycle.

Samuel died 19 April 1958.

Report from the Shipley Times 23 April: -

Former Treasurer of Salts C.C. Dies

Thee death took place on Saturday of Mr. Samuel Riley, aged 62, of 9 Grange Avenue. Hirst Wood. Shipley, after a long illness. All his working life Mr. Riley had been employed at Saltaire Mills, and latterly was a Clerk in the Maintenance Department. He had been a committee member of Salts Cricket Club for some 20 years and for many years was treasurer. He was a past president of the Old Salts Association, and a member of Baildon Liberal Association. He leaves a widow and one son.

Samuel was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley, alongside his parents. In his will he left £2008 13s (worth c£50,000 in 2020) to his widow.

 

Ruchtin, Wasily
22 July 1912 – 1977

Report from Shipley Times 11 November 1953 as follows:

An incident at Salts Mill, Saltaire, between two foreign workers had a sequel Bradford County Court on Tuesday. A Ukrainian, Alexander Kolosowkyj, of Picton Street, Bradford, alleging he was assaulted by workmate, Wasily Ruchtin, of Spring Gardens, Bradford, claimed £l00 damages from him, following injuries he had received. He was awarded £75 damages, plus £4 17s. 3d. for loss of wages.
 Judge Myles Archibald said it was a disgraceful and cowardly attack and dismissed the counter claim of Ruchtin for £l7 6s. for loss of wages following his dismissal from work.
Mr D S Forrestor-Paton, for Kolosowkyj, said the two men were in charge of three combing machines in the mill and they operated one and a half each. On July 24 one machine was under repair and the men should have operated one each but there was a disagreement and Ruchtin, it was alleged, hit Kolosowkyj on the face, knocking him to the ground, where he hit him with a can and kicked him.
As a result of his injuries Kolosowkyj was off work for a week and had since complained of headaches and had difficulty breathing through his nose. He was troubled with deafness for a week after the incident. Ruchtin was dismissed from his job.
Ruchtin. in evidence, claimed that Kolosowkyj used an offensive word and all he (Ruchtin) did was to push him. and he (Kolosowkyj) fell over. Ruchtin denied kicking or striking the other man.

 

Ryder, Dorothy nee Watson
24 July 1893 –????

Dorothy Watson was the daughter of John Watson. John was born in 1859 in Saltaire. He married Mary Jane Jackson 29 January 1876 at St Peter’s Leeds. They lived at 40 Dove Street Saltaire, with John working as a wool sorter.

Dorothy was born 24 July 1893. In 1911 she was working as a spinner.

She married Thomas Wilfred Ryder 24 October 1916. They had two children.

In 1918 they were living with Dorothy’s parents at 40 Dove Street.

Report from the Shipley Times 30 September 1921: -

The adjourned case in which Thos. W. Ryder, labourer, Bradford, was summoned by his wife, Dorothy Ryder, of Saltaire, for desertion, was heard at the Bradford West Riding Police Court on Thursday (29 September).

Mr. W. Dunn, solicitor, Shipley, appeared for complainant, and explained that his client had declined an offer by defendant to take her back on the ground that she had contracted a certain disease from him; The offer was made only recently after defendant had been away, from his wife over a year. The offer was not a bona-fide one but had been made for the purpose of defending the ease.

Mr. Dunn quoted the ruling in case where it was laid down that where matrimonial offence was committed there the right to take proceedings, and the party could not be deprived of that right. Even supposing that the offer of defendant were bona-fide one there were reason able grounds for declining it.

When the case was heard previously the Bench had deemed it desirable that medical evidence should forthcoming, and the advocate had left no stone unturned in order to obtain the evidence, but without success. The Ministry of Health had given guarantees that treatment for certain diseases should be confidential. The Chairman (Mr. J. Q. Mowat): We quite appreciate that difficulty.

Complainant, in evidence, stated that she was at 'present living with her parents in Saltaire. She was married on the 24 October 1916, and there had been two children of the marriage. Both were living. One was 4 ½ years of age, and the other 1 ½. Witness had been before the Court in March 1920, summoning her husband for desertion. The case was adjourned for two months, and she and her husband resumed co-habitation on 20 March 1920. They went to live at her mother’s home, and whilst there her husband was under-going treatment at the Bradford Royal Infirmary.

At the time witness did not understand her husband’s condition, but she had now found out that the evening and the time he attended for treatment was the time when certain cases were dealt with.

On 6 May 1920, she found it necessary to take medical-advice herself and consulted her own doctor. Her husband asked her to go with him to the Royal Infirmary, where he was receiving treatment but she declined. Ever since that time witness had been under treatment, and had been a month in hospital, from August to September last year.

Her husband left her on May 23 last year. He had never returned to her since then but had sent her the portion of pension payable to him in respect of the children’s maintenance. This portion of pension amounted to 5s. 3d., and he had allowed her weekly amounts varying from 6s. to £1 For some part of this time, a period ending in February 1921 he was in a sanatorium, and she was paid his pension of £2. He ceased to make any payments to her in June 1921.

Since her application to the Court he had resumed payment of the 5s. 3d. weekly. At the present time defendant was in receipt of a pension of 12s. per week, and was working for Messrs. Wm. Ackroyd and Sons, as a dyers’ labourer. Over a period of four weeks defendant average weekly wage had been £2 11s. 10d. Complainant was a weaver and was now working at Saltaire Mills.

Defendant elected to give evidence and made the allegation that when he resumed co-habitation with his wife last year she was already undergoing treatment.

Mr. Dunn: Have you heard your wife state in evidence that it was not until 6 May that she took medical advice? — l don’t think so.

The Chairman (Mr. J. G. Mowat) Why did not you ask your wife in the box?

Defendant: I did not hear her say it.

Defendant, in reply to the Chairman, stated that he was employed as a dyers’ labourer, but was at present on short time.

The Bench made a maintenance order amounting to 30s. week.

Dorothy continued living with her parents.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
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