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Image: The Illustrated London News
Mill Workers who lived in Saltaire
Researched by Colin Coates
 

Surnames beginning with:

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Wainman, Amy (nee Newton)
26 January 1916 – 2015

Amy Newton was the daughter of Percy (Nobby) Newton. Percy was born 15 January 1894 in Barnsley. He married Lily Ann Hyden in 1915 at Hemsworth, Wakefield. They had 10 children.

Amy, their eldest child, was born 26 January 1916 in Hemsworth. By 1930 she was living with her grandparents, Thomas & Betsy Hyden at 15 Ada St in Saltaire.

Amy married Eric Burniston Wainman in 1939 in Keighley district. They had at least four children: Alan born 1940; Irene born 1942, Dennis born 1946, Eric jnr., born 1947.

In the 1939 register Eric and Amy lived with Eric’s mother at 6 Queen St, Shipley. They both worked at Saltaire Mills where Eric was a warehouseman and Amy a spinner.

In 1942 Amy was living at 8 Queen St, whilst her husband served in WW2. By 1949 Amy & Eric were living at 10 West Royd Tce. From around 1958 they were living at 57 West Royd Rd.

Eric died in 1978. Amy died in 2015 aged 99.

 

Wainman, Arthur

Wainman, Arthur - Mill Worker / WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Wainman, Charles

Wainman, Charles - Mill Worker / WW2 Roll of Honour

Wainman, Elsie (nee McCue)
9 April 1905 – 1975

Elsie McCue was born 9 April 1905 in the district of Halifax. Her parents were Bridget Quinn & James McCue.

In 1911 they were living at Worth Village in Keighley. By 1914 they had moved to 7 Caroline Street in Saltaire, where they remained throughout the war.

James worked as an iron moulder, and he served in WW1.

Elsies’s mother, Bridget, died 1 st Qtr. 1921.

In the 1921 Census Elsie was a twister working in Saltaire Mills.

Living at 8 William Henry Street, Saltaire and working as a weaver, Elsie married Arthur Wainman, 27 July 1929, at St Peter’s Shipley. Arthur, born 26 December 1903, was a warehouseman living at 59 Albert Road, Saltaire. They had three children – Bernard in 1929, Margaret 1933, and James 1944.

In 1939 they were living at 3 Myrtle Place in Saltaire., where they would live the rest of their lives. Arthur served in WW2.

Elsie died in 1975. Arthur died 29 May 1977.

 

Wainman, Eric Burniston

Wainman, Eric Burniston - Mill Worker / WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Wainman, Smith
1869 – 02 May 1935

Smith Wainman was the son of Denby Wainman. Denby was born c1827 in Selby. He married Ann Smith 23 January in Selby.

Smith, the fifth of seven children, was born 1869 in Selby. He was baptised 19 September 1869. The family lived in Selby with Denby working as a bricklayer’s labourer. Denby died in 1875.

Smith married Grace Ann Clayton in 1900 in Selby. They had seven children. In 1901 & 1911 they were living in Selby with Smith working as a yarn bleacher. By 1919 they were living at 25 Amelia Street in Saltaire. In the 1921 Census, Smith was an out of work labourer, employed at Saltaire Mills. They moved to 59 Albert Road around 1929. Smith died 2 May 1935.

Report in Yorkshire Post 3 May 1935 as follows: -

While following his employment as a warehouseman at Saltaire Mills yesterday, Smith Wainman (65), of Queens Street Shipley, complained of heart pains. When Dr Viret arrived Wainman was dead. He had heart disease.

Four of Smith’s sons, Arthur, Charles, Denby and Eric, worked in Saltaire Mills and they all served in WW2.

Another two children, Dorothy & Walter also worked in Saltaire Mills

Smith’s wife, Grace, died in 1968.

 

Wainman, Walter
5 October 1905 – 1979

 Walter Wainman was the son of Smith Wainman. Smith was born 1869 in Selby. He married Grace Ann Clayton in 1900 in Selby. They had seven children. In 1901 & 1911 they were living in Selby with Smith working as a yarn bleacher.

Walter, the fourth of seven children, was born, 5 October 1905, in Selby.

By 1919 the family were living at 25 Amelia St in Saltaire. In 1921 Walter was an out of work doffer employed at Saltaire Mills. He married Elsie Maud Memmott in 1930. She was born, 18 December 1908, in Rawmarsh, Rotherham. They had five children.

Walter had four brothers, Arthur, Charles, Denby & Eric, who also worked in Saltaire Mills, and served in WW2. Another sibling, Dorothy also worked in Saltaire Mills.

From before 1939 to after 1860 they lived at 26 Walker Street, Baildon. In 1939 Walter was a wool warehouseman. Walter died in 1979, Elsie in 1997.

 

Waite, Jessie (nee Patterson)
23 March 1887 – 1966

Jessie Patterson was the daughter of William Henry Patterson. William was born 1863 in Leeds. He married Mary Tiffany, 23 February 1885, in Bradford Cathedral. William was a tailor living at 16 Victoria Road in Saltaire; Mary was a worsted reeler living at 20 Albert Terrace.

Jessie, their second child, was born 23 March 1887 in Saltaire. In 1891 the family were living at 16 Caroline Street. In 1901 they were at 1 Herbert Street, with Jessie working as a worsted spinner in Saltaire Mills.

Jessie married Arthur Gott, 10 April 1909, at St Paul’s Shipley. They had two children; William, born 10 April 1910, and Kathleen, born 3 May 1913. In 1911 they were living at 13 Herbert Street, with Arthur working as a reeling overlooker. By 1915 they were living at 4 Edward Street in Bingley. Arthur served in and survived WW1. He died in 1937.

In the 1939 Register, widow Jessie was a woollen drawer living at 4 Edward Street, Bingley. She married Mark Waite in 1953.

Jessie died in 1966.

 

Walker, Edmund

Walker, Edmund - Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Walker, Lilian
1 April 1905 –????

Lilian Walker was the daughter of Harry Walker. Harry was born 20 July 1867 in Shipley. He married Elizabeth Ann Webb in 1888. In 1891 and 1901 they lived at 5 Birr Street in Shipley with Harry working as a plumber and water inspector.

Lilian, the second youngest of 10 children, was born 1 April 1905 in Shipley. In 1911 they were living at 7 Crowgill Road. By 1930 they had moved to 8 Park Street. Lilian’s mother, Elizabeth, died 5 December 1930 and she was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery.

In 1939 Lilian working as a weaver was living with her father at 4 Myrtle Place in Saltaire.

Report from Shipley Times 13 November 1940 as follows:

WEAVER KILLED AT SALTAIRE
Elsie Dorothy Chambers, weaver, aged 39, of 4 Charteris Road. Lower Grange, Bradford, was fatally injured in accident in the weaving department at Saltaire Mills yesterday. Mrs. Chambers was seen by another weaver to walk out of her “alley” with shocking injuries to the side of her head. Dr Foster, of Shipley, was immediately summoned, but when he arrived Mrs. Chambers was dead. The weaver who saw her, Lilian Walker, was taken ill as a result of the shock and had to return home.

Lilian’s father, Harry, died 21 December 1948, and he was buried with his wife.

 

Walker, Winifred Agnes (nee Branigan)
14 March 1903 – 1987

Winifred Agnes Branigan was born, 14 March 1903, in Saltaire to John and Ann Branigan. In 1901 they were living in Bentham, with John working as stationary engine fireman. From c1905 to c1932 they were lived at 12 Katherine Street, Saltaire.

In the 1921 Census Winifred, living with her parents, was a spinner at Saltaire Mills. She married Charles Frederick Walker in 1931. Charles was born, 9 October 1903, in Bradford. They had two sons – Peter, born 15 August 1932, and Anthony in 1938.

In the 1939 Register they were living at 49 Park Road, Bradford, with Charles working as a railway carriage cleaner.

Winifred died in 1987. Charles died in 1989.

 

Wall, Gabriel

Wall, Gabriel [Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour]

 

Wall, Margaret
1881 – 1931

Margaret Wall was the daughter of Michael Wall. Michael was born c1849 in Ireland. In 1881 and 1891 he was living with his wife, Bridget, and children in Knottingley. Michael was a sail maker and he died in 1900.

Margaret, the third of nine children, was born in 1881 in Knottingley. In 1901, widowed Bridget was living with her family at 6 Katherine Street in Saltaire. Margaret worked as a twister. By 1911 they had moved to 11 George Street in Saltaire.

In the 1921 Census, Margaret was working at Saltaire Mills. Having never married, she died in 1931 at 11 George Street.

Margaret had three brothers, Gabriel, Francis Bernard and Alphonsus, who served in WW1.

 

Wallbank, Jesse
17 June 1852 – 9 June 1886
(note – surname also recorded as “Walbank”)

Jesse Wallbank was the son of Thomas Wallbank. Thomas was born c1805 in Bingley. He married widow Amelia Hodgson (nee Whatmuff), 2 July 1848, at Bradford Cathedral.

Jesse, who had an elder sister, was born 17 June 1852 in Bingley. He was baptised 18 July 1852 at All Saints Bingley. In 1861 they were living at 11 Albert Terrace in Saltaire with Thomas working as a woolcomber. Amelia died in 1867 and she was buried 28 April at All Saints churchyard in Bingley.

Report from Bradford Daily Telegraph 14 Oct 1868 as follows: -

A boy named Jesse Wallbank, aged 16, while assisting his father at a circular saw, in the Saltaire works, accidently had three of his fingers sawn off. He was sent to the Bradford Infirmary.

In 1871 Thomas and Jesse were boarding with the Hill family at 34 Caroline Street in Saltaire.

Jesse married Elizabeth Sorrell in 1873. They had seven children, with one dying in infancy.

Report from the Yorkshire Post 16 June 1876 as follows: -

At the Bradford West Biding Court yesterday, Jesse Wallbank, a mechanic, residing at Saltaire, was fined 10s, and costs 17s, for having on the 6th inst., travelled from Apperley Bridge to Shipley in a first-class carriage, when he had a ticket only for the third class. He was seen to leave the third-class carriage at Apperley and retire on the wrong side from a first-class carriage when the train reached Shipley.

In 1881 they were living at 9 Amelia Street with Jesse’s father.

Report from Shipley Times 29 September 1883 as follows:

Fire at Saltaire
An outbreak of fire occurred at Saltaire on Monday last but owing to the prompt measures which were taken it was extinguished before very much damage was done. It appears that about half-past two on Monday afternoon, a woman named Jane Hall, living in Amelia Street, observed some smoke issuing from the bedroom of the house No. 9, Amelia Street—which is occupied by Mr. Jessie Wallbank, woolsorter—and she immediately raised an alarm fire. A labouring man who was working close by at the time carried the alarm to the Fire Brigade Station at the Saltaire Mills, and the fire engine was quickly on the scene. The flames were confined to one room, everything in which was burnt, the floor being completely destroyed. The fire is believed to have originated through some children in the house playing with matches, which means it is supposed the bed must have caught fire.

Before November 1884 they had all moved to 9 Queens Road in Shipley. Jesse died 9 June 1886.

Report from Shipley Times 12 June 1886 as follows: -

SINGULAR OCCURRENCE AT SHIPLEY
At the Rosse Hotel, on Thursday afternoon, Mr Barstow, coroner, held an inquest relative to the deaths of Thomas and Jesse Wallbank, who died at their residence 9 Queens Road, on Tuesday and Wednesday respectively.
Mary Chester, wife of Wilson Chester, coal dealer, of 8 Queens Road, said that the two deceased persons resided next door to her. The elder one she believed to be Thomas Wallbank, who was supposed to be about 81 years of age and was formerly a machine wool-comber. The younger one she believed to be Thomas's son Jesse, aged 34 years, who followed the occupation of a woolsorter. Thomas Wallbank had been ill for some time, but it was about a fortnight since she saw him alive. About quarter past five on Wednesday morning Jesse's wife knocked of her (witness), and ongoing into the house she saw her laid by the side of her husband. Mrs. Wallbank exclaimed, "dear, Jesse's dead," and on looking Mrs Chester saw that that was so. Mrs Wallbank further said that he had only been dead a few minutes, and that she had endeavoured to give him some brandy, but he did not take it. She (witness) knew that Jesse Wallbank had been very ill for some months. He went to work on Monday morning, however, but came back, being unable to follow his occupation. She last saw him alive about 7-30 Tuesday night, but did not speak to him. Mrs Jesse Wallbank was confined on Sunday morning, and was still in bed.
Mary Ann Keeling, single woman, of 7 Queen's Road, said that she helped to lay out both the bodies of the deceased persons, but found no injuries or marks of violence; the body of Jesse was very thin. She also saw him alive for the last time about seven o'clock on the Tuesday and supplied him with brandy and water twice on that day; once in the afternoon, and again before she went to see Inspector Yarley, in the evening. He had constantly to go the closet and complained of a pain in his inside.
Mr D’Arcy B. Carter, M.C.S., of Shipley, said that about half-past five on Tuesday afternoon, he was called to see Thomas Wallbank, at 9 Queen’s Road. He found him laid on the bed upstairs and had apparently just expired. The old man was very emaciated, and his son informed him that his father had had a fall, but that was nothing unusual, for he suffered from dizziness —which was a consequence of old age—and often had them. During the Tuesday morning Thomas had not felt well, and about noon his son noticed that his breathing had become shallow and short. He (Jesse) gave his father some brandy, but the old man gradually sank, and died in his son’s presence. In his (Dr Carter’s) opinion the cause of death was old age and natural decay.
On Wednesday morning, about half-past five o’clock, he was fetched by Mr Chester to see the body of Jesse. It was warm, and he had only been dead about half-an-hour. During the winter the deceased (Jesse) applied for admission to the Hospital, but as he was in receipt of parish relief, and suffering from pulmonary consumption (phthisis), was not eligible. Deceased was in a precarious condition, and not likely to live long; but (witness) did not expect him to die so soon. Dr. Carter also added that there could be truth in the report that the deceased, Jesse, had been suffering from woolsorters’ disease. In both cases the jury returned verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, viz., that the deceaseds had died from natural causes.

Jesse’s widow, Elizabeth died in 1935 aged 80.

 

Wallbank, Thomas
c1805 – 08 June 1886
(note – surname also recorded as “Walbank”)

Thomas Wallbank born c1805 in Bingley was the son of Lambert Wallbank.

Thomas married widow Amelia Hodgson (nee Whatmuff) 2 July 1848 at Bradford Cathedral. They had a daughter, Emma, born 21 March 1850, and a son, Jesse, born 17 July 1852. In 1861 they were living at 11 Albert Terrace in Saltaire with Thomas working as a woolcomber.

Report from the Bradford Observer 25 May 1865: -

On Thursday (18 May), in the West Riding Magistrates’ Court, Bradford, a couple living at Saltaire, named Thomas and Amelia Walbank, appeared in order to obtain a settlement of their differences.
The husband is evidently a plain, simple-minded, honest hearted, and industrious man about 55 years of age, and the woman, who is a second wife, looks much more youthful, being spruce, sprightly, and gay, but on this occasion she exhibited a black eye, which she alleged had been given to her by her husband.
This charge the husband did not deny but explained that it had not been given in malice, but as a means of correction for her misconduct, she being in the habit of staying out at night, going with other men, and doing many other things of which he could not approve.
The bench, seeing the position they were in, suggested that they should live apart, and that the defendant should make a weekly allowance to his wife. This proposal was indignantly repudiated by the defendant on the ground that he had a comfortable home, and all that he required from his wife was that she should conduct herself properly.
Ultimately the case was dismissed, the defendant being told that whatever might be the conduct of his wife he would not be justified in striking her. Some wholesome advice was also administered to the wife.

Amelia died in 1867 and she was buried 28 April at All Saints churchyard in Bingley.

Report from Bradford Daily Telegraph 14 Oct 1868 as follows: -

A boy named Jesse Wallbank, aged 14, while assisting his father at a circular saw, in the Saltaire works, accidently had three of his fingers sawn off. He was sent to the Bradford Infirmary.

In 1871 Thomas and Jesse were boarding with the Hill family at 34 Caroline Street in Saltaire. By 1881 Thomas was living with Jesse and his family at 9 Amelia Street. Before June 1886 they had all moved to 9 Queens Road in Shipley. Thomas died 8 June 1886.

Report from Shipley Times 12 June 1886 as follows: -

SINGULAR OCCURRENCE AT SHIPLEY
At the Rosse Hotel, on Thursday afternoon, Mr Barstow, coroner, held an inquest relative to the deaths of Thomas and Jesse Wallbank, who died at their residence 9 Queens Road, on Tuesday and Wednesday respectively.
Mary Chester, wife of Wilson Chester, coal dealer, of 8 Queens Road, said that the two deceased persons resided next door to her. The elder one she believed to be Thomas Wallbank, who was supposed to be about 81 years of age and was formerly a machine wool-comber. The younger one she believed to be Thomas's son Jesse, aged 38 years, who followed the occupation of a woolsorter. Thomas Wallbank had been ill for some time, but it was about fortnight since she saw him alive. About quarter past five on Wednesday morning Jesse s wife knocked of her (witness), and ongoing into the house she saw her laid by the side of her husband. Mrs. Wallbank exclaimed, dear, Jesse's dead,” and on looking Mrs Chester saw that that was so. Mrs Wallbank farther said that he had only been dead a few minutes, and that she had endeavoured to give him some brandy, but he did not take it. She (witness) knew that Jesse Wallbank had been very ill for some months. He went to work on Monday morning, however, but came back, being unable to follow bis occupation. She last saw him alive about 7-30 Tuesday night, but did not speak to him. Mrs Jesse Wallbank was confined on Sunday morning, and was still in bed.
Mary Ann Keeling, single woman, of 7 Queen's Road, said that she helped to lay out both the bodies of the deceased persons, but found no injuries or marks of violence; the body of Jesse was very thin. She also saw him alive for the last time about seven o'clock on the Tuesday and supplied him with brandy and water twice on that day; once in the afternoon, and again before went to see Inspector Yarley, in the evening. He had constantly to go the closet and complained of a pain in his inside.
Mr D’Arcy B. Carter, M.C.S., of Shipley, said that about half-post five on Tuesday afternoon, he was called to see Thomas Wallbank, at 9 Queen’s Road. He found him laid on the bed upstairs and had apparently just expired. The old man was very emaciated, and his son informed him that his father had had a fall, but that was nothing unusual, for suffered from dizziness —which was a consequence of old age—and often had them. During the Tuesday morning Thomas had not felt well, and about noon his son noticed that his breathing had become shallow and short. He (Jesse) gave bis father some brandy, but the old man gradually sank, and died in his son’s presence. In bis (Dr Carter’s) opinion the cause of death was old age and natural decay.
On Wednesday morning, about half-past five o’clock, he was fetched by Mr Chester to see the body of Jesse. It was warm, and he had only been dead about half-an-hour. During the winter the deceased (Jesse) applied for admission to the Hospital, but as he was in receipt of parish relief, and suffering from pulmonary consumption (phthisis), was not eligible. Deceased was in precarious condition, and not likely to live long; but (witness) did not expect him to die so soon. Dr. Carter also added that there could be troth in the report that the deceased Jesse had been suffering from woolsorters’ disease. In both cases the jury returned verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, viz., that the deceaseds had died from natural causes.

 

Walmsley, John Willie (Bill)
28 February 1897 - September 1979

Read the PDF document, written by Geoff Marston, which contains images >

Bill's grandson, Geoff Marston writes: John Willie Walmsley (known as Bill) was born in Bingley 28 February 1897 to Louisa Walmsley, with father unknown. Louisa married James William Hird, 1 April 1899, at Holy Trinity Church, Bingley. In the 1901 census, Louisa, with her son, Bill, but without her husband, were living with her married sister, Charlotte Furniss, at Laisterdyke in Bradford. Louisa and James had four children before James died around 1909.

In the 1911 census Bill was a doffer living with his widowed mother and her four young children, living at 36 Regent St in Bingley.

On the outbreak of WW1 on 4th August 1914, Bill appears to have been a ‘Goods Worker’ (which appears to have been Railway connected.) On 10th December 1915, aged 18, Bill signed up with the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment and left for France in February 1916. He then became a machine gunner with the 62nd Battalion Machine Gun Corps for the rest of his service.

He took an active part in the Somme offensive and was severely wounded by shrapnel in his left calf and treated in the Military hospital at Le Treport (Picture right) and later at Stretford Hospital near Manchester. On recovery, he was in action at Arras, Messines, Lens and Passchandaele. Thereafter, was involved in the retreat and allied advance of 1918. Having suffered with ‘trench feet’, he was first treated at Napsbury, then at Highfield Military Hospital, Liverpool. He remain with the Corps until his demob in September 1919. His home residence at this time was at 19 Thomas Street in Shipley.

On 26th March 1921, aged (23), Bill married Christian McRae Horner (25) at Hallfield Chapel, Manningham Lane in Bradford. Both were then living at 29 Beanland Square in Bradford. Christian was known to everyone as “Teeny”.

By 1926, he had attained employment as a dyer at the Dying House at the Salts, resulting in them taking tenancy of 1, William Henry St, Saltaire. At this time, they had two daughters; Joan born in 1922 and Gladys in 1925. Sadly Joan died that December.

Bill’s employment appears to have gone splendidly until the early 1930’s, when the state of trade dictated times of being ‘layed off’. I recall him telling me he often did home shoe repairs to help to make ends meet. At one stage in 1934, he worked, (as references show), intermittently for a few months with Mortimer Peel and Co, Castle Dyeworks at Bradford. However, he was certainly back in the Dye House at Salts by October 1937 (as you see by the photo below. Bill is centre front.)

Sad one cannot fill in gaps, because events of the time (later considered irrelevant) were never mentioned. I can now however, pick up at the start of WW2, when back at Salts, he became a member of the renowned ‘Dad’s Army’ or known then as the Local Defence Volunteers. (‘Look Duck and Vanish’) Bradford Group. ‘C’ or Shipley Company, 3rd WR Volunteers, and eventually made Lance Corporal.

I believe it was about 1941, Bill actually sought a new job with Windhill Co-operative Society as a delivery coalman. Coal then was loaded from the old Railway Goods/Coal Yard, which stretched parallel to Otley Road near to its junction with Valley Road and sacks were manuarlly filled then stacked on the flatbed lorry for deliveries to shops and houses. Once finished and home, he had his daily clean up in a tin bath in the kitchen.

After the war, Bill had an allotment adjacent to Hirst Lane, opposite Glyn Thomas’s Mill. With their closure in the 1960’s he moved to the allotment area below the railway lines. In 1955, it was reported that he was elected to the committee of the Saltaire and District Allotments Holder’s Association.

From the later 1920’s he had also been a member of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows at Bingley and made District Master in 1936. Additionally he was a great Regimental Duke of Wellington man, who would never miss any of the meetings/reunions in the 1960’s.

By 1950, wanting to attain a cleaner outlook on life, (and still working for the Co-op) Bill got a job as warehouseman at their main office at Windhill, mainly organising the grocery supplies for both the shop delivery lorries and their travelling shops. Unless the weather was particularly bad, he always walked from home to work and back. From the age of 9, (until he retired) I used to meet him in the warehouse midday most Saturdays, on finishing work and walk back home with him for a ‘Sunday’ style lunch.

In 1962 Bill retired, but continued to work from the Saltaire Road shop to keep the area travelling shops stocked up for the next two or three years. After that the allotment became his major hobby.

From 1940, he was also a member of the Shipley and District Working Men’s’ Club in Saltaire Road, which at that time was in club terms, his local, visiting on Friday evenings and Sunday lunchtimes. There was no club or pub in the Saltaire bounds until the 1970s.

Bill lost his wife Teeny in 1974, which after 53 years of marriage and 48 years together at No 1, must really have been an ordeal to conquer. However, knowing he was always open to a bit of adventure, I managed to encourage him to visit my wife and I, whilst serving with the Military in Holland in 1975 and later in 1978, when residing in Aberdeen. Bill passed away within St Luke’s hospital September 1979.

As most people would say when relating to their grandparent, “They were the best.” Bill and Teeny were certainly no exception, both had their outstanding qualities that reflected so very much on my younger years. Looking back, (through circumstances of working parents) I was indeed honoured to have been able to spend so much time in their company. Bill of course was known throughout the area as a ‘topper’ of a man with a generous character and always prepared to render any assistance he was able to give. Bill and Teeny were indeed flames that will never be extinguished as long as our family exists.

Written by Bill's grandson, Geoff Marston.

Read the PDF document, written by Geoff Marston, which contains images >

 

Walton, Elizabeth nee Halliday
16 October 1902 – 1985

Elizabeth Halliday was the daughter of Frederick Halliday. Frederick was an illegitimate child born, 3 May 1876, in a workhouse in Clayton. Frederick married Sarah Jane Miller, 26 June 1897, at All Saints, Bingley. At the time Frederick was a warehouseman living at 13 Caroline Street in Saltaire.

Elizabeth, the third of six children, was born 16 October 1902 in Saltaire.

The family lived in several houses in Saltaire as follows: -

8 July 1899 – 24 Caroline Street (now 44 Mary Street)
24 August 1900 – 21 Herbert Street
6 November 1903 – 11 Whitlam Street
12 March 1908 – 23 Ada Street
20 April 1910 – 27 Jane Street

In the 1921 Census, Elizabeth was a burler & mender and her father a foreman warpdresser. They were both working at Saltaire Mills.

Elizabeth married James Walton, 2 June 1923, at St. Peter’s, Shipley. He was born 23 August 1903, and he was a stone mason living at 62 Albion Road, Idle. They had a son, James, born 22 June 1925.

In the 1939 Register they were living at 56 Albion Road, Bradford, with James working as a foreman bricklayer.

Elizabeth died in 1985, three years after her husband, who died in 1982.

 

Ward, Hugh Machell
28 April 1893 – 1979

Hugh Machell Ward was born, 28 April 1893, in Ravensthorpe, Dewsbury, to Thomas Ward, a solicitor, & Ann Machell. Hugh was baptised, 25 May 1893, at St Michael & All Angels, Thornhill.

In 1901 the family was living in Stretford, Lancashire. In 1911 they were in Huddersfield.

As a student at London University, Hugh served in WW1. He was a Private in the West Riding (Duke of Wellington’s) Regiment before he was promoted to Second Lieutenant with the 3 rd Battalion York & Lancaster Regiment.

Hugh married Dora Lillian Bentley in 1919. Dora was born, 30 December 1893, in Bradford. From 1919 to 1926 they lived at 13 Albert Road (renumbered 25) in Saltaire. In the 1921 Census, Hugh was a foreign order clerk working at Saltaire Mills. From 1927 to 1933 they lived at 10 Nab Wood Avenue, Shipley. From 1934 to after 1960 they were at 74 Nab Wood Crescent, Shipley.

From 1922 onwards Hugh was M.C. for a number of events related to Saltaire Mills. In September 1923, he performed secretarial duties for the Saltaire Mills Sports Association Tennis Section Presentation Flannel Dance; he was a playing member too. Hugh was a performer and secretary of the Saltaire Mills Dramatic Society. In March 1941 he was reported as being the new leader of the Shipley Youth Centre for Boys. In February 1952 he was elected a sidesman at St. Peter’s church, Shipley. In June 1960 he was appointed secretary of the St. Peter’s Church Men’s Fellowship.

Dora died in 1974. Hugh died, 12 June 1979, at Hall Croft, Church Street, Windhill. In his will he left £3,493.

 

Watmough, Dorothy (nee Llewellyn)
11 October 1917 – 7 February 1991

Dorothy Llewellyn was the daughter of James Llewellyn. James was born 26 March 1880 in Millom, Cumberland. He married Esther Steele 13 October 1901 at Holy Trinity church in Millom. James & Esther had seven children all born in Millom, who would all eventually work in Saltaire Mill.

John Charles (1902-1957) 3 Lapstone Road
Olive (1903-1970) 3 Lapstone Road
Frank (1905-1963) 20 Devonshire Road
James (1906-1984) 17 Lapstone Road
Amy (1907-1985) 17 Lapstone Road
Esther (1915-2001) 17 Lapstone Road
Dorothy (1917-1991) 17 Lapstone Road

In 1911 the family were living at 17 Lapstone Road in Millom, where James was an iron ore miner.

Dorothy, their youngest child, was born 11 October 1917 at 17 Lapstone Road. In 1919 Dorothy moved with her family to Saltaire. In 1919 she lived with her parents at 2 Edward Street, (originally 7 Bath Buildings). From 1920 they were at 26 George Street.

Dorothy attended the Saltaire Wesleyan Methodist Church. With her elder sister, Esther, Dorothy was a soloist in a Missionary Play produced by the members of the Shipley Methodist Churches in December 1933. Along with her siblings, Dorothy worked at Saltaire Mills and was a member of Saltaire Mills Gymnastic Club.

In March 1939 Dorothy competed in the Women’s Individual Gymnastic Championship held in Manchester. The competition was won by Mrs Clarice Bell of Saltaire with 190.3 points. Runner up was Mrs. Mary Hoddy of Saltaire with 182.1 points. Dorothy scored 159.5 points. Her best event was the “free exercise.”

Dorothy married Arthur Watmough, 23 September 1939, at Saltaire Methodist Church. Arthur was born 22 August 1914 to Willie Watmough & Ada Hall. He worked as a wool buyer & salesman. He had been working in New Zealand, where he was involved in exporting wool to the UK. During the war they lived at 47 Manor Lane in Shipley, where Arthur worked at Keighley Lifts. They had a son, Anthony (Tony) Llewellyn Watmough, born 11 August 1940.

With Arthur working for John Rhodes & Co, Bradford, (a company he would eventually own) he emigrated to New Zealand with his wife and son in 1950. They departed from Southampton aboard the M.V. Dominion Monarch bound for Wellington. They lived in Karori near Wellington, moving to Auckland when they retired. Whilst in New Zealand they had a daughter, Avis Jane Watmough, born 4 April 1955.

The family made several visits to the UK which doubled as business trips. They visited in 1952, 1956, c1961, 1975, c1980, with several more between 1961 and 1975; their visits were usually of 3 to 4 months duration. On one occasion Arthur visited Europe, including the communist bloc, on business.

Arthur died 6 July 1990 in Auckland. Dorothy died in Auckland 7 February 1991. Tony still lives near Wellington, whilst Avis lives in Auckland.

(Compiled with the help of John Rolfe-Dickinson, a grandson son of James & Esther.)

 

Watson, Reuben

Watson, Reuben - Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Webb, Albert

Webb, Albert - Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Webster, Doris Evelyn (nee Denison)
22 July 1898 – 20 November 1977

Doris Evelyn Denison was the daughter of Robert William Orlando Denison. Robert was born 22 May 1873 in Esholt. He married Harriet Naylor, 28 November 1896, at the Wesleyan Chapel in Charlestown, Baildon.

Doris, the eldest of three children was born 27 July 1898 in Baildon. In 1901 & 1911 the family were living at 36 Caroline Street in Saltaire. From 1914 to 1919 they were at 3 Harold Place, then from 1921 to 1926 at 3 Albert Road (renumbered 5).

Doris, a telephone operator at Saltaire Mills, married Gordon Henry Glover, 3 April 1926.

Report from the Shipley Times 9 April: -

GLOVER – DENISON
A pretty wedding took place at Rosse Street Baptist Church, Shipley, on Saturday, between Mr. Gordon Henry Glover, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Glover. 44 Kirkgate, and Miss Doris Evelyn Denison, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orlando Denison, 5 Albert Road, Saltaire.
The bride's father is manager of the spinning department Salts (Saltaire) Ltd., the bride has been employed as a telephone operator, and the bridegroom is manager of the firm’s canteen at the Royal Cafe, Saltaire.
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. J. S. Crole. Mr. J. A. Coates played selections on the organ.
The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a dress of silver-grey crepe-de-chine, with side panels of georgette, piped with blue crepe-de-chine She wore a georgette hat and veil, and carried a bouquet of blush roses. She was attended by two bridesmaids. Miss Mary Winifred Denison (her sister) and Miss Edith Glover (sister of the bridegroom). Miss Denison wore a two-piece beige suit, with a gold tissue hat. Miss Glover was attired, in a two-piece Wedgwood blue suit, with hat to match. They each carried a bouquet of pink carnations. Mr. Richard Brown, of Windhill, acted as best man. Mr. John Redvers Denison (brother of the bride), and Mr. G. Peel were groomsmen.
After the ceremony a reception was at the West Ward Liberal Club, Saltaire, where the bride and bridegroom received the hearty felicitations of their relatives and friends.
Subsequently Mr and Mrs G H Glover left for London. They were the recipients of several beautiful wedding presents, among those to the bride, a handsome dining room clock from her colleagues at Saltaire Mills.

By 1931 the married couple were living apart, Doris was living with her parents at 7 Ivy Grove in Shipley. In the 1939 Register, Doris remained with her parents whilst Gordon was an advertising agent living in Morecambe.Having divorced Gordon, Doris married Clarence Victor Webster in 1951. Clarence was born 3 August 1904. When her uncle, Gordon Harold Denison, died in 1954, he left her £747 5s 3d (worth c£21,000 in 2020) in his will. Her husband, Clarence died, 1st Qtr. 1977; Doris died 20 November 1977, at 558 Leeds Road, Thackley, Bradford. In her will she left £10,166 (worth c£65,000 in 2020).

 

Wensworth, Bernard
12 March 1905 – 2 February 1976

Bernard was the son of Benjamin Wiseman Wensworth. Benjamin was born, 8 October 1874, in Clifford near Wetherby. He married Mary Ann Wall, 1 st Qtr 1901. They had nine children. In 1901 they were living in Knottingley with Benjamin working as a cooper. By 1904 they had moved to 9 Caroline Street in Saltaire. From 1905 they lived at 14 Whitlam Street.

Bernard, their third child, was born, 12 March 1905, in Saltaire. In 1911 his father was working as a tram conductor. By 1914 they were living at 19 Jane Street in Saltaire. In the 1921 Census, Bernard was a messenger working at Saltaire Mills.

From 1924 Bernard played cricket for Saltaire Mills in the Bradford Central League. In December 1924 he was reported as being secretary of the football section of the Saltaire Mills Sports Association. He was still performing this role in 1952.

In 1934 Bernard married Margaret O’Donnell. In the 1939 Register they were living at 13 Glenholm, Shipley where he was a weaving and designing clerk. In 1947 they moved to 10 Moor View Avenue, Shipley. They had two daughters – Margaret born in 1940, and Carol in 1947. Sadly, Carol died the same year as she was born.

During WW2, Bernard was the “skipper” of the fire watching team at Saltaire Mills. In January 1947, Bernard was chairman of a committee that organised a successful dance for the Shipley Catholics’ at the “Lakean” Dance Hall, Friendly Societies’ Hall, Shipley.

Bernard died, 2 February 1976, at 10 Moor View Avenue. In his will he left £8,382.

 

Wensworth, Vincent Michael
1 August 1903 – 10 June 1966

Vincent Michael Wensworth was the son of Benjamin Wiseman Wensworth. Benjamin was born, 8 October 1874, in Clifford near Wetherby. He married Mary Ann Wall 1 st Qtr 1901. They had nine children. In 1901 they were living in Knottingley with Benjamin working as a cooper. By 1904 they had moved to 9 Caroline Street in Saltaire. From 1905 they lived at 14 Whitlam Street.

Vincent, their second child, was born, 1 August 1903, in Saltaire. In 1911 his father was working as a tram conductor. By 1914 they were living at 19 Jane Street in Saltaire.

In the 1921 Census, Bernard was an apprentice overlooker working at Saltaire Mills. In November 1923, Vincent was M.C. at a dance in the Victoria Hall, Saltaire, promoted by the Saltaire Mills Spinning Department. He was M.C. at numerous functions in Shipley & Saltaire.

In March 1934, Vincent was secretary for St. Walburga’s Roman Catholic Church’s parochial tea and concert. He was also secretary of the Shipley Men’s Catholic Club. In the 1939 Register, he was a spinning overlooker living with his mother and siblings at 41 Leyburn Grove, Shipley.

Living at 10 Victor Road, Manningham, Victor died at St. Lukes Hospital, Bradford, 10 June 1966.

 

West, Edith (nee Excell)
23 August 1901 – 20 March 1978

Edith Excell was the daughter of Joseph Excell. Joseph was born 1863 in Saltaire. He married Emily Graham, 1 July 1883, at Bradford Cathedral. They were both living at 24 (renumbered 47) Road in Saltaire. They had eight surviving children. In 1891 they were living at 4 Helen Street, with Joseph working as a plate layer.

Edith, their seventh child, was born, 23 August 1901, in Saltaire. In 1901 the family was living at 11 Whitlam Street, Saltaire, with Joseph working as a cloth presser. By 1911 they had moved to 22 (renumbered 43) Albert Road.

In January 1916 Edith received a prize as a scholar at Saltaire Congregational Sunday School. In the 1921 she was living with her family at 33 Titus Street, Saltaire. She was a weaver at Saltaire Mills.

Edith married Frank Edwin West in 1929. Frank was born, 18 September 1900, in Huddersfield. They lived at 43 Helen Street, Saltaire, until their deaths.

In the 1939 Register, Frank was a window cleaner and a volunteer with the Shipley Auxiliary Fire Service.

Frank died in 1968. Edith died, 20 July 1978.

 

Weston, Cyril

Weston, Cyril - Mill Worker / WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Weston, Hilda (nee Gott)
26 February 1904 – 1978

Hilda Gott was born, 26 October 1904, in Shipley to Willie Gott & Margaret Ann Abbott. By 1911 they were living at 26 Jane Street in Saltaire, with Willie working as a wool sorter.

In 1921 Hilda was a burler & mender at Saltaire Mills.

Hilda married Harold Weston, a railway fireman (born 21 December 1903), of 35 Rhodes Street, Shipley, 2 June 1823, at St. Paul’s, Shipley. They had at least three children.

In 1939 they were living at 1 Baker Street, Shipley, with Harold working as a L.M.S. locomotive fireman. They lived here until after 1960.

Their daughter, Sheila, born, 30 August 1934, died 29 June 1941, aged just seven. Hilda died in 1978. Harold died, 8 September 1979, at 1 Harbeck Drive, Harden, Bingley.

 

West, Fielding Reginald

West, Fielding Reginald - Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Whalley, Charles Smith

Whalley, Charles Smith - Mill Worker / WW1 Roll of Honour

 

Wheeler, Annie (nee Alderson)
26 April 1903 – 1984

Annie Alderson was born, 26 April 1903, in Barnsley. She was the third child of Lucy Oates and Herbert Alderson. Annie was baptised, 23 August 1903, at St. John the Baptist, Barnsley.

In 1911 Herbert was a coal miner living with his family in Barnsley. Around 1920 they moved to 13 Constance Street in Saltaire.

In the 1921 Census Annie was a spinner working at Saltaire Mills, her father was a gateman for Scotts Motor Cycle Co., in Hirst Wood, Shipley. In September 1922 Annie was one of a number of singers who performed at the fifth anniversary of the Saltaire National Spiritualist Church, held in the Victoria Hall.

Annie married Charles Wheeler, 31 December 1926, at St. Paul’s, Shipley. He was born, 4 December 1906, in Hunslet. They had two children. By 1930 they were living at 30 Mary Street, Saltaire. They moved to 2 West Royd Mount, Shipley, around 1939. In the 1939 Register, Annie worked as a gill box minder, and Charles as a wool comber.

Annie died in 1984 in the Bradford district. Charles died in 1987.

 

White, Frederick
3 March 1864 – 5 September 1940

Frederick White was born, 3 March 1864, in Huddersfield. He married Emily Lees, 11 February 1888, at All Saints, Paddock, Huddersfield. She was born in 1863 in Huddersfield. They had no children.

In 1891 they were living in Halifax, where Frederick was a foreman of weavers & menders. In 1901 & 1911 they were living at 13 Maddocks Street, Shipley, with Frederick working as a foreman mender.

They lived at 5 (renumbered 9) Albert Terrace, Saltaire, from 1920 to 1923. By 1927 they were living at 26 Grosvenor Road, where they would spend the rest of their lives. Frederick played cricket for Saltaire and billiards for the Saltaire Institute. In the 1925 local elections, as a Conservative, Frederick was re-elected as a councillor in Shipley’s West Ward.

Frederick died 5 September 1940.

Report in the Shipley Times 11 September: -

The death has occurred in his seventy seventh year, of Mr. Frederick White, of 26, Grosvenor Road, Shipley, a member the Shipley Council from 1923 to 1931, and formerly manager of the burling and mending department at Saltaire Mills for many years. In his younger days Mr. White was an enthusiastic amateur cricketer and rendered excellent service as a bowler with the Saltaire and Windfall teams. He played for the Yorkshire Colts several times. During his membership of the Council he did good work as chairman of the Estates Committee and the Libraries Committee.

In his will Frederick left £4.204 3s 5d. He was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley. His widow, Emily, joined him when she died 29 March 1946. In her will she left £934 13s 3d.

 

Whitfield, William Henry
14 November 1869 – 16 August 1893
 

William Henry Whitfield was the son of Thomas Whitfield. Thomas was born c1844 in Shipley. He married Jemima Stephenson, 6 March 1869, at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

William, the eldest of four children, was born, 14 November 1869, in Shipley. In 1871 they were living at 26 Lane Bottom in Idle with Thomas working as a cordwainer. In 1881 they were living at 19 Thompson Street in Shipley with William working as a worsted spinner. In 1891 William was a wool sorter living with his parents at 7 Caroline Street in Saltaire.

William died, 16 August 1893.

Report from Shipley Times Saturday 26 August 1893 as follows: -

Death of a Promising Musician

On Friday last the funeral of the late Mr W. H. Whitfield, took place at the Charlestown Cemetery in the presence of a large number of musical people.

Mr Whitfield was only 23 years of age, but he had won for himself a creditable position as a violin player. He did this, though ordinarily employed as a woolsorter at Saltaire Mills. The deceased possessed undoubted musical talent. He was one of the orchestra of the Shipley Choral Society, a member of the Shipley Orchestral Band, and leader of C. Meddiford's string band.

At Shipley Feast he went for a holiday in Morecambe, and it is thought that a wetting which he received there was the origin of his illness, which terminated fatally on the 16th inst. Much sympathy is felt for his parents, who feel his loss very deeply. At the funeral there were many of the deceased’s fellow workmen and musical friends, amongst them being Mr I. Shepherd, Mr Crossley, Mr Green, and Mr C. Meddiford. Mr F. Bolton, of Shipley, conducted the burial service.

 

Whiting, William Lester
26 August 1868 – 17 February 1957

William Lester Whiting was born, 26 August 1868, in Norwich to William Samuel Whiting & Harriet Lester Waller. He was baptised, 5 July 1874, at St. Augustine’s, Norwich. In the 1871 Census they were living in Norwich, with William snr. working as a fish dealer.

Around 1877 William started work at Saltaire Mills as a part time doffer. William’s mother died in 1879. By 1881 William had moved to Huddersfield with his father and brother. He would live here the rest of his life.

In 1881 he was a cloth cutter, by 1891 he was a postman. William married Ada Parr, 14 October 1891, at St. John’s, Huddersfield. She was born, 14 July 1870, in Huddersfield. They had no children. By 1939 he had retired.

Report in the Bradford Observer 15 October 1941: -

Mr. William Lester Whiting, 65 Clement Street, Birkby, Huddersfield, who (with Mrs Whiting) yesterday (14 October) celebrated his golden wedding.

He came North from Norwich at an early age, and when only eight, began work as a doffer at Salts (Saltaire) Miils at a wage of half-a-crown a week, parr time.

He is 73, a retired postman with 40 years’ postal service. He still walks an average of six miles a day.

Ada died in 1942. William died, 17 February 1957 in Huddersfield. In his will he left £1,231 17s 6d.

 

Wigglesworth, Arthur
29 October 1881 – 5 November 1918

Arthur Wigglesworth was the son of James Wigglesworth. James was born c1857 in Menston. He married Eliza Ann Wilcock 14 May 1881 at Bradford Cathedral.

Arthur, the eldest of three children, was born 29 October 1881. He was baptised 24 January 1882 at St Luke’s Manningham. In 1891 the family were living at 20 Mary Street in Saltaire with James working as a plush overlooker.

Arthur, living at 38 Dove Street, was a millhand at Saltaire Mills in July 1897 when he gave evidence at an inquiry into the death of his friend, Albert Scholefield.

Arthur married Edith (surname unclear) in c1909. In 1911 they were living at 11 Edward Street (renumbered 16) in Saltaire with Arthur employed as a warp twister. By 1918 they had moved to 8 Mawson Street.

Arthur died 5 November 1918.

 

Wilson, Elizabeth (nee Mangan)
1885 –????

Elizabeth Mangan was born in 1885 in Liverpool to John Mangan & Maria Mooney.

In 1901 she was a twister living with her Aunt, Christine Byrne, at 47 Titus Street, Saltaire. By 1911 they had moved to 11 Mary Street.

By 1918 Elizabeth was living at 1 Fanny Street. In 1921 she was living alone and working as a twister at Saltaire Mills.

Elizabeth married William Wilson in 1925. It is unclear what happened to them after this.

 

Winterburn, Sarah Ellen (nee Park)
8 December 1906 – 1971

Leavens Park was born 8 December 1906 in Harrogate to Robert Park and Margaret Wood. In 1911 they were living in Harrogate with Robert working as a farm labourer. By 1916 they had moved to 74 George Street in Saltaire.

In 1921 Sarah was a spinner at Saltaire Mills. Sarah married James Winterburn in 1925.

Report in the Shipley Times 24 February 1943: -

BAILDON WIFE’S SUMMONS

At a domestic court at Otley, on Friday 19 February, Sarah Winterburn, East Parade, Baildon, summoned her husband, James Winterburn, of Bingley, for desertion.

An order was made in favour of the wife for the payment of 12s. 6d. a week.

In 1956 Sarah was living with her married sister, Edith Tennant, and her husband, at 10 Fanny Street, Saltaire. Sarah died in 1971.

 

Womersley, Charles
25 October 1818 – 14 November 1880

Charles Womersley was born, 25 October 1818, in Bradford. He married Elizabeth Tankard, 22 April 1850, at St Peter’s in Leeds. She was born in 1827 in Bradford. They had at least seven children.

In 1851 they were living in Horton, Bradford with Charles working as an overlooker.

Charles worked at Saltaire Mills. According to a report in the Leeds Mercury published in June 1923, “he started the first loom when Saltaire Mills were opened.”

In 1861, Charles was living with his family at 48 (renumbered 74) George Street, Saltaire.

In 1871 he was a weaving manager, living with his family at 1 Fern Place, Saltaire.

Charles died, 14 November 1880, at 65 Horton Lane, Bradford. He was buried in Undercliffe Cemetery, Bradford. His widow joined him when she died, 12 March 1894.

Their daughter, Ann Elizabeth, married William Wade in 1880. He was knighted and was Lord Mayor of Bradford 1919/20.

 

Wood, Frederick
1841 – 6 November 1927

Frederick was born 1841 in Halifax. In 1861 he was a clerk at Saltaire Mills and living as a boarder at 47 George Street (renumbered 73) in Saltaire. Frederick married Anne Potter in 1867. They had five children:
Frederick jnr. (1870 – 1951)
Edith Bertha (1874 – 1876)
Eleanor (1877 – 1961)
Elizabeth, died in infancy
Anne, died in infancy

In the 1871, 1881 & 1891 censuses the family were living at 1 Albert Road in Saltaire with Frederick working as a cashier. They had a servant/housekeeper living with them.

In August 1871 Frederick is reported as being the treasurer of the fund that paid for a portrait of Sir Titus Salt that is in Victoria Hall (Saltaire Institute.)

In 1880, 1881 & 1883 Frederick was the auditor for the accounts of “The Salt Schools”. In April 1887 & February 1889 he was reported as being re-elected as the auditor for the Shipley Liberal Club Buildings Company. In November 1887 Frederick was one of the coffin bearers at the funeral of Titus Salt jnr.

Anne, Frederick’s wife, died 2 December 1889 aged 51. She was buried in the lower churchyard at St Paul’s Shipley with her three daughters. Frederick lived at 1 Albert Road until 1899.

In 1901 Frederick was an accountant working for himself and living with his two surviving adult children at 48 Moorhead Villas in Shipley. In July 1901 he was a signatory on an illuminated address presented to William Secker, the Saltaire railway stationmaster on his retirement. In February 1907 he was reported as being re-appointed auditor for the St George’s Hall Company. In 1911 Frederick was living with his two adult children at 37 Granville Road in Frizinghall.

Frederick died 5 November 1927.

Report from the Shipley Times 12 November: -

DEATH OF MR. FREDERICK WOOD

The death took place at his residence, Woodlands, Shipley Fields Road, Frizinghall, on Sunday, of Mr. Frederick Wood, who at the age of 86 was one the oldest men in the district.

Mr. Wood came to this district straight from the Lane School. Lightcliffe, on the invitation the late Sir Titus Salt, when the Saltaire Mills were opened, and remained with the firm in the position of cashier until the change of partnership in 1893. Since then ho had been in private practice accountancy and insurance.

He was one of the original members the Frizinghall Conservative Club and had for many years taken a deep interest in the work of Frizinghall Parish Church. A scholarly man, Mr. Wood was more at home the world of books than in public life, but took a keen interest in current events, whether politics or literature, and exerted wide influence in a quite unostentatious way. Geography, the natural sciences and particularly natural history were a continual source of interest and satisfaction to him. At one time he was a member of the Bradford Chess Club and of the Bradford Antiquarian Society.

The funeral took place at Shipley Parish churchyard on Wednesday, preceded by a service in Shipley Parish Church conducted by the Rev. J. 11. Warner (Vicar of Frizinghall), who also officiated at the graveside. The chief mourners were Mr. F. Wood (son). Miss E. Wood (daughter). Miss Gee, Miss Amos. Mrs. Ickringill, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Firth, Mr. R. S. Firth, Miss Firth, A. E. Carthew, Mr. and Mrs. Morton Smith, Miss Oates, Miss Howard. Mrs. Gath, Mrs. Bentley.

The Frizinghall Conservative Club was represented Messrs. F. S. Simpson (secretary), G. Herbert Blackburn, J. W. Drake. A. E. Rogerson. and H. B, Brook.

Among those present were Mr. J. H. Wright and Miss Wright (Bingley). Mr. James Firth. Mr. T. G. Walker (Bingley), Dr. Kabagliati (Bradford), Mr. Thomas E. Power, and Mr. W. E. Firth (Harrogate).

Shipley St Paul's Lower Churchyard Monumental Inscriptions

In loving memory of ANNE the devoted wife of FREDERICK WOOD of Saltaire who entered into rest December 2 nd, 1889 in the 51st year of her age,

Also of the above-named FREDERICK WOOD who entered into rest November 6 th, 1927 in the 87th year of his age

`Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God`

In loving memory of FREDERICK son of FREDERICK and ANNE WOOD who entered into rest December 16 th, 1951 in his 82nd year

Also of ELEANOR daughter of FREDERICK and ANNE WOOD who entered into rest July 19 th, 1961 in her 85th year.

In loving memory of EDITH BERTHA third daughter of FREDERICK and ANNE WOOD born December 9 th, 1874 died October 18 th, 1876 also

ELIZABETH and ANNE who died in their infancy.

 

Wood, Harold

Wood, Harold - Mill Worker / WW2 Roll of Honour

 

Wood, Ruth
15 August 1878 – 1972

Ruth Wood was the daughter of Alfred Wood. Alfred was born c1845 in Suffolk. He married Fanny (date of marriage and maiden name unknown). In 1871 they were living at 8 Albert Street in Shipley with Alfred working as a labourer.

Ruth, the youngest of six children, was born, 15 August 1878, in Shipley. She was baptised, 30 November 1879, at St Paul’s Shipley. In 1881 the family were living at 29 Dover Street in Shipley. From 1891 they were at 11 Jane Street in Saltaire.

In 1921 Ruth was working as a drawer at Saltaire Mills. She was boarding with the Wilson family at 7 Field Street, Shipley. In the 1939 Register she was a drawer living with the Hustler family at 114 Birklands Road, Shipley.

The Shipley Times (12 March 1941) reported that Ruth had completed 50 years’ service at Saltaire Mills, and she had been presented with gifts and a framed certificate.

Ruth, who never married, died in 1972 in Bradford district.

 

Woodcock, Violet Beatrice (nee Boyes)
13 December 1899 – 1980

Violet Beatrice Boyes was the daughter of John Boyes. John was born c1857 in Old Malton, North Yorkshire. John married Maria Cooper, 8 June 1878, at Norton, near Malton. Maria was born, 22 April 1860, at Terrington, North Yorkshire. They had nine children. In 1881 they were living at Ryton, near Malton, with John working as a farm labourer. In 1891 & 1901 they lived in Pickering.

Violet was born, 13 December 1899, in Pickering. In 1911 they were living at 6 Katherine Street, Saltaire, with John working as a hoist man in a mill. In 1921 they were living at 53 George Street, Saltaire, with Violet working as a weaver at Saltaire Mills.

Violet married Carl Beaumont, a motor mechanic living at 34 Whitlam Street, Saltaire, 31 March 1923, at St Peter’s, Shipley. Carl was born, 26 October 1900, in Liverpool. He served as a fitter in the Royal Navy in WW1. He enlisted, 5 March 1918, and was discharged 2 August 1922.

Violet & Carl had four children. From before 1931 to after 1960 they lived at 17 Hirst Wood Road, Shipley. In 1939 Carl was working as a capstan & lathe hand. Violet died in 1980, Carl in 1982.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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