Saltaire Village, World Heritage Site
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Colin Coates, historian
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Mill Workers' Biographies, M

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Mansfield, Alfred
c1839 – 11 September 1915

Alfred Mansfield was born c1839 in Bradford. His mother was Alice Mansfield and his father is unknown. In 1863 he married Nancy Neale. They had six children (all born in Saltaire): -
Amelia – born 1864 died 4 May 1882 
Zillah – born 1868
John William – born 1873
Albert – died 13 May 1876 just six days old
Phoebe – born 1878 died 1926
Ada – born 1881.

In 1871 the family were living at 19 Amelia Street in Saltaire with Alfred working as a worsted spinning overlooker. By 1881 they had moved to 4 Lockwood Street where they remained the rest of their lives.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 30 September 1893 as follows:

The drawing and spinning overlookers, to the number of twenty-three, employed at Saltaire Mills, sat down to an excellent supper on Wednesday evening last at the Victoria Hotel, Saltaire Road, Mr Alfred Mansfield presiding.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 26 December 1913 as follows:

Saturday was the golden wedding day of and Mrs. Alfred Mansfield, who have resided at their present address of 4 Lockwood Street, Saltaire, for forty-one years. Not the least interesting feature of the happy event is that the veteran couple are in the enjoyment or good health. They live themselves, their three daughters and one son being all married. Mr. Mansfield attained to his 74th birthday lost August, whilst his wife was 73 in June.
Their wedding day was on Sunday 20th December 1863, and the ceremony was performed by the Rev, Robert Smith at the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Manchester Road, Bradford.
Mr. Mansfield worked for the Saltaire firm in Bradford and at Saltaire for a period of about forty years, retiring in 1901, when he held the position of overlooker. As a token of their respect and good wishes employees of the spinning department presented him with a timepiece.
A native of Bradford, he started his industrial career at the early age of nine as a half-timer at Britannia Mills, Portland Street, Bradford. In accordance with the custom of those days Mr. Mansfield worked without wages for his first month as a half-timer, and afterwards he received 1s. 3d. a week. Nowadays half-timers in spinning rooms obtain an average of 3s. 9d. a week.
When Mr Mansfield was a boy there was seething discontent. Amongst the working classes of Bradford, the Chartist agitation was at its height and there were frequent, strikes. Mr. Mansfield recalls one occasion when the military were called out to disperse a meeting of strikers at the top of Bower Street. Amongst the poorer classes bread was a luxury—flour being 5s. per stone, and porridge was the staple food.
When about sixteen years of age Mr. Mansfield was apprenticed to the trade as a whitesmith, and in that capacity, he assisted to put up the railings in front of the Congregational Church at Saltaire. Afterwards he worked the railway. first as an engine cleaner and afterwards in the goods department, earning 16s. week, there being no extras for overtime, which sometimes lasted until midnight.
Whilst still a young man he quit the railway to take with the Saltaire firm, with whom remained for the long period already stated.
Mr. Mansfield has a record of useful service in the friendly society movement. He has been a member of the “Dyers Glory” Lodge (Bradford) National Independent Order of Oddfellows for fifty-four years. He went through all the lodge offices, and some idea of the high regard in which he was held by the brethren may be gathered from the fact that for twenty-six years he had the honour presiding at the anniversary celebration. In 1891 he was elected to the post of Grand Master of the Bradford District, and in recognition of his services in that capacity he was presented with a silver cruet.
He now takes an interest in the Rosse Street Brotherhood Veterans’ Association. Shipley, discharging the secretarial duties in connection with that body which has done a good deal to assist needy veterans.

Alfred died 11 September 1915 and he was buried in St Paul’s churchyard 15 September 1915. His widow, Nancy, was buried alongside him on 1 December in the same year.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 17 September 1915 as follows:

The funeral took place at the Parish Church Wednesday afternoon Mr. Alfred Mansfield, of 4 Lockwood Street, Saltaire, who died on Saturday, aged seventy-six.
Mr. Mansfield was secretary of the Veterans’ Association the members of which meet at the rooms in the Rosse Street Brotherhood. As a token respect the flag was hoisted at half-mast.
Before the interment a service was held at the Rosse Street Baptist Church conducted the Rev. H. W. Burdett and Mr. Wm. Hulme. In the course of a short address Mr. Burdett said that the deceased gentleman had been a faithful member of the church for many and was at one time a worker in the Sunday school. During recent years he devoted himself with untiring effort to the Veterans’ Association. He would greatly missed by the members of that body.

Mawson, Thomas Ashton - Mill Worker
1854 – 17 July 1915

Thomas Ashton was the son of George & Carol Mawson
Thomas was born 1854 in Liverpool. In 1861 the family were living in Kirkdale, Liverpool with George working as a grocer.

Thomas married Jane Milton 12 May 1872 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1881 they were living in Honley. They had three children: - Ashton (b1900), Arthur (b1884) and Harry (b1886). Jane died in 1889.

Living at 14 William Henry Street in Saltaire widower Thomas married Emma Sunderland (a widow, maiden name Halliday) 30 August 1890 at Bradford Cathedral. They had four children: - Clarice (b1893), Tom (served in WW1), Ada (b1898) and Charlotte May (b1900).

In 1891 the family were living at 24 Titus Street in Saltaire with Thomas working as a plush weaver. They lived at 30 Shirley Street in Saltaire from 1895. By 1901 they were living at 9 Shirley Street. From 1903 they lived in Shipley. By 1914 they had moved to 11 Constance Street in Saltaire. Working at Saltaire Mills Thomas died from anthrax 17 July 1915. (See war diary 23 July 1915.)

Metcalfe, Fred - WW1 Roll of Honour

Middleton, David - Mill Worker
1 April 1886 – 1968

David Middleton was the son of John William Middleton. John was born 1854 in Hunslet. He married Mary Ann Holgate 3 June 1876 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1881 they were living at 14 Moorhead Lane in Shipley with John employed as a warehouseman.

David, the fifth of 12 children, was born 1 April 1886 in Shipley. In 1891 the family were living at 22 William Henry Street in Saltaire with John working as a labourer. By 1901 they were at 37/38 Lower Green in Baildon with John employed as a warehouseman in a jam factory and David was a jobbing worsted spinner. In 1911 they were living at 3 Greenfold In Baildon with David working as a spinning/drawing overlooker. Mary Ann died in 1914; John in 1919.

David married Ellen Walker in 1913. They had a daughter, Mary, born 5 May 1919. Working at Saltaire Mills David did not serve in WW1.

Extract from a report in the Shipley Times 17 May 1918 as follows: -

Sixty-eight cases from Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons and Co., Ltd., Saltaire, were disposed of last Friday night by the Shipley Tribunal. Coun. T. Hill, J.P., presiding.

Postponements to various dates were given to the following (including) David Middleton, 32, married, 3, worsted drawing overlooker.

By 1928, David and Ellen were living at 22 Park Street in Shipley. Around 1932/33 Ellen, along with Sarah Brown and Polly Walker, moved to Morecambe where they bought and ran a boarding house at 14 Clarendon Road. David remained in Saltaire, lodging with Wilfred Walker. He joined his wife in Morecambe around 1935. In 1939 David was working in Morecambe as a deck chair attendant for Morecambe Corporation.

Report from the Morecambe Guardian 29 July 1939 as follows: -

SAVED FROM DROWNING
Holiday-Maker Rescues 10-Year-Old Girl
Hundreds of holiday makers witnessed the thrilling rescue of a 10-year-old girl, Elizabeth Lynch, of 52 Lord Street, Oswaldtwistle, at Morecambe on Thursday night.

Elizabeth was sailing a toy yacht in the boating pool at the West End. She overbalanced and fell into the water. A Corporation deck-chair attendant, David Middleton, of Clarendon Road, Morecambe, attracted by the girl's screams and the shouts of her younger brother, raced to the rescue and plunged into the water in his uniform. and carrying his money bag and ticket punch.
Meanwhile, a visitor, James Haldane, of Meadowbank Crescent, Edinburgh, had raced across the shore, jumped into the water and caught hold of the girl. He brought her to the shore unconscious and P.C. Pedder, of the South Lonsdale (Morecambe) Division applied artificial respiration until the arrival of the ambulance which took the girl to the Queen Victoria Hospital. She was detained until yesterday afternoon, when her parents took her back to her holiday lodgings.

In 1939 David served as an ARP warden in Morecambe. Ellen died 9 August 1958 in Morecambe. Report from the Morecambe Guardian 16 January 1959 as follows: -

Local Wills – Mrs Ellen Middleton of 14 Clarendon Road, Morecambe, formerly of Shipley, wife of David Middleton, retired boarding housekeeper, left £1,009 8s 11d gross, £944 8s 11d net.

David died in Lancaster district in 1968. He was a good cricketer, playing for Salt’s Mill and possible Saltaire.

Magnify Click on the images to magnify

David Middleton, aged about 20David Middleton, aged about 20.

David Middleton and family, c 1913.Family photograph circa 1913 with David at the back.

David Middleton and family, c 1930Family photograph circa 1930 with David second from the right.

Ellen and David MiddletonEllen and David Middleton, probably taken in Morecambe.

Biography compiled with the help of Nigel Holmes, grandson of David. Nigel also kindly supplied the photographs.

Middleton, Ellen (nee Walker)
24 June 1884 – 9 August 1958

Ellen Walker was the daughter of Edward Walker. Edward (known as Neddy) was born c1853 in Cleckheaton. He married Sarah Jane Stead 28 January 1882 at St John’s Halifax.

Ellen, the eldest of five children, was born 24 June 1884 in Cleckheaton. In 1901 they were living at 28 Shirley Street in Saltaire with Edward working as a mechanic fitter. By 1911 they had moved to 5 George Street.

Ellen worked in Saltaire Mills from around 1900 until her marriage. Ellen married David Middleton in 1913. They had a daughter, Mary, born 5 May 1919. By 1928, David and Ellen were living at 22 Park Street in Shipley. Around 1932/33 Ellen, along with Sarah Brown and Polly Walker, moved to Morecambe where they bought and ran a boarding house at 14 Clarendon Road. David remained in Saltaire, lodging with Wilfred Walker. He joined his wife in Morecambe around 1935. In 1939 David was working in Morecambe as a deck chair attendant for Morecambe Corporation.

Ellen died 9 August 1958 in Morecambe. Report from the Morecambe Guardian 16 January 1959 as follows: -
Local Wills – Mrs Ellen Middleton of 14 Clarendon Road, Morecambe, formerly of Shipley, wife of David Middleton, retired boarding housekeeper, left £1,009 8s 11d gross, £944 8s 11d net.

David died in Lancaster district in 1968.

Magnify Click on the images to magnify

Ellen WalkerEllen Walker – date unknown.

Ellen Walker and family, c 1913Family photograph circa 1913 with Ellen in front row second left with her mother to the right of her.

Ellen and David MiddletonEllen and David, probably taken in Morecambe.

Biography compiled with the help of Nigel Holmes, grandson of Ellen. Nigel also kindly supplied the photographs.

Midgeley, James Arthur - WW1 Roll of Honour

Midgley, Thomas - Mill Worker
1838 – 1916

Thomas was born in Eccleshill in 1838, the youngest of six children to William (b1791 Keighley) and Martha Midgley. Thomas married Sarah Batt 23 August 1857 at St Peters Leeds. They had two children: James (b1860) and Annis (born 1863). In 1861 they were living in Calverley with Thomas working as a cloth fuller. Sarah died in 1864 aged just 27. 

Widowed Thomas married Amelia Rawnsley, 11 November 1865, at Bradford Cathedral. They had five children:
Job (1866 – 13 January 1953)
Maria (b1869)
Mary (b1870)
Sarah (b1873)
John (b1877)

In 1871 they were living in Armley. In 1872 they moved to 12 Dove Street in Saltaire where they remained the rest of their lives. Thomas worked as a yarn scourer in Saltaire Mills.

Thomas died in 1916 and his widow, Amelia, died in 1920.

 
 
 
 
 
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