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Saltaire House Histories
Researched by Colin Coates
 

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Ada Street

Looking north, down Ada Street, Saltaire

1 Ada Street

No. 1 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by John Butterfield, a weaver aged 40, his wife Alice and four children, two of whom were spinners.

In 1871 John Rice, a labourer aged 33, lived in the house with his wife Sarah (nee Whitaker) and son, Albert, aged two.

Head of the house in the 1881 was 45-year-old Edward Smith, a cordwainer employing one man. He lived with his wife Jane, and their baby daughter Gertrude.

From before 1889 to around 1903 the house was occupied by the Milton family. Albert Milton was born c1864 in Wellington, Somerset. He married Emily Cordingley 25 March 1883 at Bradford Cathedral. They had seven children. Their son Alfred Milton was baptised 15 November 1889 at the Saltaire Wesleyan Methodist Church. Their eldest son, Holmes Milton, served in WW1. In 1891 Albert was employed as a woollen warp sizer, by 1901 he was a milk dealer. In 1891 they had a lodger living with them, Henry Pedley, a blacksmith’s striker, aged 23.

In 1911 Albert Hodgson Wilcock, a wool card grinder aged 23, lived in the house with his wife Amy, and their young daughter Gladys. Albert served in WW1 whilst his family were living in Todmorden.

In the 1939 Register (taken on 29 September) the house was vacant.

Birth notice in the Shipley Times 13 October 1943 as follows: -

Schofield – To Mr and Mrs H Schofield (nee Edna Ponder), 1 Ada Street, Saltaire – a son.

The following advert was placed in the Yorkshire Post 28 February 1944:

STRONG Boy or Girl, 14 to 16, for Milk Delivery; live as family; state age, wage, ref; short hours – H Schofield, 1 Ada Street, Shipley. Tel 2055.

From the Electoral Register 1904 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1904 – Tom Hymas
1906 to 1908 – Thomas West
1909 – Frederick Emmott
1910 – John Wilkinson Rhodes
1911 to 1912 – Albert Hodgson
1914 to 1938 – Henry & Lily Cosford (son Thomas Cosford WW2)
1945 – Frank Dixon
1946 to 1957 – Tom & Doris Baldwin
1958 to 1960 – Derek & Olive Ainsworth

 

2 Ada Street

No. 2 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to the Excell family. Samuel Excell, a stone mason, was born 23 February 1823 at Wotton Under Edge, Gloucestershire. He married Susanna Murgatroyd 8 February 1846 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley. They had at least five children.

In 1871 the house was occupied by the Riley family, who remained there until 1900. John Riley, a wool dyer, was born c1838 in Halifax. He married Sarah Clayton 20 July 1862 at Bradford Cathedral. They had four children; Carrie (born c1862), Constance (c1867), Fred (c1874) and Walter (1877). Walter died aged nine months in November 1877. In 1891 Sarah was a widow living in the house with Constance, a reeler and Fred, a botany comber.

In 1901 the house was home to Harry Hailstone, a wool warehouseman aged 25. He had married Emily Haley 19 December 1896 at Bradford Cathedral. They had a son, John, born in 1898.

Head of the house in 1911 was Tom Knott, a quarryman. Tom was born 12 July 1878 in Windhill. He married Elizabeth Pearson in 1905. They had one child, but it died as an infant. Tom died 22 May 1911 and was buried with his parents in Nab Wood Cemetery Shipley.

In 1919 Robert McLure Haggerty was living in the house.

In a report in the Shipley Times 21 November 1924, Alec Dearnley a cloth finisher of 2 Ada St was a witness at an inquest into a young boy being fatally knocked down by a car in Bradford Road, Shipley.

In the 1939 Register the house was occupied by Fred Tate (born 22 January 1910) and his wife Alice (nee Wilde born 20 March 1913). They were both employed as textile weavers.

From the Electoral Register 1904 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1904 – Mary Jane Murgatroyd
1905 – Tom Hymas
1907 – Annie Newell
1910 to 1911 – Tom Knott
1912 to 1915 – Isaac White
1918 to 1919 – Emma Haggerty
1920 – Emma Haggerty & Austin McQuillan
1921 to 1925 – Alexander Dearnley
1926 to 1936 – John & Annie Moore
1938 to 1960 – Fred & Alice Tate

 

3 Ada Street

No. 3 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census head of the house was Craven Butterfield, a warp dresser born 28 September 1835 in Thornton. He had married Martha Silley 27 September 1858 at St Paul’s Shipley. They had two sons living with them, George and John Butterfield.

In 1871 the occupants were Benjamin Hallam, a wool sorter aged 25, his wife Sarah (nee Bottomley, aged 24) and their young daughter Hannah. Benjamin married Sarah 22 April 1867 at Bradford Cathedral.

By 1879 the house was occupied by the Gill family when John Henry, son of Thomas Gill, died 30 April, aged just 12. Thomas was a labourer born c1829 in Keswick. He was married to Isabella (maiden name and date of marriage unknown). Thomas died before 1881 leaving widowed Isabella living at 3 Ada Street with three children, all of whom were mill workers. 1884 was a sad year for Isabella; her son, Joseph, died 31 May aged just 19, then her daughter, Mary Jane, died 21 November aged just 21. Mary Jane was buried 24 November at Hirst Wood Cemetery Shipley.

In the Electoral Register of 1885 Joshua Hainsworth is listed as living in the house.

In 1891 the house was lived in by Thomas O’Hara, a mill worker aged 45, his wife Ann, two daughters and one stepdaughter. The three girls were all millworkers. Thomas died 25 September 1898. In 1901 widowed Ann was living in the house with her daughter Lily and a boarder Richard Ferguson, a nursery propagator aged 21.

In 1911 Arthur Gibson, a weaving overlooker aged 29, was the head, living with him were his wife Lily (nee O’Hara) aged 30 and daughter May, aged four. Arthur had married Lily, the daughter of Thomas & Sarah, 8 August 1904, at St Paul’s Shipley.

In the 1939 Register the house was occupied by Robert Askam, a window cleaner born 12 November 1908 and his wife Grace (nee Baker) a worsted spinner born 15 August 1908. They were married 30 July 1932 at St Peter’s Shipley. Robert served in WW2. Robert died in the house in January 1991. His widow, Grace died in the house 14 March 1991.

From the Electoral Register 1912 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1912 to 1914 – Ann O’Hara
1918 to 1921 – Louisa Naylor
1922 – Louisa & John Naylor
1923 to 1932 – James & Margaret Knipe, Wilfred Barnes
1933 to 1960 – Robert & Grace Askam

 

4 Ada Street

No. 4 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Joseph Turner, an engine tenter aged 46, his wife Maria (nee Hudson) 37, and their four children. Joseph married Maria 4 February 1850 at Bradford Cathedral.

The 1871 census has Johnson Pitts as the head of the house. He was a cordwainer aged 32 living with his wife Maria aged 31, and their son John aged two. Johnson was a member of the Windhill Friendly Society.

In 1881 the head of house was a seventy-year-old widow, Ann Sutcliffe (nee Shuttleworth). Also, in the house were her married daughter, Asenath, a weaver aged 40 and her two children, Mary, 12, and Wesley, aged 10 months, along with a boarder, Thomas Illingworth a worsted overlooker aged 46.

The house was occupied in 1891 by Robert Williams, a factory foreman aged 40, with his wife, Martha (nee Ince), 34, and daughter Mary aged 8. Robert married Martha 28 February 1880 at Bradford Cathedral.

In 1901 the house was occupied by William Ransley, a twister born 1841 in Kentish Town Middlesex, his wife Elizabeth, 59 and their unmarried daughter Emily,28, who also worked as a twister. From 1904 until 1919 the house was occupied by a widowed female, Elizabeth Robinson (nee Lord). In the 1911 census Elizabeth was aged 68 and living with her was her daughter Ada, 31, her widowed daughter Matilda Humble, 39, and her granddaughter Laura Humble, aged 12.

In the 1939 Register the house was occupied by Elizabeth Oates a widow born 27 May 1862 and her unmarried son William born 6 January 1894. William was an unemployed labourer.

From the Electoral Register 1912 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1912 to 1919 – Elizabeth Robinson
1921 to 1922 – Kendall & Ada Crossland
1923 to 1927 – Thomas & Christiana Henry
1928 to 1929 – Fred & Sarah Lancaster
1930 to 1933 – Fred Lancaster, Leslie & Sarah Whitaker
1934 to 1945 – Elizabeth & William Oates
1946 to 1960 – William Oates

 

5 Ada Street

No. 5 Ada Street was built around 1856. From before the 1861 census to 1906 the house was occupied by the Drake family. Jonas Drake was born 2 December 1806 in Thornton. He married Barbara Ingham 30 March 1834 in Bradford Cathedral. In 1861 he was a combing machine minder living with Barbara who was a weaver and four children, three of whom were mill workers. Sarah Ingham, Barbara’s widow mother was also living with them. Jonas died in 1867. In 1871 widowed Barbara was a housekeeper. Living with her were two of her children, a daughter-in-law, a granddaughter and a boarder, John Farley a wool comber aged 25. Barbara died 10 December 1876.

In 1881 widow Sarah Drake (nee Foster), a charwoman aged 39 was head of the house. Living with her were her four children; Martha the eldest at 13 was a spinner. Foster, the youngest at two, would serve in World War One. Sarah had married Edward Drake, 27 July 1863, at St Wilfrid’s Calverley. Edward died 24 July 1880 aged just 37. In 1891 Sarah was living with three of her children all of whom were mill workers. In 1901 just her youngest child, Foster, was living with her.

In 1911 the house was occupied by John Wilcock Greaves, a wool comber at Saltaire Mills aged 33, his wife Clara (nee Ward) aged 27 and their infant son Albert. In the 1939 Register the house was occupied by Arthur Howker a boot repairer born 22 December 1880. Arthur died in the house 21 February 1945. Arthur had served in WW1.

From the Electoral Register 1907 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1907 to 1909 – Frederick Emmott
1911 to 1915 – John Greaves
1918 to 1920 – Clara Lee
1921 to 1945 – Arthur Howker
1946 to 1948 – Frank & Gladys Smithies
1949 to 1960 – James & Doreen Barstow

 

6 Ada Street

No. 6 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 & 1871 censuses head of the house was Ann Burberry a widow born c1812 in Bradford who worked as a reeler. Living with her was her son Isaac a wool sorter born c1842 in Bradford. In 1861 two boarders, George Wroe a farm labourer aged 27 and his wife Jane (nee Butcher), a worsted hanker aged 29, lived with her. Ann died in 1877.

The following legal notice is from the Shipley Times 29 July 1876: -

I HENRY UNWIN of 6 Ada Street Saltaire, Hereby Give Notice that I will NOT BE RESPONSIBLE for any debt or debts my Wife, Phoebe, may contract after this date. (Signed)Saturday 26 July 1876.”
In 1881 the house was occupied by William Whiting a wool comber aged 64, his wife Susan aged and three children, two of whom were mill workers.
From 1889 to 1915 the house was home to the Humphreys family.
Death notice in the Shipley Times 13 July 1889 as follows: -
“On the 7thof July, aged 12 months, Alfred son of John William Humphreys, 6 Ada Street.”
John William born c1865 in Saltaire was a son of Samuel Humphreys and Jane Kellett. They were married 30 August 1856 in Bradford Cathedral.
In 1891 Jane was living at 6 Ada Street without her husband. Living with her were two spinster daughters; Elizabeth aged 33 and Martha aged 24. Martha died in August 1891. In 1901 & 1911 Jane and spinster Elizabeth were in residence. Jane died in 1915.
“In Memoriam” notice from the Shipley Times 6 September 1918 as follows: -
“DUNN – In loving memory of a dear friend, Private Willie Dunn, Frontiersman, beloved husband of Lottie Dunn, 6 Ada Street, Saltaire, who died “somewhere in Africa,” 12 September 1917.
From his pal, H Firth.”

From 1921 the house was home to Arthur Goldsbrough a cloth warehouseman born 14 August 1892 and his wife, Harriet Goldsbrough (nee Smith) a cloth picker born 16 November 1893.
Harriet died in 1951. Arthur died in 1967.

From the Electoral Register 1918 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1918 to 1920 – Lottie Dunn
1921 to 1950 – Arthur & Harriet Goldsbrough
1951 to 1952 – Arthur Goldsbrough & Beatrice Thornton
1953 to 1960 – Arthur Goldsbrough, Ethel Goldsbrough & Ethel Parker.

 

7 Ada Street

No 7. Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 & 1871 censuses the house was occupied by the Waugh family. William Waugh was born 1821 in Queensberry. He married Hannah Rusher 9 June 1840 at Bradford Cathedral. They had at least eight children. William worked as a stoker and then as an engine tenter.

Rebecca Sanctuary aged 29, daughter of John Sanctuary of 7 Ada Street married Heaton Moseley, a weaver aged 50, of 42 Titus Street, 23 May 1874, at Bradford Cathedral. John died 3 November 1877 aged 77. Heaton & Rebecca lived in the house with Rebecca’s son John until 1899 when Heaton died.

In 1901 Ellen Mounsey (nee Smith), a widow aged 62 from Guiseley was living in the house with her son Benjamin, a plasterer’s labourer aged 32.

In 1911 the house was occupied by Arthur Iredale, a yarn scourer aged 33 and his wife Emma (nee Tennant), a weaver aged 29. They were married in 1907. As a worker at Saltaire Mills, Arthur did not serve in WW1. Emma died 7 January 1946. Arthur was still living in the house in 1960. Arthur died in 1961.

 

8 Ada Street

No. 8 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by John Moore, a wool sorter aged 40 born in Bradford, his wife Ann and four children, two of whom worked as spinners.

In 1871 the head of the house was Marmaduke Drake, aged 41 from Kettlewell; he was out of work. Living with him was his wife Elizabeth and six children. John, the eldest child at 14 was a weaver.

In 1881 the house was occupied by William Parker, a 29 year-old wool sorter from Bradford, his wife Sarah (nee Little) and two young daughters. William and Sarah were married in Bradford Cathedral 21 September 1874. They lost a son, William, who died 7 October 1881 aged just two months.

From before 1891 to 1951 the house was home to the Dunn family. In the censuses 1891,1901 and 1911, head of the house was Bridget Dunn a widowed female born c1834 in Ireland. Living with her were two spinster daughters, Mary, born in Ireland c1861 and Bessie, born 1865 in Ireland. All three were mill workers. Bridget died in 1925; Mary died 1st Qtr. 1939. In the 1939 register Bessie was living in the house with Florence Emmott a wool comber born in 1906. Bessie died 1st Qtr. 1951.

From the Electoral Register 1912 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1912 to 1925 – Bridget Dunn
1926 to 1929 – Bessie Dunn
1929 to 1950 – Bessie Dunn & Florence Emmott
1951 to 1960 – Florence Emmott

 

9 Ada Street

No. 9 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Hartley Firth, a dyer aged 49, his wife Elizabeth (nee Wilkinson), two daughters both of whom were mill workers and a boarder, Mary Hartley a spinner aged 18. Everybody in the house was born in Haworth. Hartley and Elizabeth were married 7 June 1835 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1871 Thomas Dinsdale, a striker aged 35 from Bradford, lived in the house with his wife Elizabeth (nee Goodison), four young children and a boarder, Margaret Blackhurst, a weaver aged 47. Hartley and Eliza were married in 1861. One of their daughters, Christiana died 21 October 1877 aged just 15.

From before 1881 to 1901 the house was home to the Marshall family. William Marshall was born c1851 in Rawdon. He married Sarah Wood 3 March 1877 at the Register Office Bradford. They had eight children, two of whom died as infants. In 1881 William was working as a warehouseman, in 1891 and 1901 he was a watch repairer. John Marshall aged just nine months died 30 December 1885.

In 1911 Hannah Peterson (nee Emmett) a widow aged 59 lived in the house with her father Thomas Emmett, a retired stone mason aged 80, and two adult sons. Lance Corporal Richard Turner, of 9 Ada Street, is reported, 4 December 1914, as being wounded. He served in the 1st Gloucestershire Regiment.

Lance Corporal John Scull, of 9 Ada Street, is reported, 21 June 1918, as being a prisoner of war. He served in the Notts and Derbyshire Regiment. Weaver James Scull, father of John, is a witness at an inquest into the death of a cyclist near the Rosse Hotel 3 June 1921. In 1927 John & Grace Scull with their daughters Beatrice and Ellen emigrated to Victoria, Australia

In the 1939 Register spinster Ada Wood lived alone in the house. Ada was born 1 September 1880; she worked as a cook in a works canteen.

From the Electoral Register 1918 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1918 to 1920 – James Scull
1921 to 1922 – James & John Scull
1923 to 1926 – John Scull
1927 to 1928 – Margaret Wood
1929 – Margaret & Ada Wood
1930 to 1960 – Ada Wood

 

10 Ada Street

No. 10 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 & 1871 censuses the house was occupied by James Maden and his wife Maria (nee Greenwood). James was born 1810 in Bacup in Lancashire (near Burnley). He married Maria 17 June 1841 at St Paul’s Shipley. They had no children. James worked as a warehouseman and labourer. In 1861 they had living with them John Maden, a nephew aged 14 who was a spinner, and a boarder, Ann Harrison, a widow aged 39 who was a weaver. In 1871 they had living with them, Mary Maden, a niece aged 25 who was a servant.

In 1881 and 1891 the house was occupied by the Whitaker family. William Whitaker was born c1834 in Hebden Bridge. He married Sarah Sanctuary, 22 November 1868, at Bradford Cathedral. In 1881 William worked as a weaver and Sarah was a burler. They had living with them two young children, their married daughter Annie, who was a drawer aged 19, and her husband William Dyson who was a dyer aged 20. In 1891 they just had their two children with them, William was still a weaver, and both the children were mill workers.

In 1901 the house was occupied by John Coulton a grocer’s assistant aged 28 and his wife Ellen (nee Wood) a wool comb minder. They were married in 1897.

In the 1911 census the head of the house was Maria Hurley (nee Connor) a wool comber aged 29. Maria was married but her husband was not with her. Living with her were two young daughters and her sister Harriet Connor who was a wool comber aged 21.

In the 1939 register Maurice Cole, a spinner born 30 August 1910, lived in the house with his wife, Violet, who was born 2 August 1937. They were married in 1937.

From the Electoral Register 1898 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1898 to 1901 – Ernest Pringle
1902 to 1903 – John Coulton
1905 to 1909 – Ellen Holt
1910 – William Newbould
1913 to 1918 – William & Ellen Perrin
1919 to 1920 – Sarah Scott
1921 to 1923 – Wilfred & Sarah Lodge
1924 to 1926 – George & Mary Thompson
1927 to 1931 – Charles Hogg & Amy Hogg (Charles served in WW1)
1932 to 1935 – Charles Hogg
1936 – Charles Hogg & Agnes Hogg
1938 to 1940 – Maurice and Violet Cole
1945 – Margaret Marshall & Ethel Thomson
1946 to 1952 – William & Ethel Thompson
1953 to 1960 – Elizabeth Ann Ockwell

 

11 Ada Street

No. 11 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by four sisters with the surname of Simpson. They were Susannah a twister aged 24, Ann a weaver 18, Mary a spinner 15 and Jane a spinner 12.

In 1871 the house was occupied by Edwin Holdsworth, a weaving overlooker at Saltaire Mills, aged 32 from Horton, his wife Harriet (nee Driver) and four young sons. The eldest son Arthur worked as a spinner aged just nine. Edwin and Harriet were married in 1861.

In 1881 James Gaskell, a mill worker aged 43 from Ranow, Cheshire lived in the house with his wife Emma and seven children. Five of the children were mill workers.

In 1891 the house was occupied by Charles Walker, an iron moulder aged 31 and his wife Sophia (nee Kaye) a silk picker aged 28. They were married 21 July 1883 at Bradford Cathedral.

In 1901 Ellen Thornton (nee Jeffrey) aged 34 was the head of the house living without her husband Farrar Thornton. Four children lived with her, two of whom were mill workers. Ellen died 6 December 1902, aged just 35.

In 1911 the house was occupied by Fred Neale aged 25 and his wife Maud (nee White) aged 26. They were married 26 Oct 1907 at St Paul’s Shipley. Fred worked for a loom maker, he served in WW1 and survived; he was a member of Saltaire Angling Club.

In November 1917 Herbert Lupton of 11 Ada Street won a money prize for the best football report in the Shipley Times. In December 1917 there was a football report in the Shipley Times written by Alfred Ponder of 11 Ada Street.

In 1939 the house was home to Harry Ratcliffe a dyers labourer born 25 September 1901 and his wife Minnie a worsted twister born 1 October 1904.

From the Electoral Register 1897 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1897 to 1900 – John Hasslewood
1901 to 1903 – Ellen Thornton
1904 to 1908 – Frank Adlum
1910 to 1912 – Fred & Maude Neale
1913 to 1918 – Arthur Ponder
1920 to 1925 – Herbert & Mary Lodge
1926 to 1927 – John Mawson
1928 to 1938 – John & Alice Mawson
1939 to 1956 – Harry & Minnie Ratcliffe
1957 – Harry, Minnie & Edith Ratcliffe
1958 – Harry & Minnie Ratcliffe and Edith Oddy
1960 – Harry & Minnie Ratcliffe.

 

12 Ada Street

No. 12 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by two families whose heads were Silas Stead and Thomas Illingworth. Silas Stead was born 1 September 1913 in Wakefield. He married Ann Kendall 15 September 1833 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley. In 1861 Silas was an engine tenter living with Ann and four children, two of whom were mill workers. Thomas Illingworth was born c1833 in Colne, Lancashire. He married Elizabeth Stead 15 October 1859 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1861 they were both weavers with a daughter Mary Ann born 1860. In 1871 the house was occupied by Silas Stead a wool comber, his wife Ann, their married daughter Jane, aged 19, and her husband John Wood a dyer aged 22.

Fred Wood, son of John & Jane Wood of 12 Ada Street, died 16 May 1880 aged just one year. In the 1881 census, taken on 3 April, John Wood was the head of the house working as a painter. He had his wife Jane and three young children living with him. One month later on 3 May John died aged just 32. In 1891 widow Jane was the head of the house living with her three children. Jane worked as silk weaver and her children were all mill workers.

In 1901 the house was home to George Trotter a platelayer’s labourer aged 26, his wife Sarah Elizabeth (nee Perrin) and their daughter Annie who was born in 1899. George and Sarah, who was from Leicestershire, were married 5 August 1898 at St Paul’s Shipley.

In 1911 the house was occupied by Joseph Potter, a wool comber aged 49 from Wellington, Somerset, his wife Eliza (nee Robinson) a worsted drawer aged 49 and their daughter Maria, a spinner, aged 23. Eliza and Joseph were married 5 February 1895 at St Paul’s Shipley. Joseph died in 1912 aged 50.

In 1939 the house was occupied by widow Eliza Potter, her married daughter Maria Senior and Florence Robinson a worsted winder aged 22.

From the Electoral Register 1893 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1893 to 1895 – Jane Wood
1896 to 1899 – James McBurnie
1901 to 1902 – George & Sarah Trotter
1903 – Elijah Wilcock
1905 to 1908 – John Greenwood
1909 – Herbert Baker
1911 – Arthur Craven
1912 – Joseph Potter
1914 to 1915 – Eliza Potter
1918 to 1920 – Eliza Potter & Maria Robinson
1921 to 1922 – Eliza Potter
1923 to 1924 – Eliza Potter & Joss Senior
1925 to 1928 – Eliza Potter
1929 to 1934 – Eliza Potter, Maria Senior & Albert Beevers
1935 to 1936 – Eliza Potter & Maria Senior
1938 to 1939 – Eliza Potter, Maria Senior & Florence Robinson
1945 – Eliza Potter, Maria Senior & Kenneth Brickley (Kenneth Brickley served in WW2.) 1946 to 1951 – Eliza Potter & Maria Senior
1952 to 1954 – Maria Senior
1955 to 1960 – Mary Firth

Eliza Potter died 17 June 1951 and was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery Shipley. Her daughter, Maria Senior, joined her when she died 31 October 1954.

 

13 Ada Street

No. 13 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Edward Smith a shoemaker from Eldwick aged 52, his wife Hannah and eight children. Six of the children were mill workers, one was a shoemaker and the youngest was at school.

In 1871 the head of the house was Rachael Illingworth a widow aged 54. She had five children living with her, four of whom were millworkers.

In 1881 the house was occupied by Thomas Fowler, a wool sorter aged 39 from Long Preston, his wife Elizabeth and five children. The two eldest children aged 12 and 10 were mill workers.

Samuel Stapleton aged 45, of 13 Ada Street, died 25 August 1885. He was buried 29 August in Hirst Wood Cemetery Shipley.

In the Electoral Register, November 1885, Edward Creek is listed as living in the house.
In 1891 & 1901 the house was lived in by the Judson family. James Judson a mill labourer was born c1862 in Hovingham North Yorkshire. He married Sarah Sedgewick 15 July 1882 in Hovingham. They had five children, one of whom died as an infant. Their sons Harold Judson & Sydney Judson both served in WW1. In 1891 Sarah’s widowed mother Ann Sedgwick aged 68 lived with them.

In 1911 the head of the house was James Pickard a bricklayer’s labourer aged 37 from Baildon. Living with him was his wife Elizabeth Ann (nee Firth) and daughter Clara aged four. James married Elizabeth 11 September 1897 at Bradford Cathedral. Jack Barnes, a machinist aged 27 was lodging with them along with his wife Ida and their son George aged one.

Report from the Shipley Times 23 October 1937 as follows:

No Wireless Licence
At Bradford West Riding Court on Thursday, Thomas Huntley of 13 Ada Street, Saltaire, was charged with having no licence on 16 September.
For the prosecution Herbert H Cave stated that when the defendant was seen about the offence, he said he was unemployed and could not afford to pay for the licence. Since then defendant had taken out a licence.
The Magistrate’s Clerk (Mr Arthur Cragg): Do you know you cannot work the wireless without taking out a licence?
Defendant said he thought if he paid the money within twelve months he was in order.
Supt. Spires: He forgot to take out his dog licence the same time.
Defendant was fined 10s.

In the 1939 Register the house was occupied by Isabel Nichols a canteen worker born 27 June 1904 and Thomas Ratcliffe a steel work labourer born 20 November 1900.

Report in the Shipley Times 7 February 1945:

Salvation Army Wedding
Adjutant S. Preece conducted the wedding at the Salvation Army Citadel on Saturday, between Mr. George Thornton, of 13 Ada Street. Saltaire and Miss Doris Swift, of 23 Albert Street, Woodbottom. Baildon The bride Is a regular attender at the Citadel and has been actively Identified with the Salvation Army for some time.

From the Electoral Register 1902 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1902 to 1907 – James Judson
1908 to 1913 – James Pickard
1915 – William Houghton
1918 to 1924 – Albert & Maggie Jones
1925 to 1926 – Albert Jones
1927 to 1929 – Susannah Hardy
1930 – Susannah & Nathan Hardy
1931 – Susannah, Nathan & Elsie Hardy
1932 – Susannah Hardy
1933 – Susannah, Elsie & Jan Hardy, Gladys Lancaster
1935 – Hannah Huntley
1936 to 1938 – Hannah & Thomas Huntley
1939 to 1945 – Isabel Nichols
1947 to 1954 – Eric & Mabel Hopwood
1955 to 1960 – Kathleen & Raymond Booth

 

14 Ada Street

No. 14 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Abraham Hartley a comber aged 53 from Haworth, his wife Zilpher (nee Hartley, they shared the same surname) and seven children. All the children except the youngest were born in Haworth and four of them worked in the mill. Abraham and Zilpher married 25 November 1845 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1871 the occupants were Eber Armitage, a weaver aged 33, his wife Elizabeth (nee Oldfield), three young children, William Simpson a nephew aged 15 who worked as weaver There was also a lodger Jane Learoyd, a weaver aged 37, and her seven-month-old son.

The Shipley Times showed the death on 12 December 1876 of Ann, wife of George Thornton, aged 29 of 14 Ada Street.

By 1879 the occupants were Joseph Mitchell, a watchman born c1842 in Thornton, his wife, Grace (nee Hartley) and two daughters, one of whom, Susannah Mitchell, worked in a mill. Joseph and Grace were married 4 April 1863 at Bradford Cathedral.

Report in the Shipley Times 4 October 1879 as follows:

A domestic servant, named Mary Hartley, aged 47, and for the past three months in the employ of Mr. Shaw, dyer, of Cross Banks, Shipley, committed suicide on Thursday last, at the house of her sister in Ada Street, Saltaire.
It appears that deceased had been in a depressed state of mind for some time, and in consequence of being unwell, her sister, a Mrs. Mitchell, invited her to take up her abode at their house until she recovered.
About half-past ten o'clock on the morning of the day named, Mrs. Mitchell had occasion to go to a shop close by, and left her unfortunate sister in the house, downstairs, eating some bread and meat. When the absent woman returned, about ten minutes to eleven, she found her relative suspended from a hook in the ceiling by a cord used as a clothes' line. An overturned stool was suggestive of how she had come into that position. Singularly enough, the suicide did not run the rope into a noose, but simply placed it behind her ears wad around her neck. She was cut down by a neighbour, who was sent for, but life was found to be quite extinct.
Last evening, an inquest on the body was held at the Ring of Bells Inn, before Mr. Coroner Barstow, when, after hearing evidence from Mrs. Mitchell and the man Keeling who cut down the suicide, the jury returned a verdict of " committed death by hanging whilst under temporary insanity."

In the Electoral Register November 1885 Arthur Sharp is listed as living in the house.
In 1891 the occupants were Joseph Robinson aged 52, his wife Hannah and five children, four of whom were mill workers. Hannah and Joseph were married 16 December 1868 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1901 the house was home to the Spencer family. Holdsworth Spencer was a stone mason born 1877 in Saltaire. He married Ada Anderson in 1897; they had five children. Holdsworth served in WW1 and was killed in action 12 May 1917.

In 1911 the occupants were William Summerhill an iron foundry labourer aged 36 and his wife Susannah (nee Woodward). They were married 12 July 1902 in Bingley.

Philip Gargon living at 14 Ada Street, enlisted as a Private with the 18th Service Battalion Prince of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment (2nd Bradford Pals) 22 March 1915. He was discharged medically unfit for service 28 June 1916. He was always short of breath and often coughing up blood, probably caused by his years of working as a stone mason. He died in 1920.

In the 1939 Register Herbert Hague a woolcomber aged 35 was living in the house with his wife Elizabeth and two children.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 – Joseph Robinson
1893 – Oliver Paley
1895 to 1899 – Henry Easthill
1901 to 1908 – Holdsworth Spencer
1911 to 1912 – William Summerhill
1913 to 1914 – Philip Gargon
1918 to 1929 – Susannah Illingworth
1930 to 1935 – Harry & Mary Railton
1938 to 1939 – Herbert & Elizabeth Hague
1945 – Kathleen Fletcher
1946 to 1951 – Kathleen & George Fletcher
1952 to 1960 – Florrie Cockshott

 

15 Ada Street

No. 15 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by William Smith a weaving overlooker aged 32 from Cowling, his wife Elizabeth, three young children and a lodger, Jane Spencer, a drawer aged 39.

In 1871 the occupants were Samuel Glover Crabtree a weaving overlooker aged 30 from Idle, his wife Elizabeth (nee Dibb) and four young children. Samuel married Elizabeth 24 December 1864 at Bradford Cathedral.

By 1879 the house was occupied by the Keeling family. John Keeling was born in Derby c1811. He married Martha a lady 19 years younger than him. (Maiden name and date of marriage unknown.) They had three children. Martha died 27 June 1879.
In the 1881 census widower John was a railway labourer. Living with him were two of his children and a grandchild.

Report from the Shipley Times 25 July 1885 as follows:

An Accident of a rather serious nature occurred at the slaughterhouse, Saltaire. While some children were watching the operations of the butchers, a cart belonging to Mr Schofield, of Bradford Road, was being backed up to the slaughterhouse door for the purpose of being loaded with meat, when a boy named Samuel Hardy, aged 9, son of Moses Hardy, joiner, Ada Street, was jammed between the cart and the wall, sustaining a severe cut at the back of his right ear. He was conveyed to Sir Titus Salt's Hospital, where, under the care of Mr Carter, the little fellow is progressing favourably.

In the 1886 Electoral Register Moses Hardy is listed as living in the house.

Report from Shipley Times 13 August 1887 as follows:

Drunk and Riotous – Moses Hardy, millhand, 15 Ada Street, was summoned for being drunk and riotous on Friday night last at Saltaire. Constable Warrender proved the case, and the defendant, who did not appear, was fined 10s, and costs or 10 days.

Moses was born 1850 in Baildon. He married Violetta Rushworth in 1871. They had 11 children with one dying as an infant. In the 1891 census Moses was a joiner with two of his children working in a mill. Sadly, his sons, Orlando Hardy and Jesse Briggs Hardy both died serving their country in WW1.

In 1901 John Ince, a railway plate layer aged 49 was living in the house by himself. John had married Grace Firth, 12 January 1876, at Bradford Cathedral. They had at least three children. In 1901 Grace was living with her children at 39 Helen Street.

In 1911 the occupants were Sarah Huddlestone (nee Thompson) a widow aged 68 and her nephew Arthur Harold Thompson a worsted cramper aged 22. They were both born in Cambridgeshire. Arthur served his country in WW1.

In 1918 the house was occupied by Edward Critchley who served his country in WW1.

In the 1939 Register the occupants were Jane Simpson a textile spinner born 25 December 1901 and Marjorie Simpson born 16 June 1926.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1893 – Moses Hardy
1895 to 1901 – John Ince
1902 to 1907 – William Thompson
1909 to 1915 – Sarah Huddlestone
1918 – Edward Critchley
1919 to 1936 - Thomas & Betty Hyden
(1921 with Luther Whatmuff; 1929 to 1931 with Ethel Whatmuff)
1938 – Cecil, Jane, Marjorie & Renee Simpson
1939 – Cecil & Jane Simpson
1945 to 1947 – Charlotte Snowden
1948 – Charlotte & Dennis Rowley
1949 to 1951 – Evelyn, Francis & Ivy Ambler
1952 to 1953 – Evelyn & Francis Ambler
1954 to 1958 – Evelyn Ambler
1960 – George & Lily Jackson.

 

16 Ada Street

No. 16 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Edward Hartley a wool sorter aged 32, his wife Mary and three young children

From before 1871 to 1893 the house was the home of the Brown family. William Brown was born c1835 in Armley. He married Ellen Riley 27 August 1859 at Bradford Cathedral. They had at least six children. In 1871 William was a dyer; living with him and his family was a widow aunt, Sarah Guthrie aged 60. William died before 1881. In the 1881 census widow Ellen had five of her children living with her and her widowed mother. Alice Riley aged 83. Ellen and four of the children were mill workers. Jesse Hardy, aged 14 of 16 Ada Street, was buried 11 July 1888. In the 1891 census the occupants were Ellen, three of her children and Alice her mother. Alice died at 16 Ada Street 18 January 1893 aged 93. Ellen died in the house 4 November 1893.

Report from the Shipley Times 25 February 1899 as follows:

West Riding Court Bradford, Monday – Vaccination Case
Henry Whincup of Ada Street, Saltaire, applied for a certificate of exemption from vaccination in respect of his son Henry.
Applicant made the usual declaration, and in reply to the chairman said his objection vaccination arose from the fact he had a cousin who was a cripple through it and had a brother who had lost a child through it.
The application was granted.

In 1901 the house was occupied by Henry Whincup a mill carter aged 33, his wife Sarah (nee Carter), their two young sons and Sarah’s widowed mother Elizabeth Carter aged 67. Henry and Sarah were married 28 October 1895 at Holy Trinity church, Bingley.
In 1911 head of house was Arthur Falkingham a tram driver/conductor aged 27. He lived with his wife Beatrice (nee Scull) aged 23 and their daughter Lily aged 3. Arthur and Beatrice were married in 1906.

In the 1939 Register the house was home to Walter Cox, a spinner’s warehouseman born 3 July 1892, his wife Mary (nee Filbey) born 18 September 1901, William Cox, an apprentice spinning overlooker born 24 May 1918 and Harry Cox, an apprentice mechanical engineer born 23 September 1921. Walter Cox served in WW1 as an able seaman in the Royal Navy. He married Mary while home on leave in 1914. William Cox served in WW2. Harry Cox of 16 Ada Street married Kathleen Crawshaw of 37 Taunton Street Shipley 26 November 1949 at St Paul’s Shipley.

From the Electoral Register 1898 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1898 to 1902 – Henry Whincup
1905 to 1909 – Alfred Denning
1910 to 1913 – Arthur Falkingham
1915 – Mary Rawnsley
1918 to 1920 – Henry & Martha Hirst
1921 – Walter Cox
1922 to 1960 – Walter & Mary Cox

 

17 Ada Street

No. 17 Ada Street was built around 1856.In the 1861 census the house was home to William Jackson a weaving overlooker aged 33, his wife Ellen and three young children. They had lived in Halifax.

In 1871 & 1881 the occupants were the Berry family. James Berry was born c1843 in Bradford. He married Grace Glover 1 March 1871 at Bradford Cathedral. They had at least three children. James worked as a mechanic. James was on the electoral register for 17 Ada Street in 1886.

From before 1891 to 1909 the occupants were the Hughes family. Edwin Hughes was born c1859 in Camden Town, London. He married Mary Caygill, from Esholt, 6 June 1885 at Bradford Cathedral. They had at least 2 children. Edwin worked as a tailor.

In 1911 the occupants were Frederick Britton a wool comber aged 43, his wife Clara (nee Morris) and six children. Frederick and Clara were married 16 February 1889 at St Michael’s Cottingley.

In the Shipley Times 28 December 1929 and 26 April 1930, L Knowles of 17 Ada Street is listed as winning prizes at the Shipley Dog Show.

From 1931 the house was occupied by Anthony McGowan, his wife Clara and their son, Anthony McGowan jnr.

In the 1939 Register Ernest Parker born 6 February 1912 lived in the house with his wife Winifred (nee Wilton) born 25 January 1915. Ernest, an electric welder, had married Winifred in 1933.

Report from the Shipley Times 22 December 1943 as follows:

Saltaire Cyclist’s Lights
A fine of 10s was imposed on Ernest Parker (31) electric welder, of 17 Ada Street, Saltaire, for riding a bicycle without a red rear light.
P.W. R. Robson said that at 7.30 a.m. November 19 he saw the defendant in Commercial Street, Shipley, riding a bicycle without front or rear lights. He pointed out the offence to him and he said “I took the batteries off last night. I don't often use the cycle on a Friday."

From the Electoral Register 1912 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1912 to 1915 – Frederick Britton
1919 to 1927 – William Henry Clay (served in WW1)
1928 to 1930 – Leonard & Edith Knowles
1931 to 1932 – Anthony, Clara & Anthony(jnr.) McGowan, Margaret Fern
1933 – Anthony & Clara McGowan, Margaret Fern
1934 – Clara McGowan & Margaret Fern
1935 – Ernest Parker
1936 to 1939 – Ernest & Winifred Parker
1945 – Winifred Parker
1946 – Winifred Parker & George Glasby
1947 to 1949 – Doris & Leslie Holmes
1950 to 1960 – Doris & James Holmes

 

18 Ada Street

No. 18 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to Thomas Haigh a wool sorter aged 45, his wife Hannah and five children. They had lived in Cullingworth.

In 1871 the occupants were David Dyson a wool sorter aged 31 from Halifax, his wife Louisa (nee Mitchell), two young children and a lodger Elizabeth Buckley a weaver aged 32. David married Louisa 24 April 1861 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1881 the house was home to Henry Eastell a weaver aged 39 from Norfolk and his wife Ellen (nee Lincoln) aged 36, also from Norfolk. They were married 12 February 1870 at St Paul's Shipley.

In the 1886 Electoral Register William Alderson is listed as living in the house.
From before 1891 to 1910 the occupants were the Kendall family. Thomas Kendall was born 23 August 1876 in Shipley. He married Alice Edwards (who was from London) in 1885. They had at least four children. In 1891 Thomas was a seal finisher; in 1901 he was a stone delver. Florence Kendall, daughter of Thomas, died 18 November 1891 aged just 23 months.

In 1911 the occupants were Samuel Raistrick, a worsted warehouseman aged 24 and his wife Elizabeth (nee Hart) a weaver aged 24. They were married 5 April 1910, at St Paul’s Shipley.

Thomas North who lived in the house from around 1918 served in WW1.

In the 1939 Register the occupants were Walter Hewson, a hotel waiter, born 23 September 1908, his wife Winifred (nee Hudson) born 6 March 1910, a ring twister, and their son Gordon born 16 May 1934. Walter and Winifred were married 4 July 1931 at St Peter’s Shipley.

From the Electoral Register 1913 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1913 – Samuel Raistrick
1915 – Arthur Smith
1918 to 1924 – Thomas & Ethel North
1925 – Ethel North & William Halliday
1926 to 1927 – William & Harriet Halliday
1928 – John Thomas
1930 to 1934 – John & Minnie Thomas (1931 & 1932 with Jane Jones; 1934 with Benjamin Jones.)
1935 to 1936 – Walter & Winifred Hewson & Arthur Brook Hudson
1938 to 1939 – Walter & Winifred Hewson
1945 to 1960 – Winifred Hewson & Leonard Hudson (1955 to 1959 with Gordon Hewson; 1960 with Philip Hewson)

Arthur Brook Hudson served in WW1 and his son Leonard Hudson served in WW2.

Report from Shipley Times 26 February 1958 as follows: -

Refused to Pick Up Cigarette Packet
When a police constable told him pick up the pieces of a cigarette packet which he had just torn up and thrown on the ground, Terence Hewson. aged 17 a twister, of 18 Ada Street, Saltaire refused to so. He was fined ten shillings for depositing litter on the highway, in Briggate. Shipley.
Chief Inspector Allderidge said at 11 p.m. on Saturday, January 11. P.C. Cooper was duty in Briggate. when he saw the defendant standing near the Lakean Ballroom. He tore up a cigarette packet and dropped the bits one by one on to the pavement. The constable asked him to pick them up, but he refused. There was a litter bin only 15 yards away. Hewson pleaded "guilty,” but did not appear.

Terence Hewson of 18 Ada Street, Saltaire married Miss Brenda Mann of 4 Hillside Road, Windhill Saturday 14 March 1959 at Windhill Parish Church. Terence was serving in the Royal Signals.

 

19 Ada Street

No. 19 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to William Crossley a wool comber aged 42, his wife Elizabeth and five children, three of whom were spinners.

In 1871 the occupants were William Sherwood, a woolcomber aged 40 from Berkshire, his wife Harriet and nine children, 6 of whom were spinners.

By 1878 the house was home to the Ballintyne family. John Ballintyne was born c1842 in Scotland. He married Jane Davidson, 4 December 1863, in Dumfries, Scotland. They had at least six children. John & Jane lost a son when John (jnr.) died 5 September 1878 aged just nine. In the 1881 census Jane was living in the house without her husband. She had five children living with her. John Ballintyne died in 1882. In the 1886 Electoral Register William Ballantyne, the eldest son, is listed as living in the house.

In 1891 the occupants were William Greaves a wool sorter aged 31, his wife Mary (nee Turner) and their daughter Mabel aged five. William married Mary 10 December 1885 at the Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel.

In 1901 Sam Smith a gas makers fitter aged 26 lived in the house with his wife Mary (nee Jennings) aged 27 and their son Rushton who was born 8 December 1896. Sam and Mary were married 1 August 1896 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

From around 1910 the house was home to the Milton family. Holmes Milton was born 21 November 1884 in Saltaire. He married Emily Jeffrey in 1907. Holmes worked as a dairyman/milk dealer. Holmes & Emily moved out of 19 Ada Street around 1930 and from then on, the house was home to Holmes’s brother Maurice and his wife Amelia. Maurice had his own milk round. Holmes Milton served in WW1 and his brother Maurice Milton served in WW2. Charles Milton son of Holmes served in WW2

There was a report in the Shipley Times 14 April 1943 regarding the death of Holmes Milton; the report refers to a dairy at 19 Ada Street.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1896 – William Greaves
1898 – Fred Baxter
1900 to 1904 – Sam Smith
1905 to 1908 – Fred Kitchen
1910 to 1930 – Holmes & Emily Milton
1931 to 1960 – Maurice & Amelia Milton

Amelia died in 1967 and Maurice died 29 January 1980 at 19 Ada Street.

 

20 Ada Street

No. 20 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the censuses of 1861,1871 & 1881 the house was home to the Hartop family. Thomas Hartop was born in 1804 in Warwickshire. He married Hannah Verity, 30 August 1828, in Bradford. They had six children. In 1861 Thomas was a night watchman and five of the children were mill workers. Thomas died 23 December 1871 and Hannah died 11 April 1878.

Shipley St Paul's Lower Churchyard Monumental Inscriptions

In affectionate remembrance of JOSEPH HARTOP son of THOMAS and HANNAH HARTOP of Saltaire who died March 2nd, 1865 aged 21 years
Also the above THOMAS HARTOP who died December 23rd, 1871 aged 67 years
Also the above HANNAH HARTOP who died April 11th,1878 aged 72 years
Also JANE HARTOP daughter of the above born January 7th, 1838 died June 27th, 1887
"She is not testing death, but taking rest"

In 1881 the head of the house was James Hartop, a son of Thomas & Hannah. He was born in 1847 and he was a warehouseman. Living with him was his wife Martha (nee Bolland), three young children and a lodger, Thomas Spencer a tailor aged 27. James married Martha 28 September 1872 in Bradford Cathedral.

In the 1886 Electoral Register John Bairstow is listed as living in the house.

In 1891 the occupants were William Hemmingway a quarryman aged 32, his wife Mary (nee Kendall) aged 29, four young children and a lodger, Leonard Whitaker, a mill worker, aged 21 from Lincolnshire. William married Mary 3 August 1879 at Bradford Cathedral.
In 1901 the house was lived in by William Kay, a warp twister, aged 33 and his wife Hannah (nee Whittam) aged 29. They were married in 1897 in Bradford.

From around 1910 to 1958 the house was home to Julian Butt and his family. The Shipley Times 4 March 1959 reported a planning application to Shipley Council, which did not need approval, for internal alterations to 20 Ada Street.

From the Electoral Register 1893 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1893 to 1898 – William Hemmingway
1899 – Richard Lancaster
1901 to 1907 – William & Hannan Kay
1909 – Sam Green
1910 to 1956 – Julian & Eliza Butt (with Kathleen Butt 1932 to 1936; with Ivy Halliday 1951 to 1954)
1957 to 1958 – Julian Butt
1960 – Darrell & Brenda Wood

 

21 Ada Street

No. 21 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the censuses of 1861 & 1871 the house was home to the Fox family. Luke Fox was born 1821 in Great Horton. He married Hannah Denby, born 1820 in Heponstall, 12 May 1845 at St Wilfrid Calverley. They had a son, William, 21 November 1846 in Bradford. In 1861 Luke was a wool sorter and William was a mechanic. In 1871 Luke was a weaver.

In 1881 & 1891 the occupants were the Stoney family. Edmund Stoney was born c1827 in Bierley. He married Mary Coverdale, born c1817 in Burnt Yates near Harrogate, in 1843 in Knaresborough. They had a son, William, born c1846 in Burnt Yates. In 1881 both Edmund and William were woodmen. Mary died 17 March 1891. In the 1891 census widower Edmund and his unmarried son William were working as machine joiners.

Robert Wright of 21 Ada Street died 14 January 1894 aged 65. James Thomas of 21 Ada Street died 22 December 1899 aged 27.

In 1901 the head of the house was Lily Thomas, a spinster and a sister of James, aged 34. She had a visitor with her, Annie Allen aged 32. They were both cloth workers.

In 1911 the house was home to the Newbold family. William Newbold was born 17 Jan 1874 in Staffordshire. He married Florence Bullock, born 3 August 1884 in Long Preston, in 1905 in Settle. They had a son, William, born 1905 in Long Preston. William worked as a railway signalman.

In 1918 Ernest Firth and John Robert Hall, both of 21 Ada Street, were serving their country in WW1.

In the 1939 Register the house is home to a spinster textile weaver Gertrude Elizabeth Love, born 8 October 1893. Gertrude died 27 July 1941.

Harry Wright, of 21 Ada Street, served in WW2. Tony Worth, of 21 Ada Street, aged just five months, was buried Hirst Wood Cemetery Shipley 24 December 1958.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1894 – Edmund Stoney
1898 – James Boddy
1900 – Richard Clayton
1902 to 1903 – Lily Thomas
1904 to 1910 – Ellen Peat
1911 to 1913 – William Newbould
1915 – Alfred Slingsby
1918 – Ernest Firth, George & John Robert Hall
1919 to 1925 – Ernest & Edith Firth
1926 to 1939 – Gertrude Elizabeth Love
1945 to 1958 – Harry & Nellie Wright (with Betty & Jim Pickard in 1952)
1960 – no entry

 

22 Ada Street

No. 22 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census house was home to Helen Pickles, aged 41 from Haworth and four children, three whom were mill workers and the other was a farm labourer.

In 1871 the occupants were Joseph Hodgson a wool sorter aged 27, his wife Grace (nee Crabtree) a weaver aged 26, two young children and a visitor Sarah Crabtree a weaver aged 30. Joseph married Grace 16 January 1865 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

In 1881 the occupants were John Hey a wool sorter aged 48, his wife Rebecca a dressmaker aged 43, and four children two of whom were mill workers.

From before 1885 and up to 1895 the occupants were the Hartop family. James Hartop was born 1847 in Bradford. He married Martha Bolland in 1872. In 1891 James was employed as a warehouseman, three of his five children were mill workers. Charlotte Hartop of 22 Ada Street was buried 19 April 1887, aged just eighteen months.

In 1901 the occupants were Thomas Lancaster a sawyer aged 38, his wife Louisa (nee Hessey) aged 37, and ten children, three of whom worked as spinners. One of the sons, Dyson Lancaster, served in WW1. Another son, Albert Lancaster, was found drowned in the River Aire in 1925. Thomas married Louisa 16 September 1882 at Bradford Cathedral.

In 1911 the house was home to James Judson a general labourer in a cloth mill aged 49, his wife Sarah (nee Sedgwick) aged 48, two children, their married daughter Eva aged 25, her husband George Stead a foreman painter aged 26 and their baby daughter. James married Sarah 15 July 1882 in Hovingham; Eva had married George in 1910. Harold Judson and Sydney Judson, sons of James, and George Stead and his brother Joseph Stead, all of 22 Ada Street, served in WW1.

In the 1939 Register the house was home to Evelyn Taylor a textile warper born 24 April 1915.
Jane Halliday aged 91, of 22 Ada Street, was buried 24 November 1948.

From the Electoral Register 1885 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1885 to 1895 – James Hartop
1896 to 1903 – Thomas Lancaster
1908 to 1924 – James & Sarah Judson
1925 to 1931 – Wilfrid & Mary Walker
1932 to 1934 – Charles & Elsie Morgan
1935 to 1936 – Edward & Annie Drew (with Maude Allen 1935)
1945 to 1948 – David & Lily Illingworth, Ellen Smith, Evelyn Taylor (David Illingworth served his country in WW1.)
1949 to 1956 – Lily Illingworth & Evelyn Taylor (1952 to 1954 with Edna Bassindale)
1957 to 1960 – Lily Illingworth

 

23 Ada Street

No. 23 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to Thomas Whitaker aged 26 a wool sorter from Baildon, his wife Judith (nee Hudson) a bonnet maker aged 26 and a young son. Thomas and Judith were married 17 July 1858 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1871 the occupants were David Webster a wool washer from Pudsey aged 39, his wife Elizabeth (nee Jones) aged 49, five children of whom the eldest was a weaver and Elizabeth’s grandmother, Grace Jones a widowed female aged 70. David married Elizabeth 25 August 1850 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

In 1881 the occupants were the Kaye family. Fred Kaye was born 1 August 1854 in Kirkheaton. Fred worked as an upper boot maker. He married Martha Foulds 8 October 1876 at St Paul’s Shipley. Martha was born 15 November 1854 in Shipley. They had five children. They lost their daughter Alice, when she died 29 December 1883 aged just one year and eight months.

In the 1885 Electoral Register Moses Bower was in residence.

In 1891 the head of house was James Halliday a widower and timber merchant aged 81. Living with him was his widowed daughter Ann Bowen aged 43 and four grandchildren. The eldest grandchild was a plate layer the other three were spinners.

In 1901 the occupants were William Pedley a blacksmith aged 25, his wife Lily (nee Dawber) aged 22 from London and their young daughter Elizabeth. William married Lily 30 July 1898 at Bradford Cathedral. Lily died in 1904 aged just 25.

Article from the Shipley Times dated 21 May 1909:

Mrs Edna Harrison of 23 Ada Street, Saltaire, benefits to the extent of £500 under the will of the late Mr Ellis William Tordoff, stuff and fent merchant, Bradford.

In 1911 the house was occupied by Pickles Bennett a blacksmith aged 56, his second wife Elizabeth (nee Ponder) aged 40 and three children, the eldest of whom was a spinner.

Robert Askam died here 20 April 1939 aged 68. In the 1939 Register the occupant was Mary Askam a widow born 20 May 1875. In the Shipley Times 11 November 1956 the house is listed as being sold by B L Thurston & Co, Estate Agents, 21 Otley Road, Shipley

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1899 – Joseph Simpson
1901 to 1902 – William & Lily Pedley
1906 – Mary Scott
1909 to 1910 – Fred Halliday (son Albert Halliday served in WW1)
1911 to 1915 – Pickles & Elizabeth Bennett
1918 to 1927 – Robert & Mary Askam (1918 with Joseph Edward Garner who served in WW1)
1928 – Robert & Mary Askam, Richard Huntingdon
1929 – Robert, Mary & Ivy Askam, Richard Huntingdon
1930 to 1931 – Robert, Mary & Robert jnr. Askam, Richard Huntingdon, Sydney & Ivy Buck.
1932 – Robert, Mary & Robert jnr. Askam, Richard Huntingdon
1933 – Robert, Mary, Robert jnr. & Grace Askam, Richard Huntingdon
1934 to 1936 – Robert & Mary Askam, Richard Huntingdon
1938 – Robert & Mary Askam
1939 – Mary Askam
1945 to 1954 – William, Margaret Ann & Margaret Alice Rooney
1955 to 1956 – Margaret Alice Rooney
1957 to 1960 – Walter & Florence Warth (with Ernest Warth 1957 to 1958; with Celia Warth 1958)

 

24 Ada Street

No. 24 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to two families. The first head was Rebecca Duty a laundress aged 33. She lived with three children, two of who were spinners and a visitor Mary Clark aged four. The second head was Mary Wilcock a weaver aged 25. She had living with her a lodger, Elizabeth Roberts a spinner aged 12.

In 1871 the occupants were Thomas White a wool sorter aged 35 from Allerton, his wife Susannah (nee Tillotson) aged 28, and three young daughters. The eldest daughter, Annie, worked as a spinner aged just eight. Thomas and Susannah were married 14 December 1861 in Bradford Cathedral.

In 1881 and 1891 the house was lived in by Robert Wright and his wife Martha. Robert was born c1821 in Haworth and Martha c1821 in Bramley. (Date of their marriage and Martha’s maiden name is unknown.) They both worked as cotton weavers.

In 1901 the occupants were Geraldine Barker aged 22 and her sister Marion aged 20. They were born in Leicester and they both worked as burlers.

In 1911 the house was home to Thomas Fawkes, a railway porter, his wife Annie (nee Todd), daughter Edna, Annie’s married sister, Fanny Crossland and her son Fred.

In the 1939 Register the house was home to a widowed female Priscilla Harding (nee Lockett) a spinner born 26 November 1904. She married Frederick Harding 2 August 1924 at St Paul’s Shipley. She then married Charles Goddard in 1941.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1895 – Robert Wright
1896 – William Wood
1897 – George Studley
1898 to 1900 – Albert Ainsworth
1902 to 1904 – Geraldine Barker
1906 to 1915 – Thomas & Annie Fawkes
1918 to 1928 – William & Catherine Sunderland
1929 to 1931 – Catherine Sunderland (1930 with Herbert Sunderland)
1932 to 1933 – Herbert & Gwladys Sunderland
1935 – Herbert & Irene Price
1937 to 1939 – Priscilla Harding
1945 to 1946 – Priscilla Goddard
1949 to 1960 – Priscilla & Charles Goddard (1949 & 1950 with William Harding)

 

25 Ada Street

No. 25 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to two spinster sisters from Dolphinholme in Lancashire. They were Margaret Airey a reeler aged 49 and Agnes Airey a weaver aged 34.

In 1871 the occupants were Robert Carr a warehouseman aged 33, his wife Mary (nee Hanson) a weaver aged 25 and their baby son John William aged three months.

Advert in the Leeds Mercury 12 May 1879: -

GOOD PLAIN COOK wishes a re-engagement immediately. Apply M.C. 25 Ada Street, Saltaire.

In 1881 the occupants were Samuel & Maria Wilson. Samuel was a stuff warehouseman born in Lancaster c1857. He married Maria Lightfoot 27 October 1877 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley. Maria was a weaver born 1857 in Idle.

From before 1890 to 1895 the house was home to the Crossland family. William was a wheelwright born 1862 in Idle. He married Ann Ince (born 1860 in Hull) 20 February 1886 at Bradford Cathedral. They had six children, two of whom died as infants. Their son Hartley was baptised 27 April 1890 and their daughter Bertha was baptised 6 May 1892, both at Saltaire Wesleyan Methodist Church.

Charles Hainsworth of 25 Ada Street died 10 May 1900 aged 81.

In 1901 the occupants were Sarah Dobson (nee Hainsworth) a married female aged 53 who was a charwoman and her daughter Harriet a mill worker aged 27. Sarah was a daughter of Charles Hainsworth and she had married Alfred Dobson 13 January 1873 at St James’s Halifax.

In 1911 the occupants were Elizabeth Webster a widow aged 50 from Bolton, five children and a niece Lily Rushton aged 16. The children and niece were all born in Liverpool and they were all mill workers.

In the 1939 Register the house was home to William Nicholson a retired labourer born 15 December 1865, his wife Annie born 15 January 1875 and a spinster Margaret Caine who was born 15 February 1902 and worked as wool combing box minder. William died in 1943.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1895 – William Crossland
1896 to 1908 – Sarah Dobson
1910 to 1911 – Mary Parkinson
1913 to 1915 – Elizabeth Webster (her son Stanley Webster WW1)
1918 to 1928 – William & Annie Nicholson
1929 to 1939 – William & Annie Nicholson, Margaret Caine
1945 to 1953 – Annie Nicholson & Margaret Caine
1954 to 1955 – Margaret Caine
1956 to 1957 – Geoffrey & Rita Priestley
1958 to 1960 – Eleanor Woodall

 

26 Ada Street

No. 26 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to Joseph Turner a wool sorter aged 33 from Keighley, his wife Martha (nee Gill) aged 29 and three young children. Joseph & Martha were married 20 October 1851 in Keighley Parish Church.

In 1871 the occupants were Joseph Hall a woolcomber aged 52, his wife Isabella (nee Barlie) aged 49 and two daughters who were both spinners. Joseph had married Isabella in 1841.

In 1881 the house was lived in by Nathan Stobbs a booth keeper aged 28 from Pateley Bridge, his with Mary (nee Smith) a worsted weaver aged 26 and their daughter Emily aged four. Nathan married Mary 25 December 1875 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

In the 1885 Electoral Register Albert Milton was in residence. Jane Elizabeth Mawson of 26 Ada Street died 22 May 1886 aged just seven months.

Report in the Shipley Times 12 June 1886 as follows:

Thomas Mawson, millhand of 26 Ada Street was fined 5s and costs for having to be evicted from The Ring of Bells by Constable Simpson on 2 June.

Martha Mawson of 26 Ada Street died 25 February 1887 aged just 21 days.

In 1891 the occupants were John Hirst a mechanic aged 33 from Leeds, his wife Elizabeth (nee Robinson) and four children. The eldest child Martha was a spinner aged 13. John married Elizabeth 31 March 1877 at St Mary’s Eastwood in Keighley.

From 1897 to 1901 the house was home to George Henry Hanson, a worker at Saltaire Mills.

In 1901 & 1911 the house was home to James Clegg and two of his spinster daughters, Elizabeth and Susannah. James was born 4 February 1830 in Baildon. He married Hannah Laycock 1 October 1854 at All Saints Otley. They had at least six children. Hannah died in 1888. James worked as a wool washer. Elizabeth born 22 May 1864 performed domestic duties, whilst Susannah born 4 August 1868 worked as a weaver.

In the 1939 Register the occupants were William Walgrove a journeyman baker and confectioner born 9 April 1909, his wife Lucy (nee Harrold) born 25 November 1911 and son Raymond born 11 April 1939. By 1944 the house was home to Ernest Hoyle and his family.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1896 – John Hirst
1897 to 1901 – George Henry Hanson
1902 to 1918 – James Clegg (with Elizabeth Clegg 1918)
1919 to 1925 – James & Ethel Lawton
1926 to 1927 – Annie Winterbottom
1928 – George Payne
1929 – George & Mary Payne
1930 to 1933 – George & Mary Payne, Violet Winterbottom
1934 to 1940 – William & Lucy Walgrove
1945 to 1960 – Ernest & Margaret Hoyle

Ernest Hoyle died 15 February 1967 at 26 Ada Street. Margaret died 4 November 1980 at 26 Ada Street.

 

27 Ada Street

Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was home to Thomas Shackleton a warpdresser aged 27 from Great Horton, his wife Ann (nee Cooper) a bonnet maker aged 29, four young children and a lodger, William Illingworth a dyer aged 16 from Addingham. Thomas had married Ann 27 May 1850 at Bradford Cathedral.

In 1871 the occupants were Joseph Horsfall a machine fitter aged 32, his wife Mary (nee Binns) aged 29 and five young children. Joseph and Mary were married 30 July 1862 at St Wilfrid’s Calverley.

In 1881 the house was home to Joshua Jagger a wool warehouseman aged 35, his wife Margaret (nee Jowett) aged 32 and five children. The eldest child Arthur was a spinner aged 10. Joshua and Margaret were married in 1868. Joshua was occupying the house in the 1885 Electoral Register.

Jane, daughter of John Dinsdale of 27 Ada Street, died 6 December 1888. She only lived for two hours.

In 1891 and 1901 the occupants were Frank Whincup and his wife Ruth (nee Dunn). Frank was born 1865 in Walshford near Harrogate. Ruth was born c1867 in Reeth near Richmond. They were married 10 June 1889 at St James’s Bolton in Bradford. They had no children. In 1891 Frank was working as a plush finisher, in 1901 he was a stone quarryman.

From 1909 to 1923 the house was home to James Hartop and his family.

In the Shipley Times 29 June 1923 Daisy Barlow, aged 10 years 9 months, of 27 Ada Street and attending the Central Girls School, won 3rd prize in an essay competition.

In the 1939 Register the occupants were Ben Shackleton, a labourer in a sheet metal works, born 19 February 1901, his wife Fanny (nee Stainton) a drawing box minder born 20 February 1903, and their son Eric, a bobbin pegger, born 11 January 1925. Ben and Fanny were married in 1923.

Report from the Shipley Times 22 September 1943 as follows: -

A Thin Curtain
Fanny Shackleton, millhand, of 27 Ada Street, Saltaire, was fined 20s for a black-out offence.
P.C. Jordan said he was on duty in Titus Street at 12.5 am on 3 September when he saw a light shining from the defendant’s house. He went there and saw there was a thin curtain across the window through which he could see the shape of the bulb. When he saw the defendant she said, “I have not been in long. I switched on the light. I have a blind, but I have not put it up yet.”

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1908 – Frank Whincup
1909 to 1922 – James Hartop
1923 to 1928 – Arthur & Daisy Barlow
1929 to 1960 – Ben & Fanny Shackleton

 

28 Ada Street

No. 28 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Joseph Helliwell a warehouseman aged 40 from Bradford, his wife Mary aged 37, three children, and two lodger millworker sisters Harriet & Martha Nicholls aged 25 and 22. The eldest child, George, worked as a doffer aged 12.

In 1871 the house was lived in by a widower, William Woodhouse a comber aged 52 from Lancashire and three daughters who were all weavers.

In 1881 the occupants were Moses Rawnsley and his wife Mary (nee Asker). Moses was a wool warehouseman born 1849 in Charlestown; Mary was a weaver born c1850 in Cowling.

Florence Bateson, of 28 Ada Street, died 27 May 1886 aged just nine months.

In 1891 & 1901 the house was home to the Simpson family. Samuel Simpson was born 19 January 1862 in Oakworth. He worked as a yarn scourer. Samuel had married Eva Lister 23 April 1881 at Keighley Parish Church. They had at least four children.

From c1905 to c1908 the house was home to William Isaac Lynne and his family. Alberta Lyne, of 28 Ada Street, was buried 11 May 1905 in Hirst Wood Cemetery Shipley, aged just 15 months.

In 1911 the occupants were William Hemmingway, a brickmaker’s labourer aged 52, his wife Mary (nee Kendall) and two daughters who were both spinners. William had married Mary 3 August 1879 at Bradford Cathedral.

In the 1939 Register the house was home to Arnold Mosley a warping dresser born 22 October 1917 and his wife Lillian (nee Foweather) a weaver born 8 February 1917. They were married 4th Qtr. 1938.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1902 – Samuel Simpson
1904 – John Hogg
1906 to 1908 – William Lyne
1910 to 1915 – William Hemmingway
1918 – Mary Hemmingway
1919 to 1929 – George, Elizabeth & John Hall (1929 with Edith Firth)
1930 – Arthur & Mary Slingsby
1931 to 1933 – Joseph & Beatrice Excell
1934 – Beatrice Excell
1935 to 1938 – Stanley & Gladys Wood
1939 – Arnold & Lillian Mosley
1945 to 1960 – Joseph & Ethel Mosley

 

29 Ada Street

No. 29 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by James Greenwood a spinner aged 29 from Halifax, his wife Alice (nee Pickard) aged 34 and two young sons. James married Alice 15 October 1853 at St Paul’s Shipley.

In 1871 the house was home to John Firth a warp dresser aged 36, his wife Mary (nee Wilcock) and three young daughters. Ella the eldest daughter worked as a spinner aged 10. John married Mary 24 September 1859 at Bradford Cathedral.

From 1881 to 1907 the occupants were the Rawnsley family. Job Rawnsley was born 1854 in Guiseley. He married Hannah Holt in 1876. They had seven children, with three of them dying as infants. Job worked as a warehouseman and yarn scourer; Hannah was a mill hand.

In 1911 the house was home to the Cook family. Charles Cook was born 9 December 1884 in Shipley. He married Rebecca Wilks (born 23 April 1884) 14 March 1906 at St Paul’s Shipley. They had a son Harold born 31 August 1907 and a daughter Emily born 28 March 1911. Charles worked as a dyehouse labourer.

Percy Schofield, who served in WW1, lived in the house 1920 to 1929 with his wife Elsie. They had a daughter Edna Schofield, born 2 January 1923.

In the 1939 Register the occupants were Arthur Schofield, a postman his wife Lilian (nee Jackson) and their son Dennis. Arthur served his country in WW1.

From the Electoral Register 1892 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1892 to 1907 – Job Rawnsley
1908 to 1909 – William Hobson
1910 to 1914 – Charles Cook
1915 – Albert Pickles
1918 to 1919 – William & Mary Brooks (William Arthur Brooks served in WW1)
1920 to 1929 – Percy & Elsie Schofield
1930 to 1939 – Arthur & Lilian Schofield (1930 with Winifred Lafferty; with Emily Wright 1932 to 1936)
1945 to 1960 – Arthur & Lilian Schofield (1945 to 1948 with Doreen Smith)

 

30 Ada Street

No. 30 Ada Street was built around 1856. In the 1861 census the house was occupied by Thomas Bottomley an engineer from Halifax aged 43, his wife Hannah (nee Bentley) and four children, three of whom were spinners. Thomas married Hannah in 1843. Thomas died in 1869.

In 1871 the occupants were Robert Hargreaves a gardener from Wakefield aged 31, his wife Elizabeth (nee Goldsbrough) and five young children. Robert married Elizabeth 22 January 1861 at Bradford Cathedral.

Elizabeth, widow of Michael Bentley, 30 Ada Street, died 11 April 1878.

Smith, son of Alfred Jowett, 30 Ada Street, died 27 August 1880 aged just one year. In 1881 the house was home to Alfred Jowett a cotton warp dresser aged 32, his wife Mary (nee Bower) aged 35, son William aged seven and a lodger Annie Holmes a worsted weaver aged 30.

Robert, son of Spencer Ackroyd of 30 Ada Street, died 21 November 1882 aged just 10 days.
Francis Thomas, son of J Briggs, 30 Ada Street, died 2 June 1884 aged just seven months.

In the 1885 Electoral Register 30 Ada Street is listed against Jonathan Briggs. Two children living at this house died in quick succession: John Ellis Briggs, aged three, was buried 8 November 1890 and Martha Ann Briggs, aged just 11 months, was buried 19 November 1890.

In 1891 the house was occupied by Benjamin Bairstow an outdoor labourer aged 28, his wife Hannah (nee Rawnsley), two young children, his mother Sarah aged 50, his father, William a labourer aged 49, his sister Mary a winder aged 18 and his brother George a spinner aged 14.

In 1901 the occupants were William Balmforth, a worsted overlooker aged 39, his wife Sarah (nee Leach) aged 29 and their daughter Mena aged 5.

In 1911 the house was home to Benson Riley, a wool sorter aged 58, his second wife Ann (nee Heaton) aged 51, his son Willie a cloth finisher aged 25 and a lodger Elizabeth Porter a burler mender aged 25.

Herbert Baum, a salesman aged 30 of 30 Ada Street married Mary Oakes a mill worker aged 22 of 1 Wilmer Road Shipley, 17 April 1917 at Saltaire Road Primitive Methodist Church.

In the 1939 Electoral Register the house was home to widow Eliza Clark born 26 September 1896 and spinster Alice Lucy Shaw born 16 April 1904. They were both textile workers.

From the Electoral Register 1893 to 1960 the occupants were: -
1893 – John Monaghan
1895 to 1907 – William Balmforth
1910 to 1911 – Benson Riley
1913 to 1914 – Harry Hutchinson
1918 to 1919 – Wilfred & Emily Smith
1921 to 1922 – William & Rebecca Clarke
1923 to 1927 – William Clarke
1928 – William & Eliza Clarke
1929 to 1934 – William & Eliza Clarke, Alice Shaw
1935 to 1960 – Eliza Clarke & Alice Shaw (1936 with Emily Wright)

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

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