Saltaire Village, World Heritage Site
Date:

 

 

 

Colin Coates, historian
WW1: The Saltaire Story
Second Boer War
Reel Lives
Social History
Richard Coomber's research
   
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Camm, Charles Rawson
c 1890 – 26 June 1916

Charles Rawson Camm was the son of John William Camm. John was born c1862 in Lincolnshire. He married Anne Elizabeth Firth 28 April 1883 at Bradford Cathderal. Both were living in Saltaire; John in Caroline Street and Anne in Amelia Street.
 
Charles was born c1890 in Saltaire, the youngest of three children. In 1891 the family were living with Anne’s parents at 17 Amelia Street in Saltaire. Both John and Anne were mill workers. In 1901 they were living by themselves at 17 Amelia Street.
By 1911 they were living at 31 Dove Street in Saltaire. John was working as a hotel waiter and Charles was a hanking overlooker. 

Charles enlisted with the West Yorkshire Regiment, but he was subsequently transferred to the 1st Battalion of the East Yorkshire. Charles died 26 Jun 1916 and he is remembered on Thiepval Memorial in Somme, France.

He is also remembered on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood, St. Peters and Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel.    

Campbell, Fred    
1894 – ????

Fred Campbell was the son of Thomas Hall Campbell. Thomas was born 1864 in Baildon. He married Alice Bradley in 1885. In 1889 they family were living at 32 Victoria Road in Saltaire (renumbered now as 75 Victoria Road). By 1891 they were living in Shipley and by 1901 they had moved to Burley near Leeds. Thomas was a telegraphist with the post office.

Fred, the fourth of six children, was born 1894 in Shipley.
In 1911 Fred was learning telegraphy, and living, with his grandfather, sub postmaster William Campbell, at 16 Victoria Road in Saltaire. Before he signed up for the forces he was a telegraphist for the Leeds Mercury newspaper.

Fred Campbell from SaltaireFred was a Sapper in the Signalling section of the Royal Engineers. In a letter to his mother Fred gives a vivid account of the trying times in an evacuation. Here is an extract from the letter:-

“I am writing this letter in a very awkward position. No doubt before you receive this you will have read of the “Evacuation of Suvla Bay”. The bay was my base from the first day I arrived on the Peninsula (12th October) until the never to be forgotten night of the 19th and 20th of December. My experiences during this time were somewhat varied, but suffice to say my last night in Gallipoli will be put down as one of my red letter days.

About a fortnight before the evacuation I was appointed to join the Brigade on Chocolate Hill. Now Chocolate Hill had suffered more casualties than any other particular point along our front – the signal office had been blown in once. You can imagine I felt a little nervy on my way to my new post. My chum, Heller, and myself were relieving two divisional men working the Brigade Divisional Headquarters line. We arrived all right, though of course we had to go through the usual excitement of dodging stray bullets and snipers. We had a guide who knew the road perfectly so we don’t mind  much. But I must confess the bullets were a little too lively, whizzing past our heads or our sides. I had very little sleep the first night on Chocolate Hill.

As the next fortnight gradually wore on, the rumours increased regarding an evacuation of Suvla. We often argued in the signal office how it would be done, and who would be left behind until the end to keep up communication. As the time drew near, and things were more or less settled, my chum and I arranged to toss for who should stay behind. The man who went ahead had a two and half hours start of the others, so would have a very good chance of getting clear if anything did happen.

Well, we tossed and I lost, so I had to stay behind to the very last. Everything arranged, it came to the last night. At eleven o’clock the majority of the troops left, leaving a few men to hold the whole line. Just fancy! A few men holding a Turkish army on a front of five or more miles. Two of us, a battalion operator and myself, in the office about 600 yards from the firing line, with our officer. This was the situation for two and half hours, everything was quiet! Not a rifle shot was heard, unless it was that of an occasional sniper. The Turks seemed to have become quiet as ourselves. Every now and then I would look up at the watch. At 1.30 am we were to leave, never have I known time to go so slowly. The battalion operator and I would talk and smoke to keep ourselves alive.

At last the O.C. arrived, ‘Everything quiet Campbell?’ ‘Yes sir; all quiet on our front’. ‘Right! Let the division know’. This done we broke communication with our neighbouring brigade. ’Now, Campbell, let the Division know we are closing down’ ‘Right, sir’. You can imagine how pleased I was to pack my set ready for starting. At last we said ‘good-bye’ to the officer. After cutting the line we met our O.C. at the bottom of the hill. So I can say I was one of the last two British soldiers on Chocolate Hill. Everything went off splendidly. We got away without a single casualty, unless you count a man hit on the head by a stray bullet a casualty; he was just behind me. The march down to the boat nearly killed me. I hope I shall never have another like it. After knocking about from one place to another we are now resting, and a well earned rest too. I do hope it is some time before we go into action again”

Chocolate Hill was located in Sulva Bay in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. The Gallipoli Campaign lasted from 25 April 1915 to 9 January 1916. It resulted in defeat for the Allies against the forces of the Ottoman Empire. The British lost 34,072 in the campaign.
Fred survived the war.

Thomas Hall Campbell, father of Fred, also served in the war as did his younger brother Tom.

Campbell, Thomas Hall   
1864 – ????

Thomas Hall Campbell was the son of William Campbell. William was born c1838 in Stonebeck near Harrogate. In 1863 he married Martha Walker. In 1871 they were living at Baildon with William working as a bootmaker.

Thomas, the eldest of five children, was born 1864 in Baildon. In 1881 the family were living at 46 Victoria Road in Saltaire (renumbered now as 72 Victoria Road). William was employed as a sub postmaster and Thomas a postal telegraph clerk.

Thomas married Alice Bradley in 1885. In 1889 they were living at 32 Victoria Road in Saltaire (renumbered now as 75 Victoria Road). By 1891 they were living in Shipley and by 1901 they had moved to Burley near Leeds. In 1911 Thomas was separated from his wife. He was boarding in Leeds and working in the Telegraphic Department of the Leeds Post Office. Thomas was a top billiards player.

Thomas Hall Campbell of SaltaireAlthough he was over fifty, Thomas joined the forces at the outbreak of the war. He served as a Sapper in the Signalling section of the Royal Engineers.

Thomas had two sons, Fred & Tom, who served their country and fought in the war.

Carr, Arthur  
???? – ????

In 1918 whilst serving his country Arthur Carr was living at 35 Helen Street in Saltaire with George Wilfred Carr and his second wife Mary Rosalie Goldstein Carr (nee Patterson). The relationship between George and Arthur is not known.  

Carr, John Francis
c1896 - 26 October 1917

John Francis Carr was the son of Henry Carr. Henry was born c1856 in Barnsley. In 1876 he married Miranda Oddy. In 1881 & 1891 they were living at 18 Amelia Street in Saltaire. Henry was a wool combing overlooker.  Miranda died in 1893. They had three daughters. In 1894 Henry married Annie Elizabeth Brotherton. In 1901 they were living at 21 Jane Street with their son John Francis. Henry died 1924.

John Francis was born c1896 in Saltaire. In 1911 he was living with his parents at 60 George Street in Saltaire. John Francis was employed as a worsted piece hooker in Saltaire Mill. He was well known as the scorer for the Saltaire Cricket Club Second X1. He was also connected with Saltaire’s Men Own and the Saltaire Horticultural Society.

He was appointed to the West Riding Regiment on 24 January 1916. He was subsequently transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

John Francis died 26 October 1917; he was a Private with 91st Machine Gun Company. They were attached to the 7th Division and fought in the Second Battle of Passchendale which began on the day John Francis died. He is remembered at Tyne Cot Cemetery in Belgium and on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood and St. Peters.

Carter, Jabez
1881 - 11 August 1947

Jabez Carter was the son of Henry Carter. Henry was born c1856 in Cambridgeshire. In 1891 and 1901 he was a grain warehouseman living with his wife, Hannah, and two children in Leeds.

Jabez, an only son with an elder sister, was born 1881 in Leeds. Working as an electrical fitter he married Mary Ellen Jackson 26 March 1910 at St. Marys Hunslet. In 1911 they were living at 25 Woodhall Avenue in Bradford. They had a son Frederick born early in 1911.

Jabez served in the war and survived. In 1915 they were living at 67 Victoria Road in Saltaire. By 1918 they had moved to 53 Titus Street in Saltaire where they remained until at least 1930.

Jabez died 11 August 1947 leaving behind his widow living at 1133 Leeds Road in Thornbury, Bradford. At this time his son, Frederick, was working as an electrical contractor.

Carver, Harry  
1891 – ????

Harry Carver was the son of Joseph Carver. Joseph was born c1864 in Bradford. In 1888 he married Elizabeth Bradley.

Harry, their only child, was born 1891 in Shipley. In 1901 they were living in Shipley with Joseph working as a fish dealer.

In 1911 Harry, a wool sorter, was living with his grandmother, Mary Ann Bailey, at 25 Albert Road in Saltaire (now renumbered 49 Albert Road).

Harry served his country and survived the war. He lived with the Bailey family at 30 Dove Street in Saltaire.   

Chadwick, John 
???? – ????

In 1918 whilst serving his country John Chadwick was living with Sarah Ann Parker at 51 Victoria Road in Saltaire. The relationship between Sarah and John is not known.  

Chaplin, Frederick Albert
10 June 1869 – March 1919

Frederick Albert Chaplin was the son of Zerah Chaplin. Zerah was born 8 April 1846 in Plomesgate in Suffolk. He married Sarah Manning 25 December 1868 in Plomesgate.

Frederick was born 10 June 1869 in Stratford in Essex. In 1871 the family were living in Stratford with Zerah working as a bricklayer; by 1881 they had moved to West Ham. Sarah died in 1888; widowed Zerah married Catherine Negus 22 Sep 1889 at Bethnal Green.

Frederick, a carter for railway goods, married a widow, Lavinia Carr (nee Barnett) 14 February 1900 in Bradford. They had two sons: Frederick born 1901 and Leslie born 1904. In 1901 they lived at 33 Ada Street in Saltaire, moving to 7 Whitlam Street before 1911.

Frederick enlisted with the 6th Battalion Prince of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment 27 August 1914. He was promoted to Corporal 24 December 1914 and then to Lance Sergeant 15 May 1915. He was discharged 10 Jan 1919 and died in March of the same year.

Frederick is remembered on the Nab Wood Roll of Honour.

Chapman, Ira
1894 – 20 July 1948

Ira Chapman was the son of James Chapman. James was born c1864 in Suffolk. He married Mary Sharp 2 October 1883 at Bradford Cathedral. James was living at 6 Jane Street in Saltaire and Mary at 19 Shirley Street. By 1891 they were living at 15 Dove Street in Saltaire with James working as a worsted overlooker.

Ira, the fourth of seven children, was born 1894 in Saltaire. In 1901 & 1911 the family were living at 17 Jane Street in Saltaire. In 1911 Ira was a boy in the Royal Navy aboard HMS King Alfred berthed in Torquay. The family lived at 17 Jane Street throughout the war.
Ira survived the war serving in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Ajax.

Ira married Rosina Ann Jones 25 May 1918 at St. Peters, Shipley. He died 20 July 1948; he had been living at 10 Belmont Crescent in Shipley with his family.

Ira had two bothers who also served their country and fought in the war; James and Thompson.

Chapman, James Arthur
1897 – 26 March 1918

James Arthur Chapman was the son of James Chapman. James was born c1864 in Suffolk. He married Mary Sharp 2 October 1883 at Bradford Cathedral. James was living at 6 Jane Street in Saltaire and Mary at 19 Shirley Street. By 1891 they were living at 15 Dove Street in Saltaire with James working as a worsted overlooker.

James Arthur, the second youngest of seven children, was born 1897 in Saltaire. In 1901 & 1911 the family were living at 17 Jane Street in Saltaire. In 1911 James Arthur aged just 14 worked as a jobber in the mill. The family lived at 17 Jane Street throughout the war. James Arthur married Beatrice E. Rumbelow in the 1st Quarter of 1918 in Doncaster.

James Arthur served as a Private with the 6th Battalion Connaught Rangers. He died 26th March 1918. He is buried in St. Souplet British Cemetery in Northern France.

James Arthur is remembered on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood and Saltaire Wesleyan Chapel. He had two bothers who also served their country and fought in the war; Ira and Thompson.

Chapman, Thompson
18 October 1895 – June 1974

Thompson Chapman was the son of James Chapman. James was born c1864 in Suffolk.  He married Mary Sharp 2 October 1883 at Bradford Cathedral. James was living at 6 Jane Street in Saltaire and Mary at 19 Shirley Street. By 1891 they were living at 15 Dove Street in Saltaire with James working as a worsted overlooker.

Thompson, the fifth of seven children, was born 18 October 1895 in Saltaire. In 1901 & 1911 the family were living at 17 Jane Street in Saltaire. In 1911 Thompson was a jobber in the mill. The family lived at 17 Jane Street throughout the war.

Thompson, working as a labourer at Milner Field Farm, enlisted 8 August 1914. He served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington (West Riding Regiment). In April 1915 he was badly wounded and was in hospital in Rouen, France. Here is an extract from a letter he wrote:-

  “Just to let you know that I am going on as well as can be expected. I have been wounded in the right shoulder, left forearm and right eye. I have lost the sight of my right eye, but the other is all right. I shall be getting sent to England very soon.”     

In a previous letter Thompson said he had a narrow escape. Two of them were in a dugout when it collapsed and his companion was killed.

Thompson was transferred to Castle Red Cross Hospital 30 April 1915. He made a full recovery and resumed fighting with his battalion. He was eventually discharged on medical grounds 8 April 1918. He lived at 17 Jane Street until 1925 when he moved to 17 Whitlam Street in Saltaire. He moved away from the Shipley area around 1930.

Thompson died in Leicestershire in June 1974.
 
Thompson had two bothers who also served their country and fought in the war; James and Ira.

Chapman, Robert
????–????

Robert Chapman served in and survived the war. In 1916 he married Ruth A. Priestley. The married couple lived with Ruth’s family at 25 Albert Road (renumbered 49) in Saltaire.

Charlesworth, George
1 October 1881 – 18 July 1928

George Charlesworth was the son of John Charlesworth.

John was born 7 July 1856 in Saltaire. He married Lucy Ann London 12 May 1879 at St Pauls Shipley. They lived all their married lives at 1&2 Victoria Road in Saltaire, where they ran a grocery business.

George, the second of five children, was born 1 October 1881 in Saltaire. He was working in his family’s grocery business when he married Lily Anderson 23 August 1904 at St Paul Shipley. They had two children: John Leslie (2 October 1907 – 1971) and Kathleen (born 7 March 1909). In 1911 the family were living at 26 Leyburn Grove in Shipley with George working as a professional musician. In 1914 they moved to 49 Avondale Road in Shipley.

George enlisted 12 December 1915. He was mobilised 5 June 1917 and served with the Royal Garrison Artillery, reaching the rank of Acting Corporal before being discharged 19 December 1919.

George died 18 July 1928 and he was buried at Hirst Wood Cemetery in Shipley.

George was well known for performing as a bass singer and he was a member of the Shipley Amateur Operatic Society. His stage name was “Charlesworth George.”

George Charlesworth advert

Chew, William
1873 – ????

William Chew was the son of George Chew. George was born c1836 in Wetwang.  He married Mary Hyde in 1869 in Driffield.

William, the eldest of four sons, was born 1873 in Beverley. In 1891 the family were living in Beverley with William an apprentice painter.

In 1911 William was a boarder with the Bootham family at 2 Lower School Street in Saltaire; he was employed as a motor car painter. William married Beatrice Bootham 23 December 1911 at Bradford Registry Office. The married couple continued to live at 2 Lower School Street. They had a son, Stanley, born 14 May 1912.

William enlisted as a Private with the Kings Own Scottish Borderers 27 December 1895. At the outbreak of the war he was mobilised and posted. He was transferred to the Gordon Highlanders. After seeing action in France he was discharged 26 December 1916.

William and Beatrice were still living at 2 Lower School Street in 1962.

Clay, Vincent Bycroft
11 November 1898 – 1969

Vincent Bycroft Clay was the son of Thomas Clay. Thomas was born c1852 in Willenhall, Staffordshire. He married Kate Candline 25 December 1872 in Willenhall. In 1881 they lived in Willenhall and in 1891 in Wolverhampton. Thomas was a coal miner

Vincent, the youngest of eight children, was born 11 November 1898 in Pontefract. He was baptised 14 days later at St Giles & St Mary Pontefract. In 1901 the family were living in Pontefract and in 1911 in Halifax. Vincent aged 12 was working as a doffer. By 1915 the family were living at 9 Dove Street in Saltaire.

Vincent served as a Private in the Royal Army Medical Corps. Having survived the war he was working as a cloth finisher when he married Clara Butterfield 14 May 1921 at Providence Chapel Shipley. They lived at 27 Victoria Street in Shipley before moving to 12 School Street around 1929. By 1939 they were living at 16 Lynwood Avenue in Shipley. Vincent died in 1969. He had an elder brother, William, who also served in the war.       

Clay, William Henry
1885  – ????

William Henry Clay was the son of Thomas Clay. Thomas was born c1852 in Willenhall, Staffordshire. He married Kate Candline 25 December 1872 in Willenhall. In 1881 they lived in Willenhall in 1891 in Wolverhampton. Thomas was a coal miner.

William, third of eight children, was born 1895 in Durham. In 1901 the family were living in Pontefract and in 1911 in Halifax. William was a coal miner. By 1915 the family were living at 9 Dove Street in Saltaire. William married May Howard 24 March 1915 at St Peters Shipley.

William volunteered at the outbreak of the war and saw active service in France from 1915. He served as a Lance Corporal with Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He was invalided home in 1916 and discharged unfit for service in June 1916. In 1919 he was living with his wife at 17 Ada St in Saltaire. Around 1929 they moved to 52 Titus Street.

William had a younger brother, Vincent, who also served in the war.     

Clegg, George Henry
24 January 1886 – 1 July 1916

George Henry Clegg was the son of Elijah Clegg. Elijah was born c1857 in Horton. He married Catherine Ann Smith 4 August 1877 at Bradford Cathedral.

George was born 24 January 1886, the fourth of nine children. He was baptised 6 April 1888 at St. James Church in Bradford.
In 1891 the family were living in Horton with Elijah a labourer. By 1901 they had moved to 1 Murgatroyd Place in Shipley; Elijah working as a labourer and George as a worsted spinner.

George married Ethel Kitchen 24 December 1910 at St. Pauls, Shipley. George was living at 16 Dale Street, Shipley and Ethel at 3 Well Croft, Shipley. In 1911 they were both mill workers, living without children at 4 Bath Buildings in Saltaire. They then lived at 15 George Street, before moving to 27 Amelia Street. By then George was a Great Northern Railway employee working at Windhill.

George enlisted 8 September 1914, joining the 7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment. They went to the front with the 17th (Northern) Division, landing in Boulogne in France 14 July 1915.

George, a Lance Corporal, died 1 July 1916 as his battalion captured the village of Fricourt, near Albert in Northern France. George was buried in Fricourt New Military Cemetery.

George is remembered on the Nab Wood Roll of Honour.

Clegg, Herbert Ramsden  
2 March 1900 – 19 February 1933

Herbert Ramsden Clegg was the son of Thomas Clegg. Thomas was born c1863 in Huddersfield. He married Elizabeth Ellen Ramsden in 1890.

Herbert, the third of four children, was born 2 March 1900 in Huddersfield. In 1911 the family were living at Thurstonland (near Huddersfield) with Thomas working as a foreman finisher. By 1918 the family were living at 38 Albert Road (renumbered now as 75) in Saltaire.

Herbert served in the war as a Sergeant in the Royal Air Force. He was awarded a Royal Aero Club Certificate 30 November 1918; this qualified him to be a pilot. Herbert emigrated to Canada aboard the Canadian Pacific passenger liner “Montrose”. Sailing from Liverpool he arrived in St. John Brunswick 14 March 1925. Herbert married Frances Hemingfield Eling 3 October 1925 in Lanark Ontario. They had a son, William, born 1926 in Perth, Ontario.

Herbert died 19 February 1933 in tragic circumstances. The following is taken from a Canadian newspaper article:-
“Timmins, Ontario Feb 22 – Fighting snow-blocked roads, a tractor and snowplow crew Tuesday was attempting to open traffic to Wawaitin Falls so that the bodies of five victims of Sunday’s airplane crash at Lake Kenogamisis might be brought to their relatives in Schumacher. Arriving at Wawaitin, a distance of 20 miles the crew will rest before breaking 28 miles of trail to Lake Kenogamisis lumber camp where Pilot H. R. Clegg and four Schumacher residents lost their lives when their plane crashed into a high Jack pine.

Herbert Clegg, 30 November 1918

Herbert Clegg, 30 November 1918
Mouse over image for close-up

A blizzard Monday night swept snow into huge drifts on the roads and prevented the return of the Provincial Police officers who had driven into the camp Monday on a sleigh. One report here was that they had started to return with the bodies and were blocked on the road 15 miles from the camp.

Fellow employees of four of the crash victims manned the tractor and snowplow which set out from Timmins Tuesday. The Fieldman timber company sent the machines to return the bodies of their Schumacher employees who had been visiting one of their lumber camps before their deaths.”

Herbert’s widow and son returned to Yorkshire in 1933.

Clough, Holbein
1889 – 13 August 1962

Holbein Clough was the son of Amos Clough. Amos was born c1855 in Manningham. He married Martha Ann Briggs 15 December 1877 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1881 they were living at 39 Helen Street in Saltaire. Amos was a wool sorter and they had two sons. Martha died in 1882. Amos then married Tabitha Parker in 1886. They had three children with Holbein, born 1889 in Saltaire, being the middle child. From 1891 to 1911 they lived at 61 Titus Street in Saltaire. Sometime after 1911 they moved to 4 Maddocks Street in Saltaire.

Holbein survived the war having served as a Private with the Northumberland Fusiliers. Holbein, a spinner, married Lily Brooks in 1923. They lived at 30 Thompson Street in Shipley until 1932 when they moved Baildon. They returned to Saltaire, living at 53 Titus Street until Holbein’s death 13 August 1962.

Holbein had a younger brother, Sam, who sadly lost his life serving his country.

Clough, Sam
c 1897 – 24 June 1917

Sam Clough was the son of Amos Clough. Amos was born c1855 in Manningham. He married Martha Ann Briggs 15 December 1877 at Bradford Cathedral. In 1881 they were living at 39 Helen Street in Saltaire. Amos was a wool sorter and they had two sons. Martha died in 1882. Amos then married Tabitha Parker in 1886. They had three children with Sam, born c1897 in Saltaire, being the youngest. From 1891 to 1911 they lived at 61 Titus Street in Saltaire.

In 1911 Sam, aged 14 was a bobbin pegger. Sometime after 1911 they moved to 4 Maddocks Street in Saltaire. Sam served as a Private with the 9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. He died 24 June 1917 and he is remembered on the Arras Memorial in Northern France.

Sam is also remembered on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood, St. Pauls and Saltaire United Reform Church.

Sam had an older brother, Holbein, who also served his country and fought in the war     

Connell, Josiah
1891 – 31 August 1918

Josiah Connell was the son of Guy Connell. Guy was born c1857 in Kippax. He married Sarah Jane Atkinson in 1882. In 1891they were living at 24 Fanny Street in Saltaire; Guy was a silk warp discharger.

Josiah was born in the last quarter of 1891 in Saltaire, the younger of two children. In 1901 & 1911 they were living in Bramley. In 1911 Josiah was a joiner’s apprentice.

Josiah served as a Private with the Seaforth Highlanders. He died 31 August 1918 and he is remembered on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial near Arras in Northern France.

Josiah is not remembered on any Rolls of Honour in the Shipley area.

Constantine, Bertie
1896 – 1944

Bertie Constantine was the son of John Constantine. John was born c1857 in Shipley. In 1886 he married Jane Elizabeth Johnstone. In 1891 they were living at 25 Almshouses in Saltaire with John a worsted spinning overlooker.

Bertie, the second youngest of six children, was born 1895 in Saltaire. In 1901 the family were living at 23 Jane Street in Saltaire; John died in 1905. In 1911 widow Jane and her children were living at 16 William Henry Street in Saltaire with Bertie working as mohair spinner doffer. By 1915 they had moved to 24 Rhodes Street in Saltaire; they remained there throughout the war.
Bertie served as a Private with the 7th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment) having attested 29 November 1915. He was mobilised 27 January 1916 and was posted to France 12 July 1916. Three months later he came home injured. After recovering he returned to France 8 July 1917. He fought for nine months until he was badly injured 16 April 1918. He remained at home until he was discharged physically unfit 8 November 1918.

Bertie married Elsie May Metcalfe 20 December 1919 at St Pauls Shipley. They lived at 5 Mount Place in Shipley.
Bertie died 1944 in Keighley District.

George Edward Day, brother in law to Bertie, lost his life in serving his country.

Conway, James  
???? – ????

In 1918 whilst serving his country James Conway was living with the Sugden family at 2 Jane Street in Saltaire. The relationship between the family and James is not known.  

Cooke, Douglas
1888 – 1958

Douglas Cooke was the son of Frederick William Cooke. John was born c1862 in Luton, Buckinghamshire. In 1885 he married Emma Pullan at Stoke upon Trent.

Douglas, the elder of two sons, was born 1888 in Staffordshire. In 1891 the family were living at 47 Nutall Road in Bradford with Frederick working as a printer compositor. In 1901 they were living at 28 Heaton Road in Bradford with Frederick now working as a tailor & boot/shoe dealer. In 1911 widowed Frederick had the same job and was living with his two sons and his spinster sister at 31 Skinner Lane in Bradford. Douglas was employed as a warehouseman in a boot factory.

Douglas married Kitty Roberts 20 December 1911 at St. Pauls Shipley. Kitty was living, with her parents, at 1 Baker Street in Saltaire. She remained there, with her husband, throughout the war.

Douglas served as a Private with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He attested 28 June 1916 and went to the front in October 1916. He was employed by T. H. Walker, boot manufacturers in Bradford. He was a member of the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows. He was wounded in the right arm by shrapnel 20 July 1918 and he recovered in a Gloucester hospital. That was the third time he had been wounded.

Douglas died in 1958 and was buried 3 April 1958 at St Pauls Shipley.

Coope, Oswald Denton
10 December 1882 – 11 November 1918

Oswald Denton Coope was the son of Joseph Coope. Joseph was born c1841 in Bramley. He married Emma Sigston 12 December 1864 at St. Mark’s Church in Woodhouse, Leeds.
Oswald was born in Saltaire 10 December 1882, the youngest of eight children. In 1891 the family lived at 7 Dove Street in Saltaire; Joseph was a plasterer. By 1901 they living at 24 Rhodes Street in Saltaire; both Oswald and his father were plasterers.

In 1905 Oswald emigrated to Canada. He sailed on the “Lake Erie” from Liverpool 4 April 1905 bound for New Brunswick in Canada. In 1911 he was living in Vancouver, Canada.
Oswald enlisted 31 January 1916 as a Sapper with the 6th Field Company of the Canadian Engineers. At this time his parents were living in Wilsden in Yorkshire.

Oswald died 11 November 1917. His grave can be found in the Oxford Road Cemetery in Ypres, Belgium. He is not remembered in any Rolls of Honour in the Shipley area.

Cooper, Herbert
29 June 1898 – 8 October 1916

Herbert Cooper was the son of Harry Cooper. Harry Cooper was born c1872 in Bingley. He married Georgina Alice Robinson 28 April 1894 at Holy Trinity, Bingley. They had five children. In 1901 they were living at Otley, Harry was a blacksmith. By 1911 they had moved to 31 Constance Street in Saltaire, Harry was a blacksmith in the mill.

Herbert was their second youngest child, born 29 Jun 1898 in Otley. He was baptised 22 September 1899 at All Saints, Otley,

Herbert died 8th Oct 1916, aged just eighteen. He was a gunner with “D” Battery 99th Brigade Royal Field Artillery. They were an artillery unit within 22nd Division, who from Oct 1915 fought in the Balkans. Herbert’s grave is in the Karasouli Military Cemetery in northern Greece. He is remembered on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood and St. Peters.

At the time of Herbert’s death his parents were living at 1 Katherine Street, Saltaire. Georgina Alice Cooper died 13 July 1945 aged 71. They were living at 13 Lynwood Avenue in Shipley. Harry died from the same address 1 June 1955 aged 82.      

Corfield, James
19 November 1882  – 1974

James was born 19 November 1882 in Manchester, parents unknown. In 1901 he was a boarder living with the Cowman family in Shipley. James, now a cloth finisher living in Windhill, married Isabella Robinson 29 July 1905 at St Wilfrids Calverley. They lived at 17 Fanny Street in Saltaire.

James served his country and survived the war. He lived with his family at 17 Fanny Street until around 1935 when they moved to 28 Ashley Road in Shipley. They remained in Ashley Road moving to number 3 around 1939. James died in 1974.     

Coultas, Milfred
1889 - 1960

Milfred Coultas was the son of Stainforth Coultas. Stainforth was born 20 Feb 1858 in Bradford. He married Ann Townend in 1882. 

Milfred, the second of four children, was born 1889 in Wibsey. In 1891 & 1901 the family were living in Bradford with Stainforth working as a steam tram engine driver. In 1911 the family were living at 21 William Henry Street in Saltaire with Milfred working as a wool warehouseman.

Milfred married Mary Ann Miller 15 June 1912. He had enlisted with the 6th Battalion Prince of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment 14 June 1910. He saw action with the 15th Battalion, here is an extract from a letter published in June 1915. It was to his wife who was living at 65 Victoria Road in Saltaire;-

“I am still in tip-top condition, although at the present time I could do with a good long sleep, and then a good feed and a hot bath. We have fireworks here every night and I can assure you there are no dummies (they are all crackers) and the more you keep your head down the longer you are likely to live. We look over the top sometimes to see what is going on, and as soon as we do one or two bullets come past our head, and we bob down and thank god they missed.

Last week-end we were in a pub, when the Germans started shelling the place. The sale of beer was stopped, and the people in charge ran all over the house, but they did not forget to take the till with them. We get plenty of amusement out here one way and another, and also some excitement. The other day a comrade and I were sent to try and find a sniper, who had been bothering our chaps, but the enemy started shelling, and as it was getting a bit hot we came in again. On our return pieces of shell, shrapnel, and bullets kept dropping around me – to near to be pleasant

I have heard it said in England that the Germans are bad shots, but don’t believe it. I do not mind rifle or even shell fire, but I do detest the trench mortars, as they make a noise like the crack of doom, and it is doom for anyone who is unlucky enough to be in the way.”

A few weeks later his wife received another letter from Milfred saying that although he had been five weeks in the trenches at various places and at various times he had yet to see a German. In the day the Germans keep their heads down and so do the English, for it does not pay to be too inquisitive. At night, however, they are compelled to take greater risks, so it is necessary for them to keep a sharp lookout. Milfred wrote;-

“We had a band performance round the cook-house fire last night. The music ranged from operatic to rag-time; a great favourite was. “Has anyone seen a German band?” Our instruments consisted of a drum, three combs, a mouth organ and a tin biscuit box. Those who had nothing to play furnished the vocal parts, and they did let it go, especially when singing the “German band” song. The Huns must have heard us for they sent dozens of shots over, but they were all wasted. They had not the slightest effect on our entertainment, which went on until nearly nine o’clock in the morning.”                   

Milfred was promoted to Lance Corporal 18 November 1916. He survived the war and was discharged 2 May 1919. He married, for a second time, Louisa Lacey. They had four children; Flora Althea (1920-2008), John Charles (1922-1988), Vincent (1927-2006) and Richard Milfred (1925-1966). In 1938 they ran a shop at 2 John William Street in Flush, Spen Valley. They were living in Gildersome. Milfred died in 1960.      

Cowgill, William
1878 –????

William Cowgill was the son of John Cowgill. John was born 1839 in Thornton. John married Emma Raistrick 4 April 1867 at Bradford Cathedral. They had two sons and two daughters but both of the daughters died within their first year. In 1871 they were living at 21 Amelia Street in Saltaire with John working as a labourer.

William, the younger son, was born 1878 in Saltaire. In 1881 the family were living at 22 Amelia Street; by 1891 they had moved to 20 Amelia Street with William working as a spinner. Emma died in 1896 and was buried 7 March 1896 in St Paul’s churchyard in Shipley. In 1901 William, a tin plate worker, was living at 20 Amelia Street with his widowed father.

William married Margaret Firth 26 December 1903 at Bradford Cathedral. Margaret had a daughter, Ivy Mary born in 1902; father unknown. William and Margaret had six children including:-
John Henry (7 December 1904 – 1989)
Joseph (b1907)
James (b1909)
Walter (b1910)
They lived with William’s widowed father, moving with him to 27 Rhodes Street around 1910. In 1911 they were at 19&21 North Bank Road in Shipley with William working as sheet metal worker. Around 1916 they all moved to Caroline Street in Saltaire.

John died in 1917 and he was buried 13 March 1917 in St Paul’s churchyard.
In September, with William serving in the war, Margaret was subject to an ejectment order; the case was adjourned for three months.

William survived the war and by 1918 they were not living in Saltaire.

Cox, Walter
1893 – ????

Walter Cox was the son of William Cox. William was born c1848 in Manningham. He married Mary Ann Delves in 1873. They lived in Baildon until at least 1911 with William working as a joiner.

Walter, the second youngest of nine children, was born 1893 in Baildon. He was an able seaman when he married Mary Ann Filby 29 March 1915 at St Peters Shipley. They lived at 9 Caroline Street in Saltaire.

Walter served his country as an Able Seaman in the Royal Navy and he survived the war. They continued to live in Caroline Street until around 1926 when they moved to 16 Ada Street in Saltaire.

Critchley, Edward  
???? – ????

In 1918 whilst serving his country Edward Critchley was living at 15 Ada Street in Saltaire. The rest of the household are not known.

Crossland, Walter
1896 - ????

Walter Crossland was the son of William Hartley Crossland. William was born 1862 in Windhill. He married Ann around 1886. In 1891 they were living at 25 Ada Street in Saltaire with William working as a wheelwright.   

Walter, the fourth of six children, was born 1896 in Shipley. In 1911 the family were living at 39 Dove Street in Saltaire with Walter working as a cloth finisher.

Walter served his country and survived the war. From 1914 to 1919 he lived at 23 George Street in Saltaire. From 1924 to 1947 he lived at 9 Maddocks Street in Saltaire.   

Cryer, Heber
1879 – 2 August 1943

Heber Creyer was the son of John William Hartley Crossland.
John was born c1853 in Shipley. He married Mary Darnbrough in 1874. The family lived in Shipley with John working as a joiner.

Heber, the middle child of three, was born 1879 in Shipley. Heber was a joiner when he married Alice Bolton 29 October 1907 at St Pauls Shipley. They had two children; Elsie born 1903 & Arthur born 1905.  In 1911 they lived at 44 Rhodes Street in Saltaire where they remained until 1920 when they moved to 14 Market Street in Shipley. Heber worked as a joiner and undertaker.   

Heber served as a Sapper with the Inland Water Transport Corps Royal Engineers. He enlisted 8 December 1915 and was held in reserve until he was posted 26 August 1916. Heber was discharged 2 March 1919. Heber died 2 August 1943 in Morecambe.   

Cutler, Thomas
c1892 –????
[Added to website: 2 July 2017]

Thomas Cutler was the son of Joseph Cutler. Joseph was born c1861 in Worcestershire. He married Marian Woffenden in 1881 in Barnsley. They had 14 children but four died young. In 1891 they were living at Wombwell near Barnsley with Joseph working as a miner.

Thomas, the third of the ten children who survived beyond childhood, was born c1892 in Wombwell. In 1901 they were living at Brampton Bierlow near Rotherham. In 1911 they were at Wath upon Dearne near Rotherham with Thomas working as a miner. By 1917 they have had moved to 2 Constance Street in Saltaire, where Joseph and Marian lived for the rest of their lives. Joseph died 9 July 1940 and was buried in Nab Wood Cemetery in Shipley, Marian died 5 June 1952 and was buried alongside him.

Thomas served in and survived WW1. He lived with his parents until 1921.
Joseph William Cutler, an elder brother of Thomas, also served in the war and he was awarded the Military. There is no record of him ever living in Saltaire.

 
 
   

 
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